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Full text of "Craig's business directory and Baltimore almanac, for .."

UNIV OF MD COLLEGE PARK 



3 1M30 DD3D202M 7 



ADVERTISEM ENT 



The undersigned begs leave to present the business community 
and the public generally, the first volume of tlie "Business Di- 
rectory and Baltimore Almanac," which it is Ids intention to 
continue every year, as long as he may enjoy life and health, and 
tin work meet the approbation ami patronage of the public. ' 

That web. a work is desirable, there can he no doubt; and its 
advantages may be readily seen by' referring to. the variety of its 
contents, which set forth, as far as possible, in the firs issue, the 
.entire internal operations of the city of Baltimore, and furnish 
valuable information in regard to other cities. 

The miniature size of the work fenders it very convenient both 
for the counting room and the traveller, as if may be readily ^t 
tached to the desk or carried in the pocket. As a reference b 
it.ca not hut be of great advantage to all who desire iuformati 
upon the numerous subjects referred to in its pages. 

As this is b. t the beginning of the enterprize, and has thus far 
met with more favor than was anticipated, the publisher indulges 
a confident hope that it maybe continued through many years, 
with constantly increasing interest both to himself and his friends. 
The knowledge gained by actual experience, in preparing for the 
first emission, will be of more value, to the publisher than any 
pecuniary profit he could possibly derive Irom it; and it is his 
purpose to apply that experience with untiring industry in his future 
efforts, and he cannot lor a moment entertain the least fear but that 
he shall be able to give entire satisfaction to every individual who 
may patronize his exertions. 

The volume for 1843 will be commenced early, and as many addi- 
tions and improvements are contemplated, it is hoped that all 
Interested in the success of a work so desirable, will respond to 
his call for m formation in relation to ever}- subject of interest 
connected with the ejty. 

In future, a complete list of the Business Community will be given, 
without charge, and without reference to subscriptions for the 
work ; and it would he well for those who conteni] late a change 
in business on the first of January, to advise the pui lisher of it as 
early as possible, so that he'may be correct in his publication of 
their names, places of business, etc. J , 

The next volume will be beautifully got up, — the inside will be 
embellished with appropriate devices, and the cover will be em- 
bossed in a very splendid style. 



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Jo. 110 Baltimore-Street, j 

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BALTIMORE. 

Population in As /n 102,670 



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No. I. 

CRAIG'S 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



BALTIMORE ALMANAC; 



18 4 2. 



Published Annually. 



BALTIMORE : 
PUBLISHED BY DANL. H. CRAIG. 

PRINTED BY J. ROBINSON. 
1842. 



PREFx\CE. 

It is needless to speak of the utility of a work like the one here offered to the 
public. The advantages of a panoramic view of a large city, announcing its en- 
tire internal arrangement, with the names and locations of its public institutions, 
buildings, etc. and also those of persons conducting every kind ofbusineas, must 
be apparent. To the stranger, as well as to the citizen, it cnnnot be but of great 
value, as it affords him, at a glance, almost any information he may desire in re- 
ference to the persons and places he may be in search of 

In the present volume there is contained no trifling amount of information, 
which has been procured at much expense and trouble; but the publisher has, 
notwithstanding, to acknowledge that he has fallen far behind his desires and in- 
tentions in the matter. In the beginning of his enterprize, he has encountered 
and overcome numerous difficulties, which cannot impede his progress in the 
future; and, life and health permitting, he anticipates, in another year, to make 
many important improvements. The information he has obtained, in relation to 
societies, institutions, etc. is imperfect and incomplete ; but as the officers, whose 
duty it was to have communicated with him on the subject, and failed to do so, 
although called upon repeatedly through the public papers, will now see the neces- 
sity and importance of giving their attention to it,he therefore looks for no fur- 
ther impediment on this score. The Business Directory is not so complete as 
could have been desired. The plan of publishing by subscription, was not adopt- 
ed with the intention to omit the name of any, but as a mere experiment, in 
order to ascertain the amount of patronage that might be relied upon ; and having 
become satisfied that the work will commend itself to the general favor of the 
business community, the namesof all persons and firms engaged in business, will 
be given, in succeeding numbers, without regard to their subscribing in advance. 

The number for the coming year, will be got up in a style far superior to the 
present. Its internal embellishments will be more attractive, and a beautiful 
embossed cover, from an appropriate original design, will enhance the value of 
its exterior. The price of the book will be reduced, as there have been expenses 
attending the issue of this, which cannot fall upon any subsequent number. 

The great difficulty attending the copying and printing the namesof all persons 
correctly, in the beginning of the enterprize, is the apology offered for any imper- 
fections that may have occurred in this department. As more time will be al- 
lowed, and greater care taken in future, this fault will be entirely obviated. Ar- 
rangements for the next number of the Business Directory will be commenced 
early, and it is the intention of the publisher to devote his whole time, during 
the Summer and Fall, to the collection of the most interesting and valuable mat- 
ter that can be procured ; he trusts that he shall be able to present the public 
with a volume which shall not be surpassed in importance by any work of its 
size. 

With a view to the contemplated additions and improvements for the next 
issue, the publisher would make an early call upon the proprietors and superin- 
tendents of all the institutions in the city, and the officers of associations general- 
ly, to furnish him with such information as will enable him to bring them 
prominently before the public. 



Entered according to act of Congress, in the year 1842, by 

DANL, H. CRAIG, 

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the District of Maryland. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY and BALTIMORE ALMANAC, 

For tlic Year 1843, 

Being tho latter part of the 66th, and the beginning of the G7th, year of the In- 
dependence of the United States of America; and the 6065th year of the Julian 
period; and the latter part of the 6603d, and the heginning of the 5603d year, 
since the creation of the world, according to the Jews; and the 2696th year, since 
the foundation of Home, according to Varro ; And the latter part of t! 
and the beginning of the 1358th (lunar) year, since the Hegira, or (light of Mahomet. 



Dominical Letter, 

Epact, 

Lunar Cycle, or Golden Number 



CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES 
B I Solar Cycle, . 



3 

Roman Indiction, ...... 15 

Julian Period 6555 



ECLIPSES. 

In 18-1-2, there will he five Eclipses, — three of the Sun, and two of the Moon. 

The first will he of the Sun, January 11, invisible in all North America, but 
visible and annular in the South Pacific Ocean. 

The second will be a partial Eclipse of the Moon, January 26, invisible to the 
United States. 

The third will he a total Eclipse of the Sun, July 7, invisible to all the United 
States. The path of Total Phase passes through part of Spain, the south ol 
France, the north of Italy, Austria, Russia, Tartary, Chinese Tartary, and Chi- 
na, to the Pacific Ocean. At the northwest part of this continent, a partial 
Eclipse will be visible. 

The fourth will be a partial Eclipse of the Moon, which will take place in the 
morning of July 23, invisible to the northeast part of the Union, but visible to 
the South and W.: = t. 

Eclipse begins D. H. M. Moon sets, H. M. 

At Norfolk, Va., S3 4 39 m 4 53 rn. 

At Charleston, S. C 33 4 26 m 5 10 m. 

The fifth will be an annular Eclipse of the Sun, December 31, invisible in all 
North America. The line of central and annular Phase will pass through the 
central part of South America, and over the Pacific Ocean. 



The Planet VENUS will be Morning Star, from the beginning of the year to 
its superior conjunction with the Sun, March 5. From this, to its interior con- 
junction, December 18, it will be Evening Star; and from this, to the end of the 
year, it will be Morning Star. JUPITER will be Morning Star, from the begin- 
ning of the year, to its opposition, July 10, and thence Evening Star, to the end 
of the year. MARS will be Evening Star, from the beginning of the year to its 
conjunction, June 25; and from thence to the end of the year, Morning Star. 
VENUS will be at its greatest brilliancy, November 13. 



BEGINNING AND LENGTH OF THE SEASONS. 



Spring begins, 1842, March 20th, • 

Summer " " June 31st, ..•».. 

Autumn, " " September 22d, • 

Winter, " " December 21st, • 

Length of the tropical year, commencing at the winter solstice, 
18-11, and terminating" at the winter solstice, 1842, - | 

Mean or average length of the tropical year, 



h. 

7 13 14 

4 20 52 

18 25 

II 54 

(1. lu 771. 

365 6 6 



23 
365 5 48 48 



Longest and Shortest Days in the principal Cities of the U. S. 
Names of Places. L.D. S. D. Names of Places. L.D.\S.D. 



North part of the U. S, 
Portland, - 
Boston and Detroit, 
New York, 
Baltimore, 



L.D. 


S. D. 


16 53.5 


7 r,r, 


15 15.7 


3 44. 1 


15 fi.4 


8 53 6 


14 55.5 


9 4.5 


14 46.8 


9 13.2 



Cincinnati, 

Washington, 

Charleston, 

New Oi leans, 

South part of the U. S, 



14 45.4 
14 43.8 
14 10.2 
13 55-8 
13 32.1 



9 14.6 
9 16.2 
9 49.4 
10 412 
10 273 



4 Feasts, etc. of the Catliolic 


t'lnircli. 




[.The Jig 


ures denote the days of the month.'] 




JANUARY. 


7 


St. Stanislaus. 




SEPTEMBER. 




1 


ZJircumcis. of our Lord. 


■ i 


St. Greg. Nazianzen. t . 


l 


St Egidius. 







Epipli. of our Lord. 
St. Hilary. 


10 


St Antoninus. 


•2 


St. Stephen. 




u 


i:; 


St. Pius V. 


5 


St Law rence Justin. 






St. Paul, lirst hermit. 


i:. 


Whit Sunday or Peat. 


8 


Nativity of the BVM. 




17 


St. Anthony. 


::; 


St. Paschal Bay Ion. * 


1(1 


St. Nich. of Tolentino. 




18 


St. Peter's Chair at It. 


24 


St. Venantiue. 


14 


Exalt, of the Cross. 




19 


St. Canute. 


_•■. 


St. Gregory, VII. 


16 


Cornelius and Cyp. 




20 


S.S. Fabian and Sebast. 


:<< 


Corpus ChristL 


17 


Stigmas of St. Francis. 




'21 


St. Agnes. 




JUNE. 


19 


SS. Januar. and Com. 




22 


SS. Vine, and Anastas. 


3 


Sacred Heait of Jesus. 


.'ii 


SS. Eust and Comp. 




24 


St. Timothy. 


i 


St. Francis Caracciojp. 


22 


St Thos. of Villanova. 




'25 


Conversion of St Paul. 


6 


St. Norbert. 


2i. 


St Jos. of Cupertino. 




26 


St. Polycarp. 

St. John Chrysostora. 


7 


St. Peter Cielestin. ' 


27 


SS. Cosmas and Dam. 






E 


St. Philip Neri. L. 


28 


St. Wenceslaus. 




28 


St. Marcellus. 


g 


SS. Nereus and Cordp, 


30 


St. Jerom. 




29 


St. Francis of Sales. 


in 


St. Marg. Q. ofSco* 




OCTOBER. 




'31 


St. Peter Nolasco. 


1 1 


St. Barnabas. 

St. Anthony of Padua. 


1 


St Remigius. 






FEBRUARY. 


l.; 


3 


The Guaidian Angels. 




1 


St. Ignatius. 
Pur. of the BVM. 


11 


St. Basil the Great | 


4 


St Francis. 






1.-, 


St. Ubaldus. 


5 


SS. Placid, and Comp. 




3 


St. Raymond de Pen. 


16 


St Bernard in. 


6 


St. Bruno. 




4 


St. Andrew of Corsica. 


n 


St. M. Magd. Pazzis, V. 


7 


St Mark. 




5 


St. Agatha. 


jn 


St. Silvenus. 


8 


St. Bridget. 




7 


St. Romauld. 


J J 


St. Paulinus. 


in 


St. Francis Borgia. 






St. John of Hatha. 


::, 


St. William. 


11 


SS. Dion, and Comp. 




9 


Ash-Wednesday. 


i\\ 


SS. Peter and St. Paul. 


13 


St Edward. 




11 


Of. of the pas. of our L. 

St. Martina. 




JULY. 


14 


St. Callixtus. 




12 


2 


Vis. of the BVM. 


1.-. 


St. Theresa. 






St. Pet. Ch. at Antioch. 


8 


St. Elizab. Q. of Port. 


17 


St. Hedwigis. 




24 


St. Matthias. 


11 


The Seven Brothers. 


18 


St. Luke Evang. 






Spr. and NIs. of our L. 
MARCH. 


12 


St. John Gualbert 


19 


St. Peter of Alcantara. 






13 


St. Anacletus. 


2(1 


St. John Cantius. 




4 


Of. of the 5 Wnds. of L. 


1 l 


St. Bonaventure. 


21 


St. Hilarion. 




5 


St. Cassimir. 


i:. 


St. Henry. 


25 


SS. Crys. and Darias. 




7 


St. Ts. of Aquin. 
St. John of God. 


16 


Our lady of Mt Carm. 


26 


St. Evaristus. 




8 


18 


St. Camillus of Lelli. 


28 


S. Simon and Jude. 




9 


St. Frances. 


19 


St. Vincent of Paul. 




NOVEMBER. 




10 


The40Mart.ofSebaste. 


20 


St. Jerom JEmilian. 


1 


All Saints. 




11 


Of.ofM.Prec.Bld.ofL. 


21 


St. Alexius. 


.' 


Com. of All Souls. 




12 


St Gregory the Great. 


22 


St Mary Magd. Penit. 


10 


St. Andrew Avellino. 




17 


St. Patrick. 


.':' 


St. Apollinaris. 


11 


St. Martin. 




IS 


SevenDotoursofBVM. 


25 


St. James, Ap. 


II 


St. Didacus. 




19 


St J os. Spouse of BVM. 

Good Friday. 
Easter Sunday. 


26 


St Ann, moth, of BVM. 


15 


St. Gertrude. 




25 


27 


St. Pantaleon. 


17 


St. Greg. Thaumat. 




27 


28 


SS. Nazarius and Cels. 


L'.l 


St. Elizabeth. 






APRIL. 


J;, 


St. Martha, V. 


.'1 


Present, of the BVM. 




4 


Annunciation. 




AUGUST. 


22 


St. Cecilia. 




5 


St. Vincent Ferrier. 


1 


St. Peter's Chains. 


23 


St. Clement. 




6 


St Benedict 


2 


St Alphonsus LiguorL 


■24 


St. John of the Cross. 




7 


St. Francis of Paula. 


! 


Kind, relics of St. Step. 


25 


St. Catharine. 




8 


St Isidore. 


1 


St. Dominie. 


30 


St. Andrew. 




11 


St. Leo. 


6 


Transf. of our Lord. 




DECEMBER. 




13 


St. Hermenegild. 


8 


SS. Cyriacus, etc. 


2 


St Bibiana. 




14 
21 


SS. Tiburt and Comp. 
St. Anselm. 


10 
12 


St. Lawrence. 
St. Clare, N. 


5 


St. Francis Xavier. 
St. Pet.Chrysologus. 






SS. Soter and Caius. 


L5 


Assnmp. of the BVfll. 


6 


St. Nicholas. 




23 


St. George. 


16 


St. Hyacinth. 


7 


St Ambrose. 




25 


St. Mark Evang. 


Jii 


St. Bernard. 


12 


St. Damascus. 
St. Lucy. 




20 


SS. Cletusaud Marcel. 


: i 


St Bartholomew. 


13 




'2.S 


St. Vitalis. 


_•; 


St. Lewis. 


21 


St. Thomas. 




29 


St. Peter. 


21 


St. .1. Fran, de Chant. 


25 


Christmas. 




30 


St Catharine of Sienna. 


27 


St. Jos. Calasanctius. 


20 


St. Steph. Protomar. 
St, John Evang. 






MAY. 


29 


Behead, of St John B. 


27 




6 


Ascension of our Lord. 


:;i 


St. Rose of Lima. 


28 


H. Innocents. 




1 6 


St. John.Ap.b. Lat.gt. 


31 


St. Raym. Nomiatus- 


.".i 


St.Thomas. 





Sundays, &c. of * lie Episcopal Churcli. 



ii Day* observed by thi Protestant 

W M K/iisi- pal i 'hurch. 



J A N C A K V. 
Circumcision of our Lord. 
ii Sundaj aftei Christmas. 
Epiphany of our Lord. 
; Sundaj after Epiphany. 
,i Sun. 1. 1\ after Epiphany. 

S.yt 'I i _:• - - i 1 1 i-t Sundaj . 

Conversion of St. Paul 

una Sunday. 

v v. a r a ,v u v. 

Purification of Virgin Mary. 
Quinquagesima Sunday. 
Fast, Lsb Wednesday. 

1st Sunday in Lent. 

Ember day. 

Ember daj . 

Ember day. 

jil Sunday in Lent. 

St. Matthias, apostle and mart. 

:5d Sunday in Lent. 

H A RCH. 
lih Sunday in Lent. 
.">th Sunday in Lent. 
6th Sund. in Lent, or Palm S. 
Monday before E ister. 
Tuesday before Easter. 
Wednesday before Easter. 
Thursday before Easter. 
Good Friday. Annunciation 
piaster evening. [B. Virgin. 

Easter day. 

Monday in Easter week. 
Tuesday in Easter week. 

APRIL. 
1st S. after Easter, or Low S. 
■2d Sunday alter Easter. 
3d Sunday after Easter. 
-Ith Sundaj' after Easter. 
St. Mark, evang. and martyr. 

M A Y . 
5tb S. after Easter, or Rog'n S. 

St. Philip and St. James. 
Fast. Kogation day. 
Fast. Rotation day. 
Fast. Rogation day. 
Holy Thurs. Ascension day. 
Sunday after Ascension. 
Whitsunday. 

Monday in Wllitsunday week. 
Tuesday in Whitsunday week. 
Fast. Ember day. 
Ember day. 
Fast. Ember day. 
Trinity Sunday. 
1st Sunday after Trinity. 

JUNE. 
2d Sunday after Trinity. 
St. Barnabas, apost. and martyr 
3d Sunday after Trinity. 
4th Sundav after Trinity. 
Nativity of St. John, Baptist. 
5th Sunday after Trinity. 
St. Peter, apostle and martyr. 



I) jjn'i.s obterved by tin: frottttant 
\I Episcopal Church. 



J ULY. 

6th Sundaj after Trinity. 
7th Sunday after Trinity. 
8th Sunday after Trinity. 
9th Sunday after Trinity. 
St. James, the apostle and mar- 

tj r. 
10th Sunday after Trinity. 

AUGUST. 
11th Sundaj after Trinity. 
12th Sunday after Trinity. 
21 l:;th Sunday after Trinity. 

St. Bartholomew, an apostle and 

mart j r. 

L4th Sunday after Trinity. 

SEPTE M B E R. 

16th Sunday after Trinity. 

Itith Sunday after Trinity. 

17th Sunday after Trinity. 

Fast. St. Matthew, apostle and 

evangelist. Ember day. 

23 Ember day. 

4 Fast. Ember day. 
26|18th Sundaj' after Trinity. 

5t. Michael, Archangel, and all 
Angels. 

OCTOBER. 
19th Sunday after Trinity. 
■20th Sunday after Trinity. 
■21st Sunday after Trinity. 
St. Luke, evangelist. 
2-2d Sunday after Tiinity. 
St. Simon and St. Jude 

ties and martj rs. 
2.3d Sunday after Trinity. 
NO VE M B ER. 
ill Saints' day. 
■24th Sunday after Trinity. 
2oth Sunday alter Trinity, Coll. 
Ep. and Gospel, one of the 
Sun. after Ep. 
28th Sunday after Trinity. Coll. 
Ep. and Gospel, for the 25th 
Sunday Trinity. 
1st Sunday in Advent. 
St. Andrew, apostle and martyr. 

DECEMBER 
■2d Sunday in Advent. 
3d Sunday in Advent. 
Fast. Ember day. 
Ember day. 
Fast. Ember day. 
4th Sunday in Advent. 
St. Thomas, apostle and martyr, 
Christmas day. 
St. Stephen, first martyr. 
St. John, the apostle and evan 

gelist. 
The holy Innocent's day. 



apos 



Note, — Fast every Friday, and 
every day in Lent except Sun- 
days. 



J6 184-2. JANUARY, 1st. Month, begins on Saturday. 




■ . 


. - ' su 


I-li ISES OF THE MOON. 
Phases. day. hr. min. 

Last Quarter,. . . 3d 5 

New Moon, . . . 11th 11 11 M. 

First Quarter, . . 19th 2 56 A. 




W± 




Full Moon,. . . . 26th If, \. 




1 Moon, Apogee 13th. Perigee 27th. 




I). 


of the £>'""»> ■"•.•! 


''- Sun's Moon 1 Moon II JANUARY, 18fl. 




M. 


Week. 


Si i 


daj s. 


del;. 


K. £ .-. 




Winds, Weather, etc. 




No 

1 


Name. 

Sat 


h. in. 
7 20 


h. m. 
4 40 


h. m. 
9 20 


23 1 


h. m. 
L0 22 


h. m. 


IV- .1 


at 6 A. M. and [) P. >t. 




30 


35 


V. K. hail, snow. 




2 


s 


7 19 


4 11 


9 22 


22 :s 


11 30 


4 37 


23 


22 


N. W. cloudy. 




3 


Mon 


719 


4 11 


9 22 


22 50 


morn 


5 25 


l: 


11 


N. W. fair. 




4 


Tue 


7 18 


4 42 


9 24 


22 44 


1 3 


6 13 


7 


12 


S. E. hazy. fair. 




5 


Wed 


7 18 


4 42 


9 24 


22 37 


2 7 


7 2 


1. 


19 


N.E. cloudy, rain. 




6 


Thu 


7 17 


4 43 


9 26 


2-2 31 


3 11 


7 52 




30 


E. rained all day. 




7 


Frid 


7 17 


4 43 


9 -26 22 23 


4 9 


8 44 


■ 


42 


S. E. rainy day. 




8 


Sat 


7 16 


4 44 


9 28 22 15 


5 3 


9 37 


41 


40 


N. fair, cloudy. 




9 


s 


7 16 


1 41 


9 28 


22 7 


5 56 


lo :<o 


38 


37 


N. fair, cloudy. 




10 


Mon 


7 15 


4 45 


9 30 


2158 


6 44 


11 20 


36 


36 


E. cloudy, rain. 




11 


Tue 


7 14 


4 48 


932 


21 49 


sets. 


12 10 


36 


> 


S. E. rain. fair. 




12 


Wed 


7 14 


4 46 


9 32 


2140 


5 55 


12 57 


38 


37 


W. fair, cloudy. 




13 


Thu 


7 14 


4 46 


9 32 


21 30 


6 59 


1 42 


36 


34 


N. cloudy, snow. 




14 


Frid 


7 13 


4 47 


934 


2119 


7 50 


2 23 


34 


32 


N. E. cloudy, rain. 




15 


Sat 


7 12 


4 48 


9 36 


21 8 


8 46 


3 3 


32 


34 


N. E. cloudy. 




16 


s 


7 11 


4 49 


9 38 


20 56 


9 42 


3 42 


:;■• 


32 


S. E. cloudy, rain. 




17 


Mon 


7 10 


4 50 


9 40 20 45 


10 31 


4 22 


34 


36 


S. E. rain. hazy. 




18 


Tue 


7 9 


4 51 


9 42|20 33 


11 29 


5 4 


30 


22 


N. W. fair. hazy. 




19 


Wed 


7 9 


4 51 


9 42 


20 20 


morn 


5 49 


18 


18 


W. fair, cloudy. 




20 


Thu 


7 8 


4 52 


9 44 


20 8 


52 


6 56 


is 


20 


N. snow. rain. 




21 


Frid 


7 8 


4 52 


9 44 


19 54 


1 48 


7 47 


28 


•}{> 


N. W. rain. 




22 


Sat 


7 7 


4 53 


946 


19 41 


2 57 


8 36 


30 


2- 


N. W. clou. snow. 




23 


s 


7 7 


4 53 


9 46 


19 27 


3 52 


9 27 


29 


30 


N.W. cloudy, fair. 




24 


Mon 


7 6 


4 54 


9 48 


19 13 


4 38 


10 18 


30 


32 


S. E. cloudy, fair. 




25 


Tue 


7 5 


4 55 


9 50 


18 57 


5 40 


11 19 


30 


36 


S. W. fair." 




26 


Wed 


7 4 


4 56 


9 52 


18 42 


rises. 


mom 


32 


34 


S. E. fair, cloudy. 




27 


Thu 


7 3 


4 57 


9 54 


18 27 


5 53 


12 36 


:m 


37 


S. E. rain. fair. 




28 


Frid 


7 2 


4 58 


9 56 


18 11 


7 11 


1 36 


36 


38 


S. E. hazy. clou. 




29 


Sat 


7 


5 


10 


17 55 


8 34 


2 37 


37 


36 


N. E. rain, cloudy. 




30 


s 


6 59 


5 1 


10 2 


17 39 


9 34 


3 17 


35 


34 


W. cloudy, fair. 




31 


Mon 


6 58 


5 2 


10 4 


17 23 


10 44 


4 7 


:<2 


33 


S. W. cloudy. 




Directions fur the C 


ultivatii.it a.iJ 3i.,i, < ', < ,;eni <;t' h'h.w rx—t'ir January. 




Flowers and plants 


reared in rooms should not be confined in the dark. The 




rooms should he liti'lit 


and airy, and the plants placed in the sun as much as pos- 




Bible. They should b« 


potted in a suitable soil, and carefully watered. The pot 




must be of a size to s 


lit the plant, and the mould moderately moistened. The 




temperature of the ro 


un should range from 40 to GO degrees. Cape bulbs should 




he put in early in t 


lis month. Hyacinths, Jonquils, Ixias, Laehenallas will 




Bower early, if plentii 


Lilly watered and properly attended. Azaleas, Rhododen- 




dron Rose.*, At., may 


be forced by heat. The Camellia Japonica will swell and 




blomn if carefully mai 


aged. Nareissas, Tulips, &.c, will flourish iu a room with 




fire, if kept near a wir 


dow. The water in the glasses should l.e changed once or 




twice a week, and the 


' should be turned frequently to prevent them from grow- 




ing to one side. Care 


must be taken to destroy the inserts which are constantly 




appearing. 







CASH ACCOUNT. 



MEMORANDA, &<: I'm; .1 if I UlY, L84S 



! PAID. IIRECEIVED 



IP. 1:1.1 I. 












FEBRUARY, 2d Month, begins on Tuesday. 



Moon's Phases. 

Last Quarter, 
New Moon, . 
First Quarter, 
Full Moon, . 




PHASES OF THE MOON. 



day, hr. 

2d 5 

10th 6 

18th 6 

24th 11 



mm. 
22 M 
50 M 
36 M 
11 A, 



Apogee loth. Perigee 80th. 



FEBRUARY, Ml. 



"Winds, Weather, etc 
ut i, A.M. and 9 P.M. 



N.E.rain. cloudy 

S. E. cloudy, fair, 

S. W. fair. 

N. W. fair, hazy, 

N. fair. hazy. 

Calm, cloudy. 

N. E. clou. snow. 

N. W. fair. 

S. Ev snowed all 

N. W. fair. [day. 

W. snow in P. M. 

W. fair. [fair. 

N. W. fair. 

N. hazy. fair. 

N. W.'fair. 

S. W. fair. 

E. cloudy. 

N. E. cloudy. 

S. W. fair. 

N. W. fair. 

S. E. fair, cloudy. 

N. E. hazy. fair". 

W. fair, cloudy. 

N. E. snow. fair. 

S. cloudy. 

£. E. hazy. rain. 

N. W. rain. fair. 

N. W. fair. 



Directions for the Cultivatim and Management o/ Flowers-for February 
elevate 1 in , l r„"Tii r rT ,re !,ssiduo, 1 ,s -ittention. In the n, S ;ht they should 'be 
•^p.'ted m the middle of the room, and the windows should he cnr-l dlv ch^d 
The temperature of the room should not be allowed to fall below 10 de'rees If' 

t un^hZZT* i e f\ hi ' a f ir , e '? an a, 'i < """ 1 g r °°»>- Charcoal should not 
he put in the room to heat it, as it darkens the foliage and hardens the „!■!»,< 
The green fly that attacks the roses must be destroyed. Hvar„,tl,s ,,d ' ' ,' 
bulbs must be regularly attended in tying up, <fcc. CamelHas v die ^ ay h 
vaned heaut.es Ins month, and new varieties may be obtained In ',, , " 
ram, an; pencil, an putting „ on the ,',,,„, „ r polleu from t »%* „ f » V * 
«hi,h ,s a yellow substance, on the anthers; with this on the pencil .lust - 
lightly on the stiles of those intended to carry seed; the heat mus't ' tl h,,.', 
p.ope.ly, admitting the a.r at every favorable opportunity, and watering fre v 
They must be frequently sponged, which destros the red s, d,, t 1 "a tu I s 
them. Geraniums and other soft-wooded plants re,p„re a httle more w , tl ■ 
the close of this month. Succulents seldom i 



rards 



dom need 



that attaH 
ire v 
uch water. 



CASH ACCOUNT. 



MEMORANDA, &c. FOR FEBRUARY', l«4i 
















PAID. RECEIVED 



**o if 









1 






10 1842. MARC] 


4, 3d Month, begins on Tuesday. 


M *'. 




PHASES OF THE MOON. 


'"-■-- 




Moon's Phases. day. hr. min. 


i$i - *H, jS^l 


'- v ' v 


Last Quarter, . . 3d 8 18 A. 




New Moon, . • . 12th 1 24 A. 


gifeSifeii : '^*^'lfftiEJfi^ 




Fist Quarter, . . 19th 6 37 A. 


^P^^S 


w 


Full Moon, . . . 26th 8 52 M. 


nvfoon, Apogee 8th. Perigee 23d. 


D. 

M. 


Oays SUN L'gtli 


Sun's 
decli. 
south. 


Moon 
R.&S. 


Moon 

south. 


MARC H, 184E 


of the 
Week. 


[vises ami 
Sets. 


days. 


Tem. 


Winds, Weather, etc. 
at 6 A. M. and 9 P. M. 
S. W. hazy. fair. 


1 


Name. 

T ue 


li. m. 
8 24 


5 36 


h. in. 

11 12 


7 33 


h. m 
10 47 


h. m. 

3 38 


3«; 


44 


2 


Wed 


6 2S 


5 37 


11 14 


7 13 


11 56 


4 32 


11) 


45 


S. E. fair, cloudy. 


3 


Tim 


6 21 


5 39 


11 18 


6 47 


morn 


5 28 


42 


41 


N. E. cloudy, fair. 


4 


Prid 


6 20 


5 40 


1120 


6 24 


1 52 


6 22 


40 


12 


N. fair, cloudy. 


5 


Sat 


6 20 


j 40 


1120 


5 


2 45 


7 15 


32 


29 


N. E. cloudy. 


6 


s 


619 


5 41 


11 22 


5 36 


3 27 


8 5 


28 


32 


N. W. snow. rain. 


7 


IWon 


618 


5 42 


11 24 


5 13 


4 2 


8 52 


34 


38 


W. fair, cloudy. 


8 


Tue 


6 16 


5 44 


11 28 


4 50 


4 31 


9 37 


38 


:!.-, 


N. W. cloudy. 


9 


Wed 


6 15 


5 45 


1130 


4S6 


5 


10 20 


34 


33 


S. E. fair. 


10 


Tim 


6 14 


5 46 


11 3-2 


4 3 


5 22 


11 1 


36 


:ci 


IV. snow. rain. 


11 


Frid 


6 12 


5 48 


1135 


3 39 


5 44 


11 41 


32 


37 


N. E. cloudy. 


12 


Sat 


6 11 


5 49 


1138 


3 16 


sets. 


ev.22 


3-1 


::o 


S.W. cloudy, rain. 


13 


s 


6 10 


5 50 


11 40 


2 52 


6 40 


1 3 


32 


:>,:> 


W. cloudy. 


14 


Mon 


6 8 


5 59 


1144 


2 29 


7 5 


1 45 


34 


37 


N. W. hazy. fair. 


15 


Tue 


6 7 


5 53 


1146 


2 5 


8 8 


2 31 


30 


:;o 


N. E. fair, cloudy. 


16 


Wed 


6 6 


5 54 


1148 


141 


9 35 


3 21 


32 


2* 


N. E. cloudy. 


17 


Thu 


6 4 


5 56 


11 52 


118 


10 35 


4 13 


26 


26 


N. W. snowed all 


18 


Frid 


6 3 


5 57 


1154 


54 


11 36 


5 9 


26 


30 


S. W. clou. [day. 


19 


Sat 


6 2 


5 58 


1156 


30 


morn 


6 7 


34 


42 


N. W. fair. 


20 


s 


6 


5 


12 


16 


1 37 


7 6 


:i8 


.72 


E. fair, cloudy. 


21 


Mon 


5 59 


5 1 


12 2 


16 


2 22 


8 5 


52 


55 


S.E. fair, [light'g. 


2-2 


Tue 


5 58 


6 2 


12 4 


40 


3 2 


9 1 


46 


47 


W.fair. clou'yand 


23 


Wed 


5 56 


6 4 


12 8 


1 4 


3 38 


9 55 


47 


46 


S. E. cloud v. fair. 


24 


Thu 


5 55 


6 5 


12 10 


127 


4 9 


10 47 


42 


4H 


S. E. fair. 


25 


Frid 


5 54 


6 6 


12 12 


151 


4 38 


11 38 


44 


51 


S. E. fair. 


26 


Sat 


5 5-2 


6 8 


12 16 


2 14 


rises. 


morn 


48 


56 


S. E. fair, cloudy. 


27 


s 


5 51 


6 9 


12 18 


2 38 


7 17 


12 30 


54 


60 


S. E. fair, cloudy. 


28 


Mon 


5 50 


6 10 


12 20 


3 1 


8 22 


1 23 


58 


60 


S. E. cloudy. 


29 


Tue 


5 49 


6 11 


12 22 


3 25 


9 35 


2 18 


54 


4S 


E. rained all day. 


30 


Wed 


5 48 


6 13 


12 23 


3 48 


10 36 


3 14 


48 


46 


N. E. fair, cloudy. 


31 


Thu 


5 46 


6 14 


12 28 


4 11 


11 35 


4 9 


•12 


44 


S. E. fair, cloudy. 


Directions for ike Cultii 


alien and Management of Flowers— -for March. 


The air may now be mor 


e freely admitted to the plants, as the weather is 


milder than in the farmer mc 


nths. They will require a little more water. Ca- 


mellias must be treated as tl 


ey were last month. Oranges and Lemons must not 


be kept too wet. It is a bac 


practice to bore lioles in the tubs and half barrels in 


which they are placed. If 


Myrtles and Oleanders are irifetted with insects, 


they must be scrubbed with 


a strong decoction of tobacco, heated to about 100 


.degrees, wash them afterwai 


ds with soap and water. Geraniums must be kept 


airy, and not too much cro\ 


vded. Lachenaleas, Oxalis, Ixias, Gladiolus, Wat- 


somas, Babianas, &c, must 


be kept-near the glass. The flower stems of Hya- 


cinths, Tulips, Narcissas, &( 


., must be tied up to small stakes. This month is 


the best for repotting Cape 


vnd New Holland plants. Acacias, Erias, Leptos- 


permum, Epaeris, &c, mus 


t not be deferred. Primulas should have an airy 


exposure. 





CASH ACCOUNT. 



MKMOKAND.V, &c. FOR MS.KUH, 1-1J. 



12 




L8 


•2. i 


\i»R! 


,.4tl 


Month, begins 


Oil 


Friday. 


i&1y&^\ 


PHASES OF THE MOON. 


Moon's Phases. day. Hr. min. 


Last Quarter, . . 2d 1 25 A. 


,;/;■;; -/. : ,, 


New Moon. . . . 10th 5 27 A. 


First Quarter, . . 18th 1 28 M. 


Isii^rv Sm^F!/ 


Full .Moon,. . . . 2!th 6 23 A. 


^^^^^^SsS^-- 


Moon, Apogee 5th. Perigee 21st. 


D. 


Days 

of the 

VVVi'k. 


SUN 

Rises and 

Sets. 


of 

d n s. 


Sun ■ 

decli. 
north. 

4 34 






APRIL, 1841. 


M. 

No 
1 


R.&S. 


south. 


Tern. 


Winds, Weather, etc- 


.Vain,-. 

Frid 


h. m. 
5 45 


h.m- 
6 15 


II. HI 

12 30 


morn 


I.. Ml. 

5 4 




44 


50 


S. E. cloudy, fair. 


2 


Sat 


5 44 


6 IB 


12 32 


4 57 


1 25 


5 57 


48 


54 


S. E. fair, thund'r. 


3 


S 


5 43 


6 17 


12 34 


5 20 


1 59 


6 !,; 


47 


18 


N. W. fair. hazy. 


4 


Mon 


5 42 


<i L8 


12 36 


5 43 


•2 35 


7 33 


4fi 


46 


S. E. cloudv. 


i) 


Tue 


5 40 


6 20 


12 40 


6 6 


3 


8 16 


46 


52 


W. cloudv. rain. 


6 


Wed 


5 39 


6 21 


12 42 


6 29 


3 26 


8 59 


5(1 


52 


N. W. rain. fair. 


V 


Tim 


5 38 


6 22 


12 44 


6 52 


3 49 


9 3s |s 


52 


S. E. cloudv. fair. 


8 


Frid 


5 37 


6 2:1 


12 46 


7 14 


4 26 


If) 19 ;,0 


52 


IV. rain. fair. 


9 


Sat 


5 36 


6 24 


12 48 


7 36 


5 24 


10 59 


Is 


58 


S. W. cloudv. 


10 


S 


5 35 


6 25 


12 50 


7 58 


sots. 


11 43 


54 


42 


N. E. clou. snow. 


1! 


Mon 


5 33 


6 27 


12 54 


8 20 


7 29 


ev.28 


Id 


42 


IV. E. fair, cloudy. 


L2 


Tue 


5 32 


6 28 


12 56 


8 42 


8 32 


1 16 


38 


31 


N. E. snow. clou. 


13 


Wed 


5 31 


6 29 


12 58 


9 4 


9 34 


2 9 


35 


13 


N. W. cloudy. 


14 


Tim 


5 30 


6 30 


13 


9 25 


10 34 


3 4 


42 


44 


IV. W. sho'rs. fair. 


1.. 


Frid 


5 29 


6 31 


13 2 


9 47 


11 32 


4 2 


40 


II 


N. fair. 


16 


Sat 


5 27 


6 33 


13 6 


10 8 


morn 


4 59 


40 


48 


S. fair, cloudv. 


l< 


8 


5 26 


6 34 


13 8 


10 29 


29 


5 58 


48 


5 1 


S. W. rain. clou. 


18 


Mon 


5 2o 


6 35 


13 10 


10 50 


1 13 


6 53 


> 


56 


N. W. clou 1 y. fair. 


lit 


Tue 


5 21 


6 36 


13 12 


1111 


1 57 


7 46 


50 


.51 


N. W. fair. 


l 2!l 


Wed 


5 23 


6 37 


13 14 


11 32 


2 30 


8 35 


52 


.50 


S. E. hazy. clou. 


21 


Tim 


5 22 


6 38 


13 16 


1 1 50 


2 58 


9 27 


51 


50 


N. W. rain. clou. 


■22 


Frid 


5 2i) 


6 40 


13 20 


12 13 


3 28 


10 17 


15 


18 


N.E. cloudv". rain. 


•2!! 


Sat 


5 19 


6 41 


13 22 


12 33 


4 


11 1 


50 


54 


IV. E. rain. fair. 


•2! 


s 


518 


6 42 


13 24 


12 50 


rises. 


morn 


53 


58 


S. E. (air. 


■2:. 


Vion 


5 16 


6 43 


13 26 


13 12 


7 18 


2 


58 


6-2 


E. cloudy, fair. 


■2:; 


Tue 


5 16 


6 44 


13 28 


13 30 


8 19 


58 


50 


CO 


E. cloudy, fair. 


27 


Wed 


515 


6 45 


13 30 


13 51 


9 23 


1 55 


50 


58 


N. W. rain. fair. 


•2* 


Tim 


5 13 


6 47 


13 34 


1410 


10 20 


2 52 


50 


56 


S. hazy. fair. 


•2!* 


Frid 


5 12 


6 48 


13 36 


14 29 


11 12 


3 46 


51 


18 


S. E. rain, cloudv- 


30 


Sat 


5 11 


6 49 


13 3,-: 


14 37 


11 42 


4 38 


47 


48 


N. W. cloudy. 



I Hr, ni'msjor the CuUwation and Managi merit <</' t'litifos—fnr April. 
The sun becomes too powerful this month to ha\ e the plants much exposed to 
it. An eastern exposure is better than a southern. Plants now suffer most from 
want of air and water. Keep Chinese Roses and Geraniums near the light. 
Plants kept in the cellar during winter, such as Pomegranates, Eagorstricmias. 
Hydrangeas, Oleanders, Sweet Bags, <fcc, must be brought out into the open air 
about the middle of the month. Oranges and Lemons will begin to flower, and 
must have air. Geraniums must be kept five or six feet from" the glass. Prim- 
roses, Azaleas, and Rhododendrons should be kept as much as possible in the 
shade. Calla Ethiopica require to stand in water while in bloom. Tie up the 
r4iml>ing plants. Hot-house plants will not sutler with heat of 100 degrees. 
Plants of the Cactese tribe require repotting; the bottom of every pot must be 
covered with an inch of pot shreds, or rough gravel, for drainage. Flowering 
stocks that h;,ve been kept in the green-house may be planted out in beds. Se- 
lect those intended for seed, and plant the different kinds separately. 



CASH ACCOUNT. 



MKMOKANDA, &c. FOR APRIL, 1842 



]<i:i i:i\ •!•!) 









[ I 1 L842. MAY, 4th Month, begins on Sunday. 






i 11 i.SES OF THE MOON. 




vW 


Moon's Phases. day. hr. inin. 






Last Quarter, ... 2d 7 40 M. 




'•>'■'$ - 


.'<>;) 10th 6 32 r.I. 




■-:. :.■"■■::£' ■'■<■-: 


First Quarter, . . . 17th 7 4 M. 




1 ;U— /• ■-■■;.. -,-^^K 


o »n 24th 4 33 M. 




lpo.3d. Peri. 17th. Apo.31st. 




M. 

1 5° 

1 


of the 
Week 


i . 


l/vtb 
.] iy . 


dei li. 
north. 


Moon 


Moon 


MAY, 1841. 




Tern. 


Winds, V."< ath r, i tci 
it 6 \. M.and 9 P. M. 




Name. 

s 


h. i.i. 
5 LI 


h. m. 
6 50 


'' 


15 5 


b. m. 

morn 


h. m 

5 2f. 




17 


51 


\. W. hazy. fair. 




! 2 


Mon 


5 £ 


6 •")! 


1 3 42 


15 23 


i I' 


6 12 


48 


48 


8. E. cloud)-, lair. 






Tue 


5 > 


.3 52 


13 44 


15 41 


1 57 


6 54 


15 


!' 


V W. fair. 




4 


Wed 


5 'i 




13 46 


15 58 


2 27 


7 35 


1! 


50 


IV. W. fair. 




5 


Thu 


5 G 


3 5 i 


L3 48 


16 L5 




8 15 


16 


48 


E. hazy, rain. 




(5 


Prid 


5 5 


6 55 


13 51 


16 32 


3 24 


8 55 


48 


54 


N.W. cloudy, fair, 


i 


1- 7 


Sat 


5 4 


6 56 


13 52 


L6 ' 


3 51 


9 51 


50 


55 


N. fair. rain. 




8 


s 


., : 


6 57 


13 5 1 


17 6 


4 19 


10 22 


50 


53 


N. E. rain. fair. 




9 


Mon 


5 S 


6 58 


13 56 


L7 22 


4 52 


11 8 


52 


57 


8. E. fair. rain. 




10 


Tue 


5 1 




L3 58 


1 7 38 


• . 


ev. 1 


56 


60 


8s E. rain, cloudy. 




11 


Wed 


5 


7 


14 


17 53 


8 24 


56 


5<s 


61 


W. fair. hazy. 




12 


Thu 




7 1 


14 2 


L8 ! 


9 24 


1 56 


58 


56 


W. rain. fair. 




! 13 


Frid 


4 5e 


7 2 


14 4 


18 24 


10 19 


2 55 


56 


54 


S. E. fair. 




14 


Sat 


■i ■<: 


7 3 


14 6 


18 38 


11 8 


3 54 


:,: 


56 


N. W. cloudy, fair. 




15 


s 


4 56 


7 4 


14 8 


L8 53 


11 47 


4 50 


5! 


58 


S. E. fair. 




16 


Mon 


4 55 


7 5 


14 10 


L9 7 


morn 


5 43 


■V 


62 


W. fair. 




17 


Tue 


4 54 


7 6 


14 12 


19 21 


52 


6 33 


58 


68 


8.W. fair, cloudy. 




18 


Wed 


4 52 


"/ 1 


ii i : 


!9 3! 


1 22 


7 22 


61) 


66 


NT. fair. 




19 


Tim 


4 52 


7 8 


14 16 


19 46 


1 56 


8 11 


63 


63 


IV. fair. 




20 


Prid 


4 52 


7 8 


! : L6 


12 59 


2 24 


9 


.">■- 


64 


E. hazy. fair. 




21 


Sat 


4 51 


7 Jj 


1 1 1 - 


20 1 1 


3 8 


9 51 


62 


72 


3. E. fair. 




22 


S 




7 10 


I 1 20 


20 23 


3 37 


10 45 


6,< 


76 


8. E. hazy, gusty. 




\'.'! 


Mon 


4 49 


; n 


14 22 


20 35 


4 17 


11 41 


74 


7? 


S. cloudy. 




21 


Tue 


1 48 


7 12 


14 24 


10 46 


rises. 


mom 


74 


78 


S. fair, cloudy. 




2r, 


Wed 


- [j 


7 12 


14 24 


>0 5< 


8 6 


38 


76 


76 


8. W. fair, cloudy. 




26 


Thu 




} i- 


L4 24 


21 8 


9 1 


1 34 


74 


70 


W. rain, cloudy. 




27 


Frid 


4 47 


7 13 


L4 25 


21 18 


9 48 


2 28 


6S 


58 


E. cloudy. 




28 


Sat 


4 47 


7 13 


14 23 


2128 


10 28 


3 18 


66 


74 


S. E. rain. fair. 




29 


s 


I i; 


7 L4 


L4 28 


2! 38 


11 


4 5 


72 


74 


S. E. cloudy, fair. 




30 


Men 


4 45 


7 15 


14 30 


21 47 


11 49 


4 49 


72 


56 


E. cloudv. 




31 


Tue 


4 45 


7 15 


14 30 


2156 


morn 


5 31 


62 


56 


N. E. fair. 




/ V .-•■ nsjur tlu- i 'ukivcti'ni and Manaaemein of Flmvcrs—for Mail, 




Geraniums now nui;!it to be removed from other plants while they are in flow- 




er, or tli- v. ill -row -j'i. nil; . In mi i' the quantity of water on ail plants ex- 




cept sui :ul nts. Or <■■■-. |. i , .:■,,.!■ i, Neriums, &c, may be brought out 




and planted in i;.; >il 1 _; : . r, ..!. Prnfirosi and Polyanthuses flourish best in 




the shade. Gasteria, Pacl ien :•■.!' ■ ■■':■■[< mlii.i!, Howarthia and Apiera 




Aloes require to be repotted. Chamserops require large pots or tubs. Gardenia, 
especially the d >u 1 flowers, may be \ 1 1 more than in the colder months. 






About the tenth of the month all plants will be able to stand exposure. The 




Laurestinus, Hydrangeas, ''■ -. Primroses, P ilyanthus, i:'., may be taken out 




on the first. Ml :'< were will brown and b ■ ome Etunted if too much exposed to 




the sun, and ai not fn iui itlj watered, 'in rth is tern aspect is now the best. 




Daphne, C in a ■" t , :•'., ;,,..:, ( m.-ibp. •'■•■ not flourish in a bright sun during 




sum per. From this to September, do not expose the shrubby plants to the sun. 





CASH ACCOUNT. 



MEtiORAN DA, &c. FOH 



i.i.i KlVEiJ 



1843. JUNE,'6th Month, begins on Wednesday. 




PHASES OJF THE MOON. 
Moon's Phases. day. lir. 



Last Quarter, 

\'< w Moon, . 
First Quarter, 
Full Moon, . 

Last Uuarter, 



1st J 45 M 



8th 5 7 

15th 11 46 

2=2(1 4 15 

30th 6 34 



Moon, Fcriaee 12th. 



M 


of the 


.S 1 

Rise 


and 


Week. 


Sots. 


\'o 


Nun.-. 


u. m 


1. Ill 


1 


Wed 


4 4. 


; i(3 


2 


Thu 


4 44 


i L6 


3 


Frid 


4 4o 


I 17 


4 


Sat 


1 42 


718 


5 


R 


4 41 


: li 


6 


Mon 


4 11 


7 It 


< 


Tue 


4 41 


7 19 


8 


Wed 


4 41 


7 19 


9 


Thu 


441 


7 19 


11! 


Frid 


4 4i- 


7 20 


1] 


Sat 


4 40 


7 20 


12 


$ 


4 40 


7 20 


13 


Mo 


4 40 


7 20 


11 


Tue 


4 40 


7 20 


15 


Wed 


4 4(1 


', 2 1 


l(i 


Thu 


4 3« 


: 2i 


17 


Frid 


1 IK, 


7 21 


18 


Sat 


4 39 


7 21 


L9 


$ 


4 39 


7 21 


20 


Mon 


4 39 


7 21 


2! 


Tue 


4 38 


7 22 


22 


Wed 


4 38 


7 22 


23 


Thu 


4 38 


7 22 


24 


Frid |4 37 


7 23 


25 


Sat 4 36 


7 24 


■>>; 


S 4 33 


7 21 


27 


Mon 4 35 


7 21 


28 


Tue 1 36 


7 24 


29 


Wed 1 4 33 


< 24 


30 


Thu 


J 36 


7 24 



day?. 



n:-2 
II 32 
14 34 
14 36 
14 38 
14 38 
14 38 
14 38 
14 38 
14 40 
14 40 
14 40 
14 40 ! 23 
14 40'23 
14 40 23 



de: |i. 

north. 


Moon 


i;.,vs. 


o , 


h. in. 


22 3 


29 


22 11 


1 12 


■>2 19 


1 59 


■22 26 


2 27 


22 33 


2 55 


22 39 


3 32 


22 46 


3 52 


22 51 


sets.- 


22 .75 


8 3 


23 1 


8 58 


23 6 


9 52 


23 10 


10 41 



Moon 

south. 



14 42 
14 42 
14 42 
14 42 

14 42 



14 11 31 
16 II 58 
19 morn 



27 
14 44 23 27 

27 
27 
2.7 
21 



14 41 
14 44 
14 46123 
14 48123 
14 48 1 23 
14 48 23 
14 48 23 
14 48 23 
14 48 23 



31 

1 1 

1 35 

2 15 

3 2 



rises. 

7 29 

8 19 

8 53 

9 24 
9 49 

10 8 
14 11 
lllll 58 



6 10 

6 50 

7 31 

8 16 

9 1 
9 56 

10 45 

11 43 
ev.44 



3 38 

4 31 

5 20 

6 8 

6 57 

7 47 

8 39 

9 33 

10 28 

11 23 
morn 

18 

1 10 

1 59 

2 44 

3 25 
4 

4 46 

5 28 



Tem. 

i & 9. 



Wind-, Weather, etc. 
at6 A. M. and 9 P. M. 



E. fair. clou. Lieht- 

N. W. fair. [nine. 

N. fair. 

N. fair. 

N. W. fair. 

E. fair. 

S. E. cloudy, fair. 

N.W.fair. cloudy. 

N. W. lair. 

N. lair. 

W. fair. 

N. E. fair, cloudy. 

E. cloudy, fair. 

E. cloudv. 

N. W. fair. 

N. fair. 

S. cloudy. 

S. E. rain. 

I\ . E. cloudy, fair. 

N. E. cloudy, fair. 

3. E. cloudy. 

S.E. rain, cloudy. 

•?.E. cloudy, gust. 

■J. E. cloudy, hazy. 

Calm. rain. clou. 

-. cloudy. 

■5. clou, showery. 

W. fair. 

V. W. fair. 

W. fair. 



Directions frl'.u ( ''i.'tir Hv-n ami \lnnu :.'', ■•ment »f b'linc.rs— -for June. 
Flowers are now in almost as much il.wger from excess of heat as they are in 
winter from the cold. The heat of the sun will soon destroj the Daphne odora. 
If the soil is drawn in the form of a cone around the stem, throw off the water 
to the edges of the pot, that the stem may he dry ahove the roots, otherwise 
mortification will be likely to take place. When the foliage of the Ixia, Oxalis, 
Laehenalia, &c, begins to decay, turn the pots on their sides; this will ripen the 
roots; and, when perfectly dr3', clear them from the soil, and wrap them up in 
paper, label them, and put. them away for planting in due season. Keep the 
plants in the open air, under an awning if possible, and, when there is no rain, 
give them a gentle sprinkling every evening; examine constantly for insects, 
and destroy them as often as they appear. Succulents of the Cactea" tribe, such 
as the Cereus, Mamallaria, and Opantia, thrive best in a partial shade and in an 
airy situation. Plants of a straggling growth should be neatly tied to rods. Give 
them regular syringes or sprinklings from a rose water pot. 



CASH ACCOUNT. 



MEMORANDA, A.. FOH JUNE, 1842. 



/ 



— — _ — 






y . >■ 



i 






ZK 



■ •- ■ /- 



- 



7 



zi: 



V' i 



_ iv 

x? 






• ^ 



i 



/ 



s 









., 







1842. JULY, 7th Month, begins on Friday. 






£r, 



PHASES OF THE MOON 
Moon's Phases. day. 



p New Moon, 
'First Quarter, 
Full Moon, . 
Last Quarter, 



8th 
14th 

22d 
30th 



ir. mm. 

1 54 M. 

4 59 A. 

5 51 M. 
9 35 M. 



WB£™=^s - g^pSP 


Moon, Apogee 25th. 


r>. 


Daye 

of the 

Week 


SUN 

Rises and 

Sets. 


L'gth 

of 

days. 


Sun's 
dec. 
north. 


Moon 
R&S. 


Moon 

south. 


JULY, 1841. 


M. 


Terr.. 


Winds, Weather, etc. 


\ n 


Name. 

Frid 


h. m 
4 40 


h m. 
7 20 


h. m. 

14 40 


23 7 


h. m. 

morn 


h. m- 
6 8 






1 


84 


84 


W. fair, cloudy. 


a 


Sat 


4 40 


7 20 


14 40 


23 3 


45 


6 52 


81 


83 


W. fair. 


3 


S 


4 41 


7 19 


1 138 


22 58 


1 47 


7 39 


76 


76 


N. E. fair. 


4 


Mon 


4 41 


7 19 


14 38 


22 53 


2 25 


8 30 


72 


74 


N. E. fair. 


5 


Tue 


4 41 


7 19 


14 38 


2-2 is 


2 57 


9 27 


72 


81 


S. E. f'r. showers. 


6 


Wed 


4 41 


7 19 


14 38 


22 42 


3 29 


10 27 


80 


84 


Calm. fair. 


7 


Thu 


4 42 


7 18 


14 36 


22 36 


4 12 


11 29 


82 


78 


E. cloudy, ram. 


8 


Frid 


4 42 


7 18 


14 36 


2-2 20 


sets. 


ev.29 


73 


74 


N. W. fair. 


9 


Sat 


4 43 


7 17 


14 34 


22 23 


8 29 


1 28 


711 


76 


Calm. fair, cloudy. 


in 


s 


4 44 


7 16 


14 32 


22 15 


9 4 


2 22 


76 


78 


S. W. cloudy, fair. 


11 


Mon 


444 


7 16 


14 32 


22 7 


9 36 


3 15 


74 


75 


W. fair, cloudy. 


12 


Tue 


444 


7 16 


14 32 


2159 


10 5 


4 5 


72 


76 


E. fair. 


13 


Wed 


4 44 


7 15 


14 30 


21 50 


10 48 


4 54 


76 


86 


S. fair. 


14 


Thu 


4 45 


7 15 


14 30 


2141 


11 20 


5 44 


S-J 


82 


S.W.fair. cloudy. 


15 


Frid 


4 45 


7 15 


14 30 


2132 


morn 


6 35 


S2 


86 


W. fair. [gust. 


L6 


Sat 


4 46 


7 14 


14 28 


2123 


5 


7 29 


s-2 


80 


N. W. fah. 


17 


s 


446 


7 14 


14 28 


2112 


55 


9 23 


76 


78 


N. fair. 


18 


Mon 


4 47 


7 13 


14 26 


20 2 


1 29 


9 18 


71 


80 


S. E. fair. 


19 


Tue 


4 47 


7 13 


14 26 


20 52 


2 9 


10 12 


76 


80 


S. E. fair. 


20 


Wed 


4 48 


7 12 


14 24 


20 41 


2 47 


11 5 


76 


8-1 


S. E. fair. 


•21 


Thu 


4 48 


7 12 


14 24 


20 29 


3 22 


11 53 


78 


82 


S. E. fair, cloudy. 


.» 


Frid 


4 49 


7 11 


14 22 


20 6 


rises. 


morn 


81) 


82 


S. E. cloudy, fair. 


23 


Sat 


4 50 


710 


14 20 


19 52 


7 40 


40 


SI) 


88 


S. fair. 


94 


S 


4 50 


7 10 


14 20 


19 40 


8 30 


1 28 


84 


88 


S. fair, cloudy. 


25 


Mon 


4 51 


7 9 


14 18 


19 27 


9 5 


2 5 


86 


86 


S. fair. rain. 


26 


Tue 


4 52 


7 8 


1416 


19 13 


9 25 


2 44 


s-2 


8(J 


N. W. fair. 


•27 


Wed 


4.53 


7 7 


14 14 


18 


10 12 


3 24 


7t; 


80 


N. fair. hazv. 


2s 


Thu 


4 54 


7 6 


14 12 


18 46 


10 40 


4 4 


7^ 


-1 


W. fair. 


29 


Frid 


4 55 


7 5 


1410 


18 31 


11 20 


4 47 


76 


78] 


N. E. fair. 


30 


Sat 


4 56 


7 4 


14 8 


1817 


11 31 


5 31 


76 


70 


S. E. cloudy, rain. 


3] 


s 


4 56 


7 4 


14 8 


18 2[ 


morn 


6 20 


72 


72] 


N. fair, cloudy. 



Directions fir the Cultivation and Management of 'Flowers— -for July . 
The only attention requsite for most plants now, is in giving water, protecting 
from the sun, and watching the insects. If there has been no rain during the 
day, give water every evening. All require plenty of water, except the Lemon, 
scented Geranium, and those kinds that are tuberose-rooted, as Ardens, Eicolor, 
Tristum, &c. These should have moderate supplies. All plants should be 
turned round once in a while to prevent them from growing to one side. Ca- 
mellias require careful watering with a rose water-pot. If the foliage of the Li- 
lium, Longiflorum, or .Taponicum, has decayed, do not water them while dor- 
mant, as they are easily injured by it. Look over the flowers every evening, and 
after dry nights, in the morning also. Look every week for insects, and, if any 
appear, 'have them destroyed immediately. After heavy rains be careful to ex- 
amine the pots, and see that no water is left standing in them to injure the roots. 
When any is found turn the pot on its side. 



CASH ACCOUNT. 



19 



MEMORANDA, &c. FOR JULY, 1842. 



j^ 









- 







— 
















1842. AUGUST, 8th Month, begins on Monday. 




PHASES OF THE MOON. 



min. 



day. 
6th 
13th 12 15 

20th 9 7 
28th 10 43 



St 


■i,.m ^ 




-T? 




m& 


1 Moon, Perigee 7 


th. Apogee 21st. 


D. 


Days 

ol'tl'ie 
Week 


SUN 

Rises and 

Sets. 


L'gth 

of 

days. 


Sim'.- 
dec. • 
north. 


Moon 
R.&S. 


Moon 
south. 


A U G U S T, 1841. 


M. 


Tern, 
o & 9 


Winds, Weather, etc. 


Iff) 


Name. 

Mon 


457 


h.m. 
7 3 


h. m. 
14 6 


18 2 


b. m. 
1 46 


h. m. 
7 13 


at 6 A. M. and 9 P. M. 


1 


68 


38 


N. cloudy, fair. 


2 


Tue 


4 58 


7 2 


14 4 


17 47 


2 31 


8 19 


6€ 


74 


N. fair. 


3 


Wed 


4 59 


7 1 


14 2 


17 31 


3 27 


9 10 


70 


76 


N. E. fair. 


4 


Thu 


5 


7 


14 


17 15 


4 14 


10 10 


74 


80 


S. E. fair. rain. 


5 


Frid 


5 1 


6 69 


13 58 


16 59 


4 50 


11 10 


78 


74 


S. cloudy, rain. 


6 


Sat 


5 2 


6 58 


13 56 


16 43 


sets. 


ev. 8 


72 


74 


W. fair. 


7 


s 


5 3 


6 57 


13 54 


16 25 


7 9 


1 3 


72 


78 


N. fair. 


8 


Mon 


5 4 


6 56 


13 52 


16 9 


8 4 


1 56 


74 


78 


S. E. fair, cloudy. 


9 


Tue 


5 5 


6 55 


13 50 


15 51 


8 38 


2 47 


76 


82 


S. cloudy. 


in 


Wed 


5 6 


6 54 13 48 


15 34 


9 9 


3 38 


78 


78 


S. E. cloudy, rain. 


11 


Tim 


5 7 


6 53 13 46 


15 16 


9 39 


4 31 


78 


78 


S. W. cloudy. 


12 


Frid 


5 11 


6 49 


13 42 


14 58 


10 8 


5 24 


72 


74 


W. cloudy. 


13 


Sat 


5 12 


6 49 


13 38 


14 40 


10 45 


6 19 


72 


74 


S. cloudy. 


14 


s 


5 13 


6 47 


13 36 


14 22 


11 17 


7 13 


72 


78 


Calm, cloudy, fair. 


15 


Mon 


5 13 


6 47 


13 34 


14 3 


morn 


8 8 


72 


74 


E. cloudy, fair. 


lfi 


Tue 


514 


6 46 


13 32 


13 44 


1 5 


9 1 


72 


74 


E. fair. 


17 


Wed 


5 15 


6 45 


13 30 


13 25 


2 3 


9 50 


70 


74 


1 . fair. 


18 


Thu 


5 17 


6 43 


13 26 


13 6 


3 1 


10 38 


68 


76 


S . E. fair. 


19 


Frid 


5 18 


6 42 


13 24 


12 47 


3 57 


11 21 


71) 


80 


S. E. fair. 


20 


Sat 


5 19 


6 4J 


13 22 


12 27 


rises. 


morn 


74 


80 


S. E. fair, cloudy. 


•21 


s 


5 20 


6 40 


13 20 


12 7 


6 22 


3 


76 


80 


S.E.fair. rain. gust. 


22 


Mon 


5 21 


6 39 


13 18 


1147 


6 58 


44 


76 


75 


N. cloudy, fair. 


23 


Tue 


5 22 


6 38 


13 16 


11 27 


7 37 


1 23 


7(1 


72 


N. E. fair. 


24 


Wed 


5 24 


6 36 


13 12 


11 6 


8 5 


2 3 


70 


72 


N. E. hazy. fair. 


25 


Thu 


5 25 


6 35 


13 10 


10 46 


8 47 


2 45 


lis 


72 


S. E. hazy. 


2i ; 


Frid 


5 26 


6 34 


13 8 


10 25 


9 27 


3 28 


68 


68 


S. E. rainy day. 


27 


Sat 


5 27 


6 33 


13 6 


10 4 


10 7 


4 14 


68 


72 


S. E. cloudy. 


28 


s 


5 28 


6 32 


13 4 


9 43 


10 57 


5 4 


72 


76 


N. rain, fai 


29 


Mon 


5 29 


6 31 


13 2 


9 42 


11 32 


5 58 


74 


78 


S. E. hazy, cloudy. 


30 


Tue 


5 31 


6 29 


12 58 


9 


morn 


6 55 


78 


86 


S. E. cloudy, fair. 


31 


Wed 


532 


6.28 


12 56 


8 39 


2 13 


7 54 


78 


80 


W. fair. 



Directions J"nr the Cultivation and Management of Flowers— -for August. 
Examine the Myrtles, Oranges, Lemons, Oleanders, &c, and see if the young 
shoots are pushing out, and cut oft' all but those necessary to form the tree. 
Those which were headed down should have but about six shoots left. Gerani- 
ums require a complete dressing. Cut off the wood of this year to within a few 
eyes of that of last. Plants from cuttings should be cut to a few inches above 
the pot. Calla, Cyclamen, Lachenalia, Oxalis, Ornithogalum, &c, require re- 
potting. The seed of the Reseda odorata, or Mignonette, should be sown about 
the end of this month in pots of light earth; they should be sprinkled frequently 
with water. Cape bulbs, as Sparaxis, Ixia, &c, should now be planted. Plants 
which are growing freely should have larger pots. In turning out the ball of 
earth keep it entire, so that the roots may not be disturbed. The cool nights 
commence towards the end of the month, when great care should be taken ofthe 
tender plants The ladies should cultivate the Cyclamen for its beauty. 



CASH ACCOUNT 



21 



MEMORANDA, &c. FOB IlUGUST, 1843. 



1g fry^ T£ yC 






K El EIVED 



PHASES OF THE MOON. 




on Thursday. 



day. 

4lh 
11th 
19th 
27th 



lir. inin. 

5 11 A. 

10 54 M. 

] 29 A. 

10 1 M. 



Apogee 18th. 



■S K FTE M li K It, 1.S41. 
Winds, Weather, etc. 
at 6 A.M. and (I P.M. 

W. t'aiiT . 
82 5. JV. cloudy, fair. 
84 S. E. hifV. 
84 W. cloudy. 
80 iN. W. fair. 
80 1 S. E. fair. 
76 S. E. fair, cloudy. 
76 B. fair. 

75 5. E. fair. 

76 S.B. fair. 
75 1 E. cloudy. 

S. E. cloudy. 

<2|N. E. cloudy, fail. 

J N. E. fair. 
„ 7fjlE. fair. 
65| 6 8 S.E. hazy, cloudy. 
" °0 N. E. rainy day. 

%N. fair. 

b 6 ; E. fair. 

6 8|s.W. cloudy, fair. 

68 ! E. cloudy, fair. 

68: E. cloudy. 

72 S. E. rain, cloudy. 

72! S. E. cloudv. 

68 jW. fair. 

88 1 S. W. fair. 
E. fair. 

72 S. W. cloudy. 

70 S. W. cloudy, fair. 
N. W. fair. 



d Management of F Imves—for September. 
The plantssbould be overhauled this month, and all the remainini insects de- 
stroyed. The Geraniums repotted in August must not be too much watered, nor 
at all until the soil is becoming dry. The herbaceous plants and those of a succu- 
lent nature must be sparingly supplied. Remove the best Crysanthemums from 
the garden into eight inch pots, and they will flower beautifully m December. 
Some Cape and Holland bulbs require repotting, as Babianca, Gladiolus, Ixia, Lili- 
um, Oxalis, Tritonia, Watsonia. Try to let the Geraniums grow short and bushy. 
Thin out the Mignonettes and Oleanders, &c, and do not let the young shoots 
be crowded. Stocks and wall flowers should be lifted before the end of the 
month, and planted in seven inch pot<, with light loamy soil. Keep them in the 
shade, and sprinkle them frequently with water. Bulbs require but little water 
till they begin to grow. Hyacinths, Tulips, Narcissas, Iris, Crocus should be 
planted in soil of four eighths loam, two eighths leaf mould, one eighth decom- 
posed manure, one eighth sand, well mixed, the pots to be from live to seven indies. 



CASH ACCOUNT. 



4:j 



MEMORANDA, &c. FOR SKl'T'K. 1843. 



24 184-2. OCTOBER,10th Month, begins on Saturday. 




j^Mpfe 


PHASES OF THE Mi mix. 




'■'■'' . ■ ' 


Moon's I'll ises. day. hr. min. 






New .Moon, . . . 4th 1 19 M. 






First Quarter, . . llth 1 36 M. 




^f-iiQ r f ' '■£ : ''-~^'' : ^ 


Full Moon. . . . 19th 6 8 M. 




- - -^ 


Last Quarter, . . 26th 7 38 A. 




Moon, Per. 3d. Apo. 15th. Per. 31st. 




D 

M 


Dims 

of the 
Week. 


Rises and 

Sets. 


of 

days. 


dec. 
south. 


Moon 
R.&S. 


Moon 
south. 


OCTOBER, 1841. 




Tern. 
6 & '. 


Winds, Weather, etc. 




No 

! ! 


Name. 
Sat 


1, In 1, ,,] 


1 1 40 


3 12 


h. m. 
2 52 


h. in 

9 24 


at t> A. M. and it P. M. 
N. W. fair. 




610 


5 50 


56 


54 




2 


s 


611 


5 49 


1138 


3 35 


4 2 


10 17 


52 


52 


N. E. fair. rain. 




3 


Mon 


6 12 


5 48 


11 36 


3 59 


5 4 


11 10 


48 


46 


X. W. rainy day. 




4 


Tue 


6 14 


5 46 


11 32 


4 22 


sets. 


ev. 4 


44 


50 


IV. W. fair. 




I 


Wed 


6 15 


5 45 


11 30 


4 45 


5 47 


1 


44 


52 


IV. W. cloudy, fan - . 




1 


Tim 


6 16 


5 44 


1128 


5 8 


6 19 


1 56 


4* 


50 


N. W. fair. 




~i 


Frid 


6 18 


5 42 


1124 


5 31 


6 55 


2 55 


46 


56 


S. E. fair, rainy. 




8 


Sat 


6 19 


5 41 


1122 


5 54 


7 33 


3 53 


54 


56 


W. rain, cloudy. 




9 


s 


6 21 


5 39 


11 18 


6 17 


8 30 


4 49 


54 


r,<\ 


W. fair. 




10 


Mon 


6 22 


5 38 


11 16 


6 39 


9 27 


5 42 


5(1 


58 


W. fair. 




11 


Tue 


6 23 


5 37 


11 14 


7 2 


10 27 


6 31 


Till 


60 


S.W. fair, cloudy. 




12 


Wed 


i; 2i 


5 36 


11 12 


7 24 


11 29 


7 18 


till 


62 


W. rain, cloudy. 




13 


Tim 


H 25 


5 35 


1110 


7 47 


morn 


8 


56 


56 


N. fair, cloudy. 




14 


Frid 


6 26 


5 34 


11 8 


8 9 


1 33 


8 41 


50 


54 


W. fair. 




15 


Sat 


6 27 


5 33 


11 6 


832 


2 40 


9 21 


47 


56 


S. W. hazy. clou. 




16 


s 


6 28 




11 4 


8 54 


3 45 


10 1 


56 


51 


W. rain, cloudy. 




17 


Mon 


:5 29 


5 31 


11 2 


9 16 


4 50 


10 42 


44 


48 


N. W. fair. 




18 


Tue 


8 30 


5 30 


11 


9 38 


5 55 


11 25 


40 


48 


N. fair. 




19 


Wed 


6 33 


5 27 


10 56 


10 


rises. 


morn 


40 


46 


S. hazy. rain. 




20 


Thu 


6 34 


5 26 


10 52 


10 21 


5 30 


10 


46 


50 


W. cloudy, fair. 




21 


Frid 


6 35 


5 25 


10 50 


10 43 


6 19 


58 


46 


50 


N. W. fair. 




22 


Sat 


6 36 


5 24 


10 48 


11 4 


7 14 


1 49 


46 


48 


N. W. fair. 




23 


S 


6 37 


5 23 


10 46 


1125 


8 10 


2 42 


46 


511 


W. cloudy, fair. 




24 


Mon 


6 38 


5 22 


10 44 


1147 


9 6 


3 38 


16 


46 


N. W. fair. 




25 


Tue 


6 40 


5 20 


10 40 


12 7 


10 14 


4 34 


10 


42 


N. W. fair. 




26 


Wed 


6 41 


5 19 


10 38 


12 28 


11 19 


5 29 


31 


4 1 


S- W. fair. 




27 


Tim 


6 42 


5 18 


10 38 


12 48 


morn 


6 23 


42 


48 


S. W. hazy. fair. 




28 


Frid 


i i:s 


5 17 


10 34 


13 9 


1 17 


7 15 


43 


48 


N. E. fair, cloudy. 




29 


Sat 


6 45 


5 15 


10 30 


13 29 


2 32 


8 5 


48 


:>:> 


S. E. cloudy. 




30 


s 


6 46 


5 14 


10 28 


13 49 


3 37 


8 56 


54 


r,t\ 


S. E. clou, foggy. 




31 


Mon 


6 47 


5 13 


10 26 


14 8 


4 42 


9 48 


54 


56 


Calm, cloudy. 




Directions for the Cu'tiration /mil Management of Flowers— for October. 




Oranges, Myrtles, Lemons, Oleanders, Limes, &c., should be taken in the 




house. The Limes must be kept in the warmest part of the room. Water now 




in the morning. Lagerstremia, Sterculea, Hydrangea, Pomegranate, and other 




plants, may be placed in a dry cellar; give them air, and water them once or 




twice during the winter. Anemones, Daphne, Primula, Poeonia montan, <fec, 




should be repotted: they must not be exposed to the sun while in flower. Ca- 
mellias should now be examined and selections made. They are now in a state 






to be transported hundreds of miles without injury, if packed in close boxes. 




Camellia seed must be sown as soon as ripe; cover them one inch underground. 




Bulbous roots intended to flower in glasses should be placed in them this month, 




in a cool room. After the fibres begin to push a few shoots, remove them to 
warmer apartments. Hyacinths and other Dutch bulbs, with Cape bulbs, be- 






ginning to srow, should be put in pots forthwith. 





CASH ACCOUNT 



MEMORANDA, &c7~KOK OCTOBER, 1845 



I'M II. 



RKCF.IVKI) 



26 1842. NOVEMBER, 11th Monthjbegins on Tuesday. 




PHASES OK THE MOON. 
Moon's Plmsc-s. day- lir. inin. 
!Vew Moon, ... 2d 11 3 M 
First Quarter, . . 9th 8 10 A 
Fall Moon, .... 17th 10 25 A 
Last Quarter, . . 25th 3 55 M 


Moon, Apogee 12. Perigee 27. 



D. 


Days! SUN 


LV. 


Sim s 


of the Rises and 


of 


dec. 




Week. Sets. 


days. 


south. 


\,, 


Name. h. in. 


ii. m. 


h. m. 


° i 


1 


Tue 


6 48 


5 12 


10 24 


14 28 


2 


Wed 


6 49 


5 11 


1022 


14 46 


3 


Thu 


6 50 


5 10 


1 20 


15 5 


4 


Frid 


6 51 


5 9 


10 18 


15 24 


5 


Sat 


6 53 


5 7 


10 11 15 42 


6 


R 


6 54 


5 6 


10 12! 16 


7 


Mon 


6 55 


5 5 


I0 10ll6 18 


8 


Tue 


6 56 


5 4 


10 8 16 36 


9 


Wed 


6 56 


5 4 


10 8 16 53 


10 


Tim 


6 57 


5 3 


10 6 ( 17 10 


11 


Frid 


6 58 


5 2 


10 4 17 27 


12 


Sat 


6.7.1 


5 1 


10 2 17 43 


13 


R 


7 1 


4 59 


9 58 18 


14 


Mon 


7 2 


4 58 


9 58 18 15 


15 


Tue 


7 3 


A 57 


9 54118 31 


16 


Wed 


7 4 


4 56 


9 52 18 46 


17 


Thu 


7 5 


4 55 


9 50 19 1 


is 


Frid 


7 6 


4 54 


9 48 19 16 


19 


Sat 


7 7 


4 53 


9 46 19 29 


20 


R 


7 8 


4 52 


9 44 19 43 


21 


Mon 


7 9 


4 51 


9 42 19 56 


22 


Tue 


7 9 


4 51 


9 40 20 9 


23 


Wed 


7 10 


4 50 


9 40 20 22 


24 


Thu 


7 11 


4 49 


9 3820 34 


■r» 


Frid 


7 11 


4 49 


9 38 20 47 


26 


Sat 


7 12 


4 48 


9 36 20 58 


27 


R 


7 12 


4 48 


9 36 21 9 


2S 


Mon 


7 13 


4 47 


9 34 21 20 


29 


Tue 


7 14 


4 46 


9 32|21 30 


30 


Wed 


7 15 


1 15 


9 30 


2140 



Moo; 

ll.&i 

h. ii 
5 43 
sets. 

5 40 

6 18 

7 7 

7 57 

8 57 

10 2 

11 5 
morn 

1 20 

2 30 

3 43 

4 54 

5 55 

6 55 
rises. 

6 28 

7 16 

8 11 

9 6 

10 12 

11 17 
morn 

16 

1 23 

2 31 

3 37 

4 43 

5 47 



10 42 

11 3 
ev.3' 

1 36 

2 35 

3 31 

4 23 

5 11 

5 57 

6 38 

7 18 

7 58 

8 39 

9 21 
10 5 

10 53 

11 53 
morn 

37 

1 33 

2 30 

3 26 

4 19 

5 11 

6 1 

6 50 

7 39 

8 30 

9 24 
10 20 



NOVEM PER, 1841. 

Tern. 
o&9. 



Winds, Weather, etc- 



at 6 A. M. and 9 P.M. 



S. E. cloudy, fair. 
Calm. rain. fair. 
Calm. fair. clou. 
N. W. cloudy. 
W. fair, cloudy. 
N. W. fair. 
W. fair, cloudy. 
S. W. rain. clou. 
N. \Y. fair. hazy. 
N.E. cloudy, rain. 
N.E. rain, cloudy. 
S. W. rain. fair. 
N. W. fair. 
Calm. fair. 
IV. W. fair, cloudy. 
N. W. fair. 
5.W. fair, cloudy. 
Calm, cloudy, fair. 
N. E. rain. 
N. W. cloudy. 
Calm, cloudy. 
S. rain, cloudy. 
W. fair. 
Calm. fan. 
IV. E. rainy day. 

. W. cloudy. 
IV. W. cloudy, fair. 
Calm. fair. snow. 
N. snow. fair. 
W air. 



Directions/or t.'ie Cultivation and Management of Flowers—for November. 

The plants are not now in active vegetation, and they should be frequently 
ailed, but watered sparingly. Look over them three or four times a week. Suc- 
culents need a little water about once in three or four weeks. Supply Amaryllis 
that are dormant moderately. Dry the tender bulbs properly, and place them in 
a box of very dry sand or moss. They can be potted the first of April. Place 
the autumn (lowering Cape bulbs near the glass, and out of the shade of other 
plants. The Oxalis n ay be made to bloom this mouth; it must be kept in the 
sun, that it may expand freely. Camellias will flower from this until April. 
Pure air and proper watering are what the plants now require. Be careful to 
turn the Geraniums and other growing plants, that they may have an equal share 
of light on all sides. Keep the shutters closed at night, and admit the air in 
small portions during the day. Be mindful of sudden changes of weather, and 
keep the temperature of the room at about 50 degrees. Dutch bulbs should not 
be kept longer out of the glasses. Remove all the decayed leaves. 



^ * S~>- iu. ^-<t^*"*j yL_ i— 



CAS II ACCOUNT, 



27 



MKMilKASin.Ar. I'OK M>\ i.mi;i:i;. 1-IJ. 



I^^J^lZ 









- 



^__ - ._ 



-/_: £2 



,_- 







■_ 



_ 



2 te« 



PAID. 












&8 1842. DECEMBER, 12th Month, begins on Thursday. 




«sl 




PHASES OF THE MOON. 




pftji' 


Moon's Phases. day. hr. mill. 

New Moon, . . 1st 11 10 A. 




Kf-^'"' 1 ' 


First Quarter,. . 9th 5 20 A. 






Full Moon, . . . 17th 1 42 A. 
Last Quarter, . . 24th 11 41 M. 
New Moon, . . 31st 1 58 A. 




Moon, Apogee 10th. Perigee 22d. 




M. 

1). 


Days 

of the 
Week. 


SUN 
Rises and 

Sets. 


L'gth 

days- 


Sun's 

dec. 

south. 


Moon 
R.&S. 


Moon 

south. 


DEC EM HE H, 1840. 




Tern. 


Winds, Weather, etc. 




1 


Name. 

Thu 


h.m. 
7 15 


4 45 


h. m. 

9 30 


21 49 


h. m. 

sets. 


h. in. 
11 IS 


6 & ft 


at tl A. M. and !» P. M. 




:w 


35 


N. cloudy, fair. 




2 


Frid 


7 15 


4 45 


9 30 


21 58 


4 52 


ev.17 


■2', 


32 


IV. fair. hazy. 




3 


Sat 


7 16 


4 44 


9 28 


22 7 


5 54 


1 16 


29 


36 


W. fair. 




4 


s 


7 16 


4 44 


9 28 


22 15 


6 44 


2 1 


:::! 


2S 


N.E.elou. snow'd 




5 


Mon 


7 17 


4 43 


9 23 


22 23 


7 56 


3 1 


24 


24 


N.E.[2 days in suc- 




6 


Tue 


7 17 


4 43 


9 26 


22 31 


8 57 


3 49 


22 


22 


N.E.[cess'n,&.fell 




7 


Wed 


7 18 


4 42 


9 24 


22 3S 


9 57 


4 32 


23 


20 


Calm. fair.[2f'ton 




8 


Thu 


7 18 


4 42 


9 24 


22 44 


10 57 


5 14 


•20 


24 


Calm. clou, [a lev. 




9 


Frid 


7 18 


4 42 


9 24 


22 50 


11 51 


5 54 


24 


28 


Calm. f'r. [drift'd. 




10 


Sat 


7 19 


4 41 


9 22 


23 56 


morn 


6 34 


2K 


32 


Calm. clou. fan-. 




11 


s 


7 20 


4 40 


9 20 


23 1 


51 


7 15 


30 


32 


W. fair. 




12 


Mon 


7 20 


4 40 


9 20 


23 6 


1 50 


7 58 


26 


32 


W. cloudy, rain. 




13 


Tue 


7 20 


4 40 


9 20 


23 10 


2 49 


8 44 


34 


40 


W. fair. 




14 


Wed 


7 20 


4 40 


9 20 


23 14 


3 48 


9 33 


35 


38 


W. fair. 




15 


Thu 


7 21 


4 39 


9 18 


23 18 


4 49 


10 26 


32 


37 


E. fair. [rain. 




16 


Frid 


7 21 


4 39 


9 18 


23 19 


5 52 


11 23 


37 


34 


N.E. cloudy, snow 




17 


Sat 


7 22 


4 39 


9 18 


23 22 


rises. 


morn 


32 


30 


W. fair, cloudy. 




18 


s 


7 22 


4 38 


9 16 


23 24 


6 43 


20 


■>', 


22 


N. W. fair. 




19 


Mon 


7 22 


4 38 


9 16 


23 2.". 


7 45 


1 18 


19 


20 


N. W. fair. 




20 


Tue 


7 22 


4 38 


9 16 


23 26 


8 25 


2 14 


19 


21 


N. W. fair. clou. 




21 


Wed 


7 22 


4 38 


9 16 


23 27 


9 26 


3 7 


21 


26 


N. W. fair. clou. 




2-2 


Thu 


7 22 


4 38 


9 16 


23 27 


10 26 


3 58 


■2: 


30 


S. E. cloudy, fair. 




23 


Frid 


7 22 


4 38 


9 16 


23 26 


11 25 


4 48 


•21 


2c' 


N. W. fair. 




24 


Sat 


7 22 


4 38 


9 16 


23 2.", 


morn 


5 37 


h 


30 


N. W. fair. clou. 




25 


s 


7 22 


4 38 


9 16 


23 23 


1 6 


6 26 


25 


25 


Calm, cloudy. 




26 


Mon 


7 22 


4 38 


9 16 


23 21 


2 10 


7 17 


24 


■>: 


S. E. snow. clou. 




27 


Tue 


7 21 


4 39 


9 18 


23 19 


3 16 


8 12 


28 


26 


N. W. clou. fair. 




28 


Wed 


7 21 


4 39 


918 


23 15 


4 21 


9 7 


•22 


26 


N. W. fair. 




28 


Thu 


7 21 


4 39 


9 18 


23 12 


5 25 


10 5 


22 


25 


N. W. fair. 




30 


Frid 


7 20 


4 40 


9 20 


23 9 


6 28 


11 3 


25 


30 


W. cloudy. 




31 


Sat 


7 20 


4 40 


9 20 


23 8 


sets. 


11 52 


31 


34 


Calm, rainy, clou. 




Directions /'or the Ciihirotieii ami Maim cement of b'toxcers—J'or December. 




The weather in this month is so uncertain that the florist must be constantly 




on the watch. Keep the temperature as regular as possible, about the same as 




last month. Let in the air whenever it can be done without injury, especially 




about noon, in small quantities. The room should not be kept to > longshutup. 




Thirty six hours is long enough. Never allow the plants to be kept in darkness 
over one night. Withdraw the plants from the windows during nights of very 
severe frost. Do not water until the soil is becoming dry. But if there are 








Hyacinths and other Dutch bulbs growing, supply them liberally. Destroy the 
insects as soon as they appear. Clean the foliage with sponge and water fre- 
quently. Turn the plants often. Koses may be obtained by keeping them in a 








warm room that has a south window. Supply bulbs in glasses with water once 




a week. Camellias in bud and flower must not become dry. Air and wash them 




frequently. They will not flourish with a coal lire. 





CASH ACCI l UNT, 
MEMORANDA, &c. FOR DECEMBER, 1842. 







10 

PAID. IRECEIVED 










, 



_ 



/* g. y£*^s^L 



a*<_ 










er^s 




;>;> 



CASH 



COUNT 



RECAPITULATION, 



JANUARY, . 
FEBRUARY 
MARCH, 
APRIL. . 
MAY, . . 
JUNE,. . 
JULY,. . 
AUGUST, 
SEPTEMBER, 
OCTOBER,. . 
NOVEMBER, 
DECEMBER,. 



*_ 



| RECEIVED. 



TABLE, showing the value in dollars and cent?, of a pound sterl- 
* ' • iiig, at from 5 to 20 per ceiit. premium. 

Si ^)VH*POUND sterling 



4 67 
4 68 
4 70 
4 71 
4 72 
4-78 



4 76 



4 81 



''PlOi 
75 10i 



pi:igct. prem. 
is $4 82 

'-: M 

v 4 H 

4 85 

4 88 

4 87 

4 88 

4 90 



1-2 

m 

\-\ 

12| 

12 

i:u 

13| 
4 91 11 

4 9| n; 



• ; 9? 
4 94 
4 95 
4 96 



pen a. prem. 

is $4 97 



5 00 
5 01 
5 02 
5 03 
5 04 
5 05 
5 06 
5 07 
5 08 
5 09 
5 11 
5 12 



!5Jr 



1 98, 15^ •■• 

16 .. 

I64 • • 

16? . . 
16$ . . 

17 . . 
17i . . 
17.'. .. 

18 . . 
18*.. 

19 . . 
19i • . 
20" . . 



. prem, 

$5 13 
/*5 14 
. 5 15 
. 5 16 
. 5 17 
. 5 I c ' 
. 5 20 
. 5 21 
. 5 22 
. 5 24 
. 5 26 
. 5 28 
. 5 31 
. 5 33 



Biographies of Eminent Men. 

[ll'rit/ot /'■•>• iiif Business Directory. — To be a n 



:n 



WILLIAM FELL, from whom 
''Fell's Point," in the east iM part of 
the city of Baltimore, derives its name 
[lip carpenter, and member of 
H ety o( t < id in L 
He emigrated with his on 
Fell, v. ! 

rchased of Mr. Lloyd Harris the 
trai t hi' land which still bears his name, 

ami which v ('opus's 

harbor. On this I ract he erected a 
i . bouse, i hii b is till standing 
on Lancaster street. I 
Fell win shipped in a liou e » liich was 
built bj a company of Quakers near the 

which the meeting house 
ll was appropi tated to I 
pany by a Mr. Taylor— 4>eing a 
hie farm. He pur based the property 
<i of a mill. 
and the first brick hoi 

d the first which was two 
stories high, without hip roof, in the 
town. It stood on the North-western 
intersection of Calvert and Chatham 
(now Fayette) streets. In 1745 he was 
appointed i nnissioners 

for laying out Baltimore 
Town. He died in the year 1746. 

Major THOMAS 6HERIDINE took 
up Ian I in Ball imore County in the year 
I7fil. In 170:3 he was appointed one of 

the visiters of the County School, under 
an act of the Legislature which pro- 
vided for the free schools in the State. 
' I i 1732 he was appointed 

-lice, and in 1734 he pur- 
chased the Kingsbury lands at the head 
of Back river. "He was appointed Com- 
i 1745, in conjunction with 
several others, to erect the two towns 
of Baltimore ami Jones' Town into one, 
under the name of Baltimore Town. 
In the year 175i>, lie became the owner 
of Col rborand Mountenay'snect, 

east of Jones' Falls, when High street, 
from Plowman to French street, in- 
cluding about eighteen acres, was added 
to the town. He offered the lots for 
sale on both sides of High street. He 
agreed, with a number of others, to take 
up lots in Baltimore Town for the en- 
couragement of settlers, and his name 
stands at the head of a list subscribing 
nineteen pounds, the largest amount 
subscribed by any one person, for the 
erection of a market-house and town- 
hall. He was elected a member of the 
House of Delegates, and was a promi- 
nenf actor in the early settlement of the 
town of Baltimore. His death took 
plare about the year 1754, leaving a re- 
spectable amount of property in the 
town, in the prosperity of which he 
manifested so much interest. 



JOHN MOALE was the I 
gentleman of the same name who c-mi- 
i rom Devonshire, where he li\ ed 
occupation of a merchant. He 
owned considerable land, and carried 
on an extensive business near the re- 
nt' Mr. Fell. The inhabitants 
of the vicinity applied to 
on which to lay out the town of Balti- 
more, but the abundance of iron ore 
which it furnished, rendered it I 
luable to him to part with it < 

iase. This was. 
stance, as it prevented tli 

have for ever prevented its pn 
Being defeated in their first • 

red an 
Ij "for creatine a town 
on the north side of the Pat j 

re County, and for laying out 
into lots, sixty acres of land, in and 
about the place where one John Flem- 
ming now lives." This Flernm .:. . 
on some land which was the property 
of Mr. Carroll, and lived in 
which was then called a Quarter, and 
stood near the corner of Ul.li r - 
and Charles street. Mr. Moale, after the 
death of his father, became interested 
in the success of the town, and si 
a plan of it, including about twenty -five 
houses, only four of which v 
brirk. One of these, or a part I 
.-till standing at the corner of Calvert 
and Bank streets. He built in 175-1, a 
brick house on the corner of Calvert 
street and Lovely lane, and one i 
lot where the Sunday school of St. 
Peter's Church now stands. In the 

"., the Indians having, in con- 
junction with the French, defeat 
Braddock, went over the country in 
search of plunder, and came within 
about eighty miles of the town. The 
inhabitants became alarmed, and the 
women and children were placed on 
board of several boats and vessels in the 
river, to be sent down the bay for 
safety in case of p.n attack. In this ar- 
rangement Mr.Moale bore a conspicuous 
part. In 1767, he was elected a mem- 
ber of the House of Delegates, and ap- 
pointed by that body a commissioner, 
with others, to build a Court House and 
prison on the uppermost part of Calvert 
street, next Jones' Falls, which at that 
period, took its course in that vicinity. 
The Court House was built accordingly 
the spot where the Battle Monument 
now stands, and the prison on the west 
end of the same lot, near the place now 
occupied by the Masonic Hall in St. 
Paul's street. Mr. Moale, in conjunction 
with Mr. Steeger, in 1773, was appointed 
to add eighteen acres to the town. 



Xi 



B I O fi R A P H I E 



They selected the land between Gay 

and Front streets. He was appointed 
trustee for the erection of an Alms 
House on North Howard street. The 
same was, by law, to be considered a 
work -house for idlers and paupers. The 
ae partly consumed by fire in 
lTTU. in 1771, committees w< 

pointed by the se\eral counties for the 
purpose of devising tin- hes1 method to 
ii relation to the invasion of the 
Bri1 isc army, and to as ii I in 
out the measures of Congress in that 
day of trial. Mr. Moale was chosen on 
the committee for Baltimore town; his 
name was also returned from the coun- 
ty. He was appointed on the committee 
to address General Washington, who 
passed through Baltimore on the 8th of 
September, one month before his\ ictory 
at Yorktown, in company with Count 
Rochambeau, General Ham, Maj. Gen. 
Baron Vromenil, Brig. Gen. Chan-lux. 
and Gen. Clinton. The town was il- 
luminated on the occasion. He was in 
17SS, appointed one of four county 
justices to be associated with the Chief 
Justice, Samuel Chase, in the trial of 
male persons for felonies, &c. and who 
were, if guilty, to be condemned to 
work on roads leading to the town. He 
died at an advanced age on the 5th July, 
17§8. At the time of his death he was 
one of the presiding justices of the 
Couuty Court. 

THOMAS TODD was the son and 
heir of Captain Thomas Todd, a gentle- 
man who removed from Virginia to 
Maryland, and purchased land at North 
Point in 166-2. In 1734, he was ap- 
pointed commissioner for laying out a 
town of ten acres into twenty lots, 
valued at 150 pounds of tobacco each. 
It was first called Jones', then Jones' 
Town. This town, which rendered Mr. 
Todd and his brother commissioners 
famous, followed the course of Jones' 
Falls, and consisted of one street with 
three prongs. It commenced at a great 
gully, near where Pitt street now runs, 
and extended to the intersection of 
Front and French streets. He was a 
gentleman of some celebrity in his day, 
and left some property in the town he 
was interested in establishing. 

EDWARD FOTTERALL emigrat- 
ed from Ireland in 1740. He purchased 
land from the Carroll family, and built 
of imported bricks, a house in Calvert 
street. Soon after he erected the I mild - 
mg he returned to Ireland, where he 
pied. The house he had taken great 
pains to build, and which he spared no 
pains to render strong and substantial, 
was deserted after his death, and af- 



forded shelter for a number of the 
French neutrals, who fled from Acadia 
and Nova Scotia in 1756. Here they 
established their quarters, and erected 
a temporary chapel. The deserted es 
tate 01 Fotterall afforded those misera- 
ble creatures an asylum, who by their 
industry. got into the possession of a 
number of lots where South Charles 
street now stands, on which they threw 
up many cabins and huts made of mud 
and mortar. The place was, lor a long 
time, called French town; some of their 
houses are yet standing. 

WILLIAM DARBY LUX, son of 

Darbj Lux, who in the year 17:«, was 
extensively engaged in the London 
trade. He was one of the commission- 
ers for uniting Baltimore and Jones' 
towns into one, and having purchased 
lots No. 43 and -14, on the west side of 
Light street, he built a comfortable 
dwelling, and conducted a very respecta- 
ble business. -The son, and subject of 
this memoir, early identified himself 
with the interests of the new town of 
Baltimore, and became an active and 
useful citizen. He was appointed in 
1750, to superintend the erection of a 
tobacco inspection house on the west 
side of Charles street, near D/hler's 
alley. In conjunction with two other 
gentlemen, he erected houses on the 
bank, near the shore of the Patapsco. 
One of the houses was built on the east 
side, one on the west side of Light 
street, and near tho west end of Bank 
street; the other further east, near South 
street. This part of the town was en- 
closed by a fence, having "a gateway for 
carriages on the north end of Gay street, 
another at the west end of Baltimore 
street." and a third,smaller than the i est . 
for passengers on foot, near St. Paul's 
Church, on the hill at the head of 
Charles street. This fence was kept in 
repair by subscriptions paid bj the in- 
habitants. Mr. Lux was one of those 
who subscribed for the ere.-tion of a 
market-house and town-hall; his sub- 
scription was five pounds sterling. He 
was elected to the House of Delegates 
in March 1751 . He owned a sloop which 
was the only vessel, except one, owned 
by any inhabitant of the town. He was 
appointed one of the commissioners of a 
lottery in 175:!, for raisins 450 pieces of 
eight (dollars) for building a public 
wharf. In 1774, he was chosen trustee 
for building a house for the poor- He 
established a rope walk on the south 
shore, lear Lee street, which was then 
a thick forest. He was included in the 
committee of reception to meet Gen. 
Washington and his company, when 
marching to Yorktow n. 



BIOGRAPHIES 



33 



WILLIAM STUNK. This gentle- 
man succeeded Thomas fireene as Go- 
vernor of .Maryland in 1649. His prede- 
cessor, w ithoul > ' ' 

prudence, after the beheading of Charles 
the Fh ■!. proclaimed for the Prince oi 
Wales, hi I dei lared him to lie the 
rightful heir to all hie father's dominions. 
For this offence he was dis] laced, and 
Mr. Stone appointed his 
Soon after Mr. Stone's appointment, 
ilj was divided, bj 1 iw, into 
two houses, in order that the one might 
upon the other, and 
administer the <;<■• ei nmenl 
satisfaction of the people. I 

posed thai : 

i i brewing be- 
tween the puritans a id tl 
prietary's government. The puritans 

l'i-..\ idence, w Inch occuj ied the si ite 

mi which the city of Annapolis now 

stands. Th 

disaffected on a 

pies, but political ' 

vened, and placed an insurmountable 

the control of the I ird propi 
mad I 

ithouteft'ect, 

ed the dis- 

plea ■ I proprietor for ac- 

,i.. t . views of tli - pi ritans 

The in! proprietor reprimanded him 

resume his former authority by force of 

•ited a new 
count} which thej c 

I 

battle was fought 

uripolis.) in 

which several lives were lost, and the 

He was tried, and 

cot lemned to be Bh< t, but the soldiers 

h attached to 

him, that the victors were afraid to tike 

his life. He was held a long time a 

prisoner, and afterwards released, but 

ined his former standing. 



GEORGE CALVERT was bor:i at 
i; ■■;■;.]. hi:. Yorkshire, in 1562- He was 
educated at Oxford, and made Knight; 
and Clerk of the Privy Council, try 
.Tunes I. He was afterwards Secre- 
tary of .State. He joined Hie Roman 
Catholics in 1624, and resigned his 
Secretaryship. In 1635, he was raised 
age of Baltimore* He at- 
tempted to make a settlement upon the 
island of Newfoundland, but was pre 
vented by the invasions r f the French 
He afterwards received from the king a 
grant of land in North America, and ef- 



fected the establishment of a colony 
upon that part of the continent now oc- 
cupied by the State of Maryland. He 

was Justin his dealings to the Indians, as 

well as to the colonists, and obtained 

teem of all. He was a member of 

parliament, and the author of Bevera) 

1 papers. He died in London, 

in 1682. 

JOHN CARROLL was born in the 

■-taVot Mar\l md in 17:>2. He was edu- 

i St. Omers, in Flandi i 
brought up a Roman Catholic. In 1769, 
I,-, the priest, and at- 
tached himself to the order of Jesuits. 
la 1 mi. h,. travelled in company with 
Lord Stourton over Europe, and on his 
return was appointed to a professorship 
in the college at Bruges. He returned 
rica in 1775. it was his purpose 
to have returned sooner, but the order 
of the Jesuits having been suppressed 
1'ope, he thought proper to retire 

I. He was some time engaged 

avoring to conciliate the Pope, 
in order that he might alter his dei n e 
in relation to the Jesuits. Assecretarj 
to his scattered brethren, he 
labored excessively to effect their re- 
on. In 1786, he was requested to 
: my Charles Carroll ofCarrolltou, 
Benjamin Franklin, and Samuel Chase, 
on an embassy to Canada, for the pur- 
pose of obtaining the consent of the 
ince to remain 
i rringthe war between America 
and England. The Roman Catholic 
olicited the Pope to grant 
them a head in America, Mr. Carroll 
was appointed vicar general, and fixed 
his residence in Baltimore. In 17S9, he 
isen the first bishop of the United 
and after his consecration in 
England, he assumed the title of Bishop 
of Baltimore. He was liberal in his 
views, and much respected by other 
-• ts. A little before his death he was 
made Archbishop. He died December 
■ '. 1815. His remains were conveyed to 
St. Peter's, in Saratoga street, where 
re laid out in state, and the citi- 
zens permitted to view them. 

SAMUEL CHASE was born in Som- 
erset County, Maryland, April 17,1741. 
Kis father, who was a man of learning 
and a clergyman, had him educated for 
the bar at Annapolis. At the age of 
twenty he was admitted to practice, 
and in a few years arose to eminence. 
Having been elected to the colonial 
legislature, he soon distinguished him- 
self as the avowed enemy of the royal 
governor and the court party. He was 
foremost in denouncing the stamp act, 
and soon arose to the head of the party 



:m- 



OGRAPHIES 



opposed To the British government 
.Turn- 22, 17-11, he was appointed by the 
Maryland convention to represent the 
Btati in the general Congress at Phila- 
delphia. With a fearlessness which be- 
revolutionary patriot, he pro- 
claimed to the Congress that the rever- 
end Dr. Zubly. a delegate from Georgia. 
was a traitor to the cause of Am. ri« an 
liberty, and the reverend gentleman was 

1 .in consequence of it, to flee for 

hie life. He was one of the most active 

rs of the Continental Congress, 
ami among the foremost in placing his 
name upon the Declaration of American 

ndence. In 1783, he was sent to 
England by the Legislature of Maryland, 
er stock from the Bank of Eng- 
8 well as large amounts of money 
which were due to the State. He was 
made Chief Justice of the General Court 
in Maryland, and afterwards Associate 
Judge of the Circuit Court of the ('. S. 

. Washington. After an event- 
ful life, d iring which In- was engaged in 
some of the most important scenes that 
ever occurred, his demise took placeon 
the 19th June, 1811. As a patriot and 
:a he was unsurpassed by anj 
man of his day. and in the memory of 
his countrymen, he ranks as one of her 
proudest and noblest Bons. 

JOHN EAGER HOWARD was born 
in Maryland, June 4, 17.52. He was 
appointed captain of a company of the 
colonists, when they began their resist- 
ance t :> the oppressive government of 
Grer.t Britain, and in a short time after 
wards he was chosen major in one of the 
seven regiments raised in Maryland. 
In 1779, he obtained the position of 
lieutenant colonel. After the battle of 
Hobkict's hill, and death of Colonel 
Ford, he succeeded to the command of 
the- s ;cond regiment. He was one of 
tie most efficient coadjutors of General 
Greene in the South. At the battle of 
the Cowpenshe so signally distinguished 
h m-. If. that it is said he turned the for 
tunes of the day by a most desperate 
■ i with fixed bayonents, to whirl 

he led his men. He had, at one time 
in his hands, the swords of seven Britisl 
officers, who surrendered to him per 



sonally, in this celebrated battle. For 
Ins gallant conduct, he received tli 
thanks of Congress, and a silver medal. 
At the battle of Eutaw Springs, General 
Greeni directed Col. Howard to lead 
the Maryland line to the charge with 
fixed bayonets, a mode of fif 
perate as it was, for which the line had 
become famous. In his efforts to drive 
the enemy from his position , the Colonel 
was hit with only one commissioned 
officer and thirty men. Undaunted in his 
■i.i- il. he was leading this little intrepid 
ban 1 1 to another charge, when he was se- 
verely wounded. From this wound he 
never entirely recovered. He fought in 
the battles of Gerniantown.WhitePlains, 
Camden and Monmouth. After the 
war he retired to his estate, in the vicinity 
of Baltimore city. In 1788, he was 
chosen Governor of Maryland, and in 
1796, he was elected a member of the 
United States Senate. In 1 7' is. when 
Gen. Washington was placed at the head 
of the American army, in anticipation of 
a war with France, Col. Howard was 
chosen Brigadier General by him He 
was a member of the committee of vigi- 
lance, during the late war with Great 
Britain. His heroic reply to a proposi- 
tion, discussed in tin- committee of\ igi- 
lance. for the city of Baltimore to ca- 
pitulate to the enemy after the capture 
of Washington city, is worthy to be 
held in lasting remembrance by even 
American patriot With the flush of 
indignation upon his war-worn cheeks, 
lie sprang upon his feet and exclaimed, 
•1 have, I believe, as much property in 
the city as any member of the com- 
mittee, and 1 have four sons in the 
leld, but I would sooner see mj pro- 
lerty in ashes, and my sons in their 
graves, than consent to listen to any 
proposal of capitulation '" It was a re- 
mark of General Greene, "that he de- 
served a statue of gold no less than did 
the Grecian and Roman heroes." He 
lied in the year 18-27. The funeral was 
ittended by his Exi ellene\ John Quincy 
Vdams. then President of the United 
States, and by the Heads of the Depart- 
ments 'of the United States, and the 
principal citizens of Washington and 
Baltimore. 



General Events during the year 1841. 



JANUARY. 

1 . The celebrated Mandamus case 
in which Wm. B. Stokes, Lucius W. 
Stockton, and Daniel Moore were plain- 
tiffs, and Amos Kendall, Postmaster 
General of the United Stit.es, defendant. 
was in progress in the Circuit Court of 
the United States, in the Distri t of 
Cohvmb-a. The declaration claimed 



damages to the amount of one hundred 
thousand dollars. 

1. The new Patent Office at Wash- 
ington was completed, and thrown open. 

5. The Court of Common Pleas, 
(Pennsylvania.) divorced James Enni, 
Sen-, from his wife Emma Haines. The 
parties were related to each other as 
grandfather and granddaughter. The 



GENERAL EVENTS IN 1841. 



35 



decree of the Court goes to declare that 
a man cannot man 

i nd -mother. 

6. The Pe 
at Harrisbui . in ■ruber was 

in In | laci . ' !• last having arrived the 
evening before. A rare instance of 
pun. tuality. 

i). A great and sudden change oftem- 

tool pi ■' ; on the 6th and 

■ ; tin. The snow 
the Hudson, 
P ill, and other 

i . iter, in the 

i 'lie of the 
- i i unusual 
ere carried 
oil' in dine the country . 

roads rendered impassable, and a great 
royed. 
8. The Ho sofM ii'-. 

land refused to hoist the .Star S] 

on the S I House, in honorof 
the eel bi i1 ictory of 'Jen. Ji 

ew Orleans. 
10. The S i rose so 

high, and r ial the boat 

with 1'. S. Mail a id passengers from 
Phil timore, ■ :oi ! 1 not 

pass. £ i B 

ice, were de- 

20. A circul 
Elliott to thi ubjectsof 1 
England, in <' ; n , announcing that ar 
ide with the 
government of China to the following 
affect :— --J. 

and harborof Hong Kong to 
crown. A ii i id duties to 

the empire, upon fi 

to be conduct I ii W I a npoa. 2. An 

imentof 

Die at once, and the remainder in equal 
. in 1846. ?, 
Dire i offii ; i letween the 

two countries upon an equal footing. 
4, Thett di of thi portof < 
opened within a tew days after the 
Chinese new year, and to I 
atWhampoa, till further arrangements 
are practicable al the new settlement." 

•25 A shock of an earthquake was felt 
in the i it' of N sw York and vicinity, 
to such a degree as to excite considera- 
ble alarm. 

27. Alexander McLeod, of Upper 
Canada, under arrest on a charge of 
being engaged in burning the steamboat 
Caroline, at F irt Schlosser, during the 
military occupat.on of Xav\ Inland in 
L837, was admitted to bail in the amount 
of $5000. When this fact became 
known, the indignation of the people of 



Lockport was so much excit. 

■ mbled in grent numbers , and 

prev ailed on the bondsmen to w ithdraw 
the bail which they had given, BO that 

Mi Leod "• '- continued in confinement 

to await bis trial. 
30. The town of Mayaguez, Porto 
lildings, 

Was con -Mine, 1 1 

- ,000. 

February! 

5. The Pennsylvania Bank of the 
United States, after ha 
time of the gene, >i specie 

-. mi the l "'tli of January, a 
pi-nod of twentj d y -. "paid 

little, if al all, short of six mil- 
lions of dollars, a coinoi pei ie funds. 

■ ! 

produced a great excil 
followed by an exhibition of i - - 
which were so unfavorable at I 

great surprise. The suspension was 
illowed by the other banks in 

Philadelphia, the banks of Baltimore, 
,vc ; but the banks of New York and 
New Ens 
in. The ut i of [Jpp< r and Lower 

Canada tikes place. Lord Sydenham, 

Governor Genera] of British North 

th of office as 

lor of Canada, under the act for 

the union of the Upper and Lower 

. ivince. 

21. The emigrant ship called the 
Governor Fenner, bound from Liver- 
pool to Xew York, having a crew of 
.. including the captain, and 
teerage passen- 
■■ mts>. about two o'clock 
in the morning, twelve hours after sail- 
ing from Liverpool, came in collision 
with the Nottingham steamer from Dub- 
lin. It being excessively dark at the 
time, no assistance could be rendered, 
ind the Governor Fenner suddenly 
sunk A 11 on board perished except the 
captain and fir t mate. 

•22. A land slide in the commune of 
Gragnano, in Italy, occurred, by which 
one hundred persons lose their 

2-3. The town of Reggio, in Calabria, 
the southern province of Italy, was 
nearly destroyed by an earthquake. 

2"). The Bogue Forts and the city of 
Canton were captured by the English. 
The number of prisoners taken at 
Chuen-pee, was stated at 1,000. and the 
killed and wounded on the side of the 
Chinese were said to be very numerous. 
Canton was almost deserted by its in- 
habitants. 

2fi. The Irish Registration of Voters' 
Bill, at the end of a debate of four days, 
passed in the Eritish House of Commons 
bv a vote of-299 to 294. 



36 



GENERAL EVENT! 



MARCH. 

4. The inauguration ofG neral Wm. 

Henry Harrison, b - Pr< 9id< n1 of the 

United States, took place al Washing! in 

i" presen fa com oui i i>i sp< ctatot - 

i ;m itcl ::t fiom 30,000 to 
60,000. The Inaugural address was 

i i . -^ j 1. 1 1 <• 1 1 1 •< I from Wa-liniLton to New 

York, by railroad, in eleven hours. 

11. Tin' Kllgll-ll St> ■..in ;-:i, 1.,-t I'. 

from New York for Liver- 
pool, hm ing a crew oi eighl ■. 
and twenty-eight passengers; in all 109 

-on,'-. \..i!iiii: li..s been heard of her 
sini i . Tbi P said to have 

been the largest ■ team vessel 

■ ut $384,000; 

—insurant • ■ $288,000. 

l.'i. Tin- re. "i- iiinl -teams ofwaterin 

North Carolina, Smith Carolina,Gfeorgia, 

and Alabama, ruse to an extraordinary 

height, in consequence of great rain,". 

I'ih- rains commenced in the upper 

country, on the 9th of March, and the 

the lower country began to rise 

about the 12th or 13th, and by the loth 

or 16th, the roads in many parts were 

tinder water. Much damage was done 

'" !■' - -.1! . and to property on 

■ . also to railroads and other 

roads. Some of the rivers, as the Ogee- 

chee, Oconee, and Ockmulgee; in Ga., 

er than they 

great Yazoo freshet in 1796, 

"i- ■■ .iiiy time s-ince. 

17. President Harrison i 
clamation calling an extia ssion of 
o be convened on the31st of 
May, • > ■ onsider "sundry weighty and 
important matters, chiefly gr< wing out 
of the B1 ite ofthe revenue and finances 
of the country 1 ." 

■-'■.. Captiir. Elliot, the chief superin- 
tendent of the British commerce in 
China. sa\ s in his prui lunation, "A sus- 
iiostiiities at Canton and in 
the province, has been this day agreed 
"," ii between the imperial Commis- 
sioner Yang and the undersigned. — It 
has further been publicly proclaimed. 
under the seals of the Commissioner 
;i id the a ti ig Governor ofthe province, 
that the trade of the port of Canton is 
ope i. find ticit British and other foreign 
. who may s-ee Jit to proceed 
there for the purpose of lawful com- 
tierce, shall be dulj prote ted." 

07. A tremendous, storm occurred at 
St Louis and vicinity, lasting about fif- 
teen minutes, and completely covering 
the ground with hail. 

APRIL. 
4. Wm. Henry Harrison, President 
ofthe United States, died at the Presi- 
dents' mansion, in Washington city. 
He was the first President who died in 



office. On the 7th the funeral obsequies 
were performed, and an immense con- 
course assembled from different part" 
stimony 

of respect to the inemorj of the de- 
There were pall-bearers in the 
procession representing all the states 
i the Onion. 

.">. Nearly one-quart to! the town of 
Antigua, in the island of Antigua, 'A I : 

Indies, v. ;i- .!.. in,.., I hvlire. Loss es- 

12. i ' .1 -now storm in 

l'enn-.v Ivania and New York, &c. The 
-now fell to the depth of a foot in New 
York city. 

12. The residence of the late Presi- 
dent Harrison, at North Bend, was par- 

• by fire. The conflagra- 
tion originated In aci ident. 

13. vice President, now President 
Tyler, issued hi on to the 
p.'..;de of the L'nited 5 I t.-, that a day 
ofhumi - i. should 

' dry, in 
t.l.i 1, of ■ ibii.i-c ion to the stroke of 
Divine Providence, which deprived the 
nation of its Chief Magist ate. He ap- 
point, d the 14th ofMay for the purpose. 

19. The ship William Brown, of Phil- 
. on her passage from Europe, 
was lost at sea under the most distress- 
ing circumstances. Of a crew of seven- 
teen, and sixty three passengers, eleven 
only were saved. The crew threw a 
number overboard after they had suc- 
eeded in getting on board the boats. 

23. A treaty" between the United 
States and Portugal, which was con- 
cluded Augii t 26, 1840, was ratified. 

MAY. 

4. The post office in New Market, 
New Hampshire, was burnt. Tetters, 
papers, post office accounts, &c. all lost. 
A number of other buildings also de- 
stroyed. 

11. The crew of the bark Recovery 
were examined in New York, relative 
to a wreck -ecu by them, which they 
supposed to be the steamship President. 
Nothing satisfactory could be elicited. 
The captain was much censured for 
not boarding the * 

14. The day was universally observed 
throughout the Union, as a day of fast- 
ing and prayer, in accordance with the 
recommendation of President Tyler. 
Business was suspended, and all the 
churches open for religious services. 

16. A Constitution was decreed by 
fie Legislature of Yucatan, and pub- 
lished at Menda, the Capitol. The state 
lie'-l.ued its independence of the Repub- 
lic of Mexico. 

17. Ajlarsre portion of the rock, (about 
2.i0 feet ofthe cliff,) on which the de- 



GENERAL E 

Fences of the i tl of Q lebec ia built, 

Ball away, causing the ruin of severa" 

! buildings, and the death o 

21. Tin ■ foreign trade of Canton was 

sii-i]n-iiili-ii. ami lm-1 

I,.' CI !..i I I,. II 

principal batteries for the di (i 

Canton, were - ' i i .j . r. - --. -• 1 on the 34th ; 

the Bri1 took pos 

session of thi hi glil in 1 he rear or the 

city, after a severe action, on the 25th ; 

; th, a capitulation took 

the Chinese ag 

i.OOO ransom 

for thi i1 the Chinese 

troops, except those of the province, 

should i" w ithdrawn within sb daj s, 

lossi e partial de- 

struction "i ), should be 

paid. The ."00 was ac- 

tually paid as stipulated. 
24. Mr. Fox, the Minister Plenipo- 
. writes 

to Mr. Webet - / of S 

the U. S. ; out of which grew a lengthy 

and important correspondence. 

38. Lgreatflooi 

- 

liah is said ],. I 

a century, (oats passed through all 

■ it the citj of \ ugusta. Many 

wooden houses were carried off, the 

'•(hers undermined 
or injured i orses, &c, 

off, and much other damage 
was di 

39. The New York National Theatre 
was burnt bj incendiaries. Cost of the 
theatn- ai^ 

of Congress 

the< 

".a the first ballot. 

JUNE. 
4. The resolution moved by Sir Ho- 
bert Peel. "That Her MajestJ 'e minis 

ters do not sullicicntK |»i-.-si tic- i mi 
fidence of the House of Commons, to 
ena I igh the House 

to the public welfare," 
passed the House of Commons by a 

vote Of 312 I 

8. The President and Directors of 
the ]\, Bank of the United 

States, entered a suit in the District 
i ' olas Biddle, late pre 

sident of the institution, for a large 
amount. 

15. The town of Praia, in the island 
of Ten.,, i. was completely destroyed 
by an earthquake. .Much d 

d to othei places in the islanfbya 

Beries of earthquakes. 



N 1841 . 



37 



l'i. The Bteam-packel Columbia ar- 
m ed at i; 

Liverpool of twelve days and eight 
hours, being the shorn si 

irs, el made- from England to 
the Unite,' - 

18. 'J ; tution of the 

ibliclj sworn to, and 
d President. 

22. Thi i. 

• he Queen, disaoh - 
ing the parliament and call 

published in 
the Royal G 

the tJn - hington 

_ o'clock, P. M. 
the Bixtieth yes r of 1 
26. The remain 

with appropi 
to be depot I 
North Bend, < )hio. 

the Fiscal Bank of the United States, 
passed in the Senate by a vote of 26 to 23. 

JULY. 
6. The bill to distribi 
of the sales of the public lands among 
the several St i1 pre-emp- 

- 
House of Repre entativea bv a vote of 
HGto 108. 

12. The opinion of the Supreme 
Court of the State of New- York, in the 
case of Alexander McLeod, v 
livered atUtica, by Mr. Justice Cowen. 
The Court denied the application for 

risoner, and or- 
1 be be remanded to ta 
trial according to the ordinary forms of 

13. '. - -ttlementofthe 
i the East between the Sultan 

of Turkey and the Pacha of Egypt, was 
it London by the representatives 
of Austria, France, GrSat Britain. Prus- 
and Russia. 1. The heriditary po* 
infirmed to Me- 
hemet Ali and his descendants, in a 
direct line. 2. Mehemet Ali will he al- 
lowed to nominate his own officer- up 
to the rank of a colonel. The Viceroj 
can confer the title of Pacha only with 
the consent of the Sultan. .3- The an- 
nua] contribution ia fixed at 80,000 
-100,000 
pounds. 4. The Viceroj will not be al- 
lowed to buil la ship of war without the 
permission of the Sultan. 5. The laws 
dations of the empire are to be 
■ I in Egypt, with such - 
as the peculiarity of the Egyptian peo- 



38 



GENERAL EVENTS IN 1841. 



i n , 1m! winch 
I lie sanction of 
the Porte. 

13. Si >ok place 

at To lIo Fi in i onsequence 

of win. i refect, 03 the 

I 

bill for effecting an uniform 

i ■', , was passed in 

it was after- 

.iiiil in tin' House. 

28. 1 1.. I tion I'm- the 

Advancement of Science met at Ply 

on till the 

4tli of A i 

AUGUST. 

6. The hill for the establishmnet of 

I 

o. The Sub-Treasury, or I 

Treasury law, which was passed ley the 

House of R< -|.n •seutaiives of the 26th 

is, JuneSO, 1840, by avoteof 124 

Hi i! d.\ the House of the 

27th Conj ote ofl34 to 87. 

;). The steamboat Erie, having sailed 
from Buffalo for Chicago, a little after 
lock, P. M., with upwards of 
■ ird, consisting of thirty 
cabin passengers, about 1411 
: :i rs. mostly Swiss and 
German emigrants, and the crew, when 
about thirty-three miles from Buffalo, 
at about eight o'clock, took fire by means 
of a vessel tilled with varnish, and was 
totally destroyed, together with all on 
board, except twenty-eight, who were 
p eked up Kv the steamboat De Witt 
Clinton three or four hours afterwards. 
The loss ol property u is great. The 
boat was esluii:t.-d at «7o,000 ; mer- 
chandise $-20,000; specie belonging to 
emigants $180,000 

12. The boiler of the steamboat Sarah 
Bladen, on the Mississippi, fifteen miles 
above Bayou Sara, buret, and several 
lives were lost. 

16. President Tyler returned the bill 
passed by both Houses of Congress, to 
establish a Fiscal Bank of the United 
States, with his veto. 

18. A bill for the establishment of a 
uniform system of bankruptcy through- 
out the United States, to go into opera- 
tion February 1, 1342, reconsidtred and 
passed in the House of Representees, 
by a vote of 111 to 106. 

10. The British Parliament met, and 
the Rt. Hon. Charles Shaw Lefevre was 
re-elected Speaker without opposition, 

20. A fire broke out in the evening 
at Syracuse, New York, in a carpenter's 
and joiner's shop, in which twenty-seven 



or twenty-eight k-g.- ..('gunpowder, (640 
■ I. The explo- 
the powder was tremendous, 
Hi of twenty-live or more 
-_ many others. 
Tli- sound was heard from i ■ 
thirty nnh ■ - ili- 1 int. The coroner's jury 
9tated, "That in the belief o( the jury, 
; ■ i set on lire by some per- 
son or persons to the jurors unknown, 
and the powder was secretly stored in 
the shop, contrary to the ordinances of 
i niise." 
33. The bill for the distribution of 
■ public 
il states, in pro- 
portion to population, passed the United 
States Senate, in concurrence with 
ae of Representatives, by a vote 

28. An amendment to an address to 
the Queen of Great Britain, censuring 
certain measures of the government, 
and expressing a want of confidence in 

the ministry, passed the House of Com- 
mons by a majority of ninety-one. The 
same amendment was passed in the 
House of Lords, on the 24th, by a ma- 
jority of seventy-two. On the 30th, 
Lord Melbourne gave notice in the 
House of Lords, that lie and his col- 
leagues had tendered the resignation of 
their offices, which had been accepted. 
A new ministry was soon after formed, 
Sir Robert Peel being first Lord of the 
Treasury. 

SEPTEMBER. 

3. A bill for establishing a "Fiscal 
Corporation of the United States," 
passed the Senate, in concurrence with 
the House of Representatives, by a vote 
of27to22. 

4. The city of Cincinnati was, for 
twenty-four hours, in a state of com- 
plete anarchy, controlled mostly by a 
lawless and vindictive mob, trampling 
all law and authority under foot. The 
number of persons engaged in the riots 
was stated at from 200 to 1,500, com- 
posed of Irishmen, persons employed 
on the river, and other disorderly peo- 
ple. Their violence was directed chiefly 
against the negroes and abolitionists. 
Several were killed, and twenty or thirty 
wounded. 

9. The bill passed by both Houses of 
Congress, for establishing a " Fiscal Cor- 
poration of the United States," was re- 
turned to the House of Representatives 
by President Tyler, with his objections. 
The veto power has been exercised 
fourteen times, since the adoption ofthe 
Constitution, by several Presidents, as 
follows: 

By Washington, in 1792 and in 1797. 
By Madison, twice in 1811, once in 1812, 



(; E 



R A I, E V E S T S 



L 8 4 1 . 



39 



D 1822. Bj 
Xaekson, twice in L83I, twice in 1832, 
1834. Bj T 

10. Thorn I 

I 

i. Attorney 

retaim-d l>\ In- -■ or, I 

Tyl i. b< .nations, to take 

the 12th. 
13. Th 171 ' 
having held an • ; om the 

31st of H 

which were, an ai t authorij 
nf 913,000,000 ; an act repe 

or Independent I 
ry ; an act to establish a uniform system 
of bankruptcy throughout the United 
act to appropriate the pro- 
ceeds of thi iblic lands, 
and to grant pre-emption rights; and an 
act making appropriations for various 
fortifications, for ordnance, and for pre- 
venting and lian hostili- 
ties. An ac1 establishing a "Fiscal 
Bank," and anoth< r 
cal Corporation," were pas 

th of which 
received the veto of the President 

OCTOBER, 

4. A great storm occurred on the 
I, of rain, snow and wind. 
H 

harbors to 
property . At Pig 
Rockport, Mass., out of sixteen fishing 
vessels fomteen were destroyed. Tlie 
snow fell in some places to the depth of 
a foot. 

7. A severe gale occurred in the 
eastern States, Much damage was done 
to the shipping, and upon the land. 
Several lives were lost. 

8. A grave-digger was brought before 
the Procureur General of Algiers, 



charged with feeding his pigs upon the 
bodies of the persons he had barfed. 
A great quantity of jewelry was found 
In his house, which had been taken from 
the bodies. The Procureur General or- 
dered all his piga to be killed, and inter- 
dicted the use of pork for some time. 

IB. The jury by which Alexander 
McLeod was tried, after an absence of 
thirty minutes, returned into court with 
a verdict of not t •■■ 

13. A grand temperance procession 
took place in New York citv. Many 
thousands participated in it — among 
whom were several apprentices from 
the Navy School, in full uniform. 



1^. 

\ ed the 

prominent busin town. 

19. Queen \ i 

child v. 

tower thundi red forth the proclamation, 

and th. as alive 

21. B 

-idence, 
is in the 
OS were 
I burial 
around. 
21. A destructive fire occurred in 
I ■ 
■ 

i from yellow 
. 

r of London was burned, 
nail ar- 
morj . v 

• ed. It was supposed 
tire was caused by an incen- 
diary. 

NOVEMBER. 

4. The north wing of the Peniten- 

med by 

nre. Ir orkshop by the 

convicts who learned the =hoemaking 

■ 

9. A fire occurred in Vicksburg, 

Miss., which destroyed two squares. 

Thirty houses were cons 

9, A Lond m I I that there 

making in that city, who cannot earn 
■•ntly. 
Edward 
Boling, but whose real name was Sidney 
ted of bigamy in 
X. C. He was sentenced to be branded 
with the letter B on his right cheek, to 
be imprisoned 3 years in~the peniten- 
tiary, and to r. s three 
times during the term of his imprison- 
ment. He was branded in the court. 

■22. Three men were swept over the 
Jails of Niagara ; they were engaged in 
smuggling whiskey. Their cries were 
heard from the shore, but the night was 
so dark, that no assistance could be ren- 
dered them. 

38. The steamship Savannah was 
lost in a severe gale off Cape Hatteras. 
She sunk very suddenly, allowing the 
passengers no tima for preparation. 
They barely escaped with their livts. 

! he Prince ,l e Joinville took his 
leave of the United States. He em- 
barked from New York in the frigate 
Belle Poule for France. 

29. The General Post Office was re- 
moved to the new building, erected for 
its use, in Washington city. The edi- 



40 e v 



A L T I M O It E D U R I N G T H E YEAR 1841, 



lice, which w:n built at immense cost, 

DECEMBER. 

1. The statue of Washington, exe- 
cuted In (in .'in, nuh, wa.s r.n ed to its 
cenl re of the ro- 
I the Capitol. 

s. I i,. \; .■■■,■ nf President Tyler 
' - ogress at twelve 



o'clock. H lilt Washington city seven 
minutes pa6t twelve, was in Baltimore 
■ nil past one. It reached 
Philadelphia five minutes past five, and 
New York thirteen minutes past nine. 
10. Tin- captain 

ported that the \el- 

luw li-ver v i ' place with 

great \ iolence. lei ei al \ merican Bear 
ini-n had fallen victims to the disease. 



Events in Baltimore during tlxe year 1841. 



JAM' IlRY. 
I- \ steamer belonging to the United 
States (ni\ -eminent, intended for service 
in Florida, was launched from the ship- 
Mini hi L. I'.- Cully, t of Federal 

Hill— 134 fei t long, 26 feel deep. The 

engine wa- lll.llin i:n lined l.\ Iteeder. 

2. r\V0 men were line- 

on the Sahhath. One for 
working himself; the other for keeping 
other- employed. 

3. The Franklin Bank determined to 
wind up its concerns. Gnat excite- 
ment prevail) d throughout thecity,ahd 
the run commenced against several 
other banks. 

5. John Smith was arrested for steal- 
ing shoes and other articles. 

6. A circumstance was brought to 
light of the narrow escape of a wliols 
family from being poisoned on Christ- 
mas day. A fine pudding was turned 
out upon a large dish, when the lady of 
the house discovered something pecu- 
liar in its appearance; on questioning 
the cook, she ascertained that she had 
used corosive sublimate in its prepara- 
tion, instead of sakrratus. 

8. The water in Jones' Falls, rose 
above the bridges, and overflowed into 
the streets. The steamboat Relief was 
forced through the ice, near the draw- 
bridge, and further damage prevented 
by giving vent to the water, which was 
prevented from passing by the quan- 
tities of ice which had collected at the 
mouth of the Falls. 

8. An attempt was made by the pri- 
soners to break jail. It was frustrated 
by the timely interference of the keep- 
ers. 

12. A run was made on some of the 
shinplaster institutions of the city, but 
without effect. 

18. The schooner Elizabeth, of Phi- 
ladelphia, ran into the schooner Fair 
Leader, in the river, and the latter sunk 
in five minutes. The captain and crew 
were landed, and walked to the city. 

22. The presidents of the banks in 
the city held a meeting, and resolved to 
resume specie payments on the first of 
February. 



L 1 ."). The gable end of a house in Cal- 
vert street, which some workmen were 
engaged in removing, fell upon a youth 
about twelve \ears old, by the name of 
Roach, and killed him. .Several other 
persons wen- injun d, among whom was 
a little girl, who was standing so close to 
the wall, that the lulling mass went en- 
tirely over her head, a single brick strik- 
ing her. 

28. The body of a child was found in 
a cigar box, at the lower end of Fleet 
street. It had live fingers and a thumb 
on each hand. 

29. Dr. Baxley operated 

upon a man twenty-eight years of age, 
for the cure of strabismus. The patient 
had been cross-eyed from his birth. 
The eye-ball assumed its proper posi- 
tion immediately after the muscle was 
cut. 

FEBRUARY. 

1. The banks resumed specie pay- 
ments ; matters were quietly conduct- 
ed, and no great amount of silver drawn 
out. 

•2. The stockholders of the Franklin 
Bank had a meeting, and the appoint- 
ment of an examining committee re- 
solved on. It was further resolved, 
that the affairs of the bank should be 
settled as soon as possible. 

■ '.. William Sheppard, temporary con- 
ductor of the Frederick train on the 
Baltimore and Ohio Rail Road, fell 
from the foot-board, on which he was 
passing around the car, with a lantern 
in his hand, and the succeeding car 
passed over his head and arm, killing 
him instantly. 

5. One hundred and twenty-one vo- 
lumes of valuable books were present- 
ed to the Female Orphan Asylum in 
Mulberry' street. The Apprentices' Li- 
brary also received a handsome donation 
of books. 

8. The President-elect, Gen. Wm. 
H. Harrison, addressed the citizens 
from the portico of Barnum's City 
Hotel. 

8. An inquest was held over the body 
of Jacob Cornish, a colored man, who 



EVENTS IN BALTIMO] 



DURING THE YEAR 1841. 4:1 



immediately upon landing from a vessel, 
fell upon tin- wharf and expired. 

8. The students at St. Mar} V College 
rebelled against the government of the 
institution, in consequence of the eject- 
ment of one of the lads who, on 

In J of a white woman m the si I 

the institution, to take > pitcher oi water 
to his room, broke the pit' her over her 
head. The other students tool 
at the dismissal of their associate, and 
while at tea rose from their seats, and 
smashed every <li > h on the table. Kit 
teen of the rebellionists were di 
and order re.-tored. 

9. The banks suspended specie pay- 
ment-, tin- -iri.nil time, after paying the 
same eight days. 

:>. Samuej Harden, a respectable citi 
zen, and member of the se< ond br tni b 
of the city council, died suddenly. 

10. The "goods, chattels, lands, tene- 
ments," together with all the scenery, 
of the Front street theatre, was sold at 
public auction. 

15. The Patapsco river was frozen 
over, for the second time during the 
season, as far down as can he seen from 
the telegraph station. 

16. I'rofessor Baxley operated, with 
entire success, in a case of strabismus. 

22. The steamboat Ben Sherrard, 
was launched at the ship yard of L. B. 
Culley. 

23. The grand jury found a bill of 
presentment again-t James I,. Hawkins, 
tor ab trai ting $100,683 78, the proper- 
ty of the Franklin Bank. 

27. Eight of the prisoners at the jail 
effected their escape through the sewer 
leading into Jones' Falls, but were im- 
mediately recaptured, and locked up in 
their rooms. 

MARCH. 

6. Fifteen of the prisoners attempted 
to break out of the jail. They made for 
the sewer, which empties into Jones' 
Falls, but were intercepted by Mr. Dis- 
ney, the keeper. The prisoners, finding 
they were foiled in their attempt, re- 
treated to their ward, and barricading 
the door, they bid defiance to the officers 
that came to arrest them, declaring that 
they were determined to effect their 
purpose, and would kill any one who 
should dare to interrupt them. To pre- 
vent the entrance of the officers of the 
police, for whom the warden had sent, 
they threw boiling water, and such mis- 
siles as they could procure, through the 
gratings. The tumult of insurrection 
soon spread into the adjoining wards, 
and the whole establishment was 
in an uproar. Before the insurgents 
were quelled, it became necessary to lire 



upon them, and one of their number, 
named William McCoy, was killed. 
15. The inhabitants of the vicinity of 

the Spring Gardens, were thrown into the 
I commotion, by the discovery of 
what was termed a cart load of dead 
bodies, in the water. They proved to 
be the refuse of a dis-ei ting room. 

24. Two respectable looking women, 
Sarah Kunsman and Eliza Ann Chris- 
topher, were arretted for stealing lace 
from the store of J. G. Smith, in Charles 
Street. The lace was found by the police 

officers, concealed in a bed in Mrs. Knns- 
man'a house, on Federal Hill. Some 
jewelry, and other valuables, were found 
i oni ealed in the same place. The 
women were committed to jail. 

28. A Mr. Brown hired a cartman to 
do a job for twenty-five cents, but being 
diappointed in the operation, the cart- 
man agreed to take twelve-and-a-half 
cents for his trouble. Brown refused 
payment, was warranted, tried before 
the magistrate — cast — imprisoned — and 
finally petitioned out, and saved his levy. 

APRIL. 

4. The bells ofthe city were tolled, and 
flags hoisted half-mast and in mourning, 
upon the public-houses and shipping, in 
honor of Gen. William H. Harrison, 
President of the United States, who 
died at half-past twelve in the morning, 
at his residence in Washington city. 

4. A fire broke out on the corner of 
Market alley and Lexington St., about 
2 o'clock in the morning, and a Mrs. 
Frederick, and her two children, were 
rescued from death by Thomas Griffith, a 
member of the New Market fire com- 
pany, who rushed through the flames to 
their rescue. 

5. The Washington Temperance So- 
ciety celebrated its anniversary by a 
procession, in which all the Temperance 
Societies in the city participated, with 
appropriate banners and badges. The 
procession was one of the largest and 
most interesting that ever passed thro' 
the city. A prayer was oft'ered, and 
speeches delivered in Mount Vernon 
place. The day passed of!" very pleas- 
antly. 

7. A colored man died at the corner 
of Cove and Saratoga streets, while eat- 
ing his supper. He was the fourth hus- 
band of his wife, and the other three 
had died in a similar manner, — the first 
in bed — the second immediately after 
supper — the third whde eating his din- 
ner. 

11. Bernard McGraw was killed by the 
passage of a train of cars, on the Balti- 
more and Philadelphia rail road, over 
his body. He was not discovered until 



4:3 EVENT! 



BALTIMORE DURING THE YEAR 1841. 



wenty minutes after the train had 
passed. He was yet alive, but died in a 
short time. Both legs were entirely cut 
off from his body. 

19. John Smith was arrested and 
bound over, for beating the son of a Mr. 
Henderson. 

26. The funeral procession, in honor 
of Gen. William H. Harrison, late presi- 
dent of the United States, took place. 
The procession was very long, consist- 
ing or all the associations in the city, 
military and civil, and religious. The 
whole city was hung in mourning, and 
presented one continued scene of gloom 
and sorrow. At Mount Vernon place, 
near the base of Washington monument, 
the exercises of the day were conducted. 
They consisted of music, a prayer by 
Dr. Johns, of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, an oration by Jonathan Mere- 
dith, Esq., and the singing of a hymn 
composed for the occasion. 

27. A fire broke out in a frame house 
in Fayette street, near Pearl, which 
consumed the building so rapidly, that 
the inmates were obliged to fly for their 
lives, with whatever clothes they hap- 
pened to have on them. A child of 
about seven years of age, crept from the 
garret window, and clung by the spout, 
with her body entirely suspended below, 
until a ladder was procured, and James 
Piper ascended and released her from 
her perilous situation. She grasped the 
spout so firmly, that he had difficulty in 
breaking her hold. 

MAY. 

4. The friends of a very respectable 
young man were thrown into the utmost 
consternation by his sudden disappear- 
ance, on the eve of his marriage with 
an amiable and interesting young lady. 
The time appointed for the marriage ar- 
rived, and all things were in readiness, 
with the clergyman at hand, but the 
groom, from some cause unknown, was 
absent. He had been heard to say that 
he would lay violent hands upon him- 
self, and it was feared that he had put 
his threat in execution. 

4. Messrs. Share & Sons exhibited a 
splendid new engine, built by them for 
a company in New Orleans, 

5. The gentleman who so unceremo- 
niously left his intended bride on the 
evening appointed for the celebration of 
their marriage, returned to his lodgings. 
He had wandered off in a fit of abstrac- 
tion, but refused to give an account of 
himself. 

6. A man was arrested who hart run 
away from his creditors in Washington 
city. Finding the police men were on 
the scent, he took to his heels, and led 
them a considerable chase over several 



of the principal streets in the city. He 
was beset by the boys, with the cries of 
"fire," "murder," "stop thief," &c. and 
was finally captured under the counter 
of a boot-maker in Gay street. He had 
run from the Globe Inn, in Baltimore, 
above Howard street. 

8. The ship Stephen Lurman, was 
launched from the ship-yard of Mr. 
Duncan. She was a fine vessel, and 
moved in beautiful style into the water. 

14. The day was kept in accordance 
with the recommendation of President 
Tyler, as a day of fasting, humiliation, 
and prayer. Business was suspended, 
and the inhabitants generally, attended 
places of public worship. 

17. The body of a boy was found in 
the basin. He appeared to have been in 
the water several days. His pockets 
were filled with stones. 

17. An election was held for mem- 
bers of Congress. It passed oft' with 
the greatest order and quietness. The 
democratic candidates obtained a small 
majority in the city, which was over- 
balanced in Anne Arundel county, and 
the whigs were elected. 

19. A man by the name of McChes- 
ney, was shot with a pistol by another 
named Clifford, at a store in Columbia 
street. McChesney came in for liquor, 
which Clifford refused to give him. An 
altercation ensued, in which C. shot his 
antagonist in the face. 

25. The Front street theatre was 
struck by lightning, and injured to a 
small extent. The fluid was attracted 
by the cupola, and passsed down the 
building, shattering some of the windows 
in its passage. 

27. The Protestant Episcopal con- 
vention commenced its session in St. 
Paul's church. Bishop Whittingham 
read his charge to the clergy, in which 
he stated his design of establishing a col- 
lege in the State, on the property of 
the late General Samuel Ringold, in 
Washington county. 

JUNE. 

3. The Maryland State Colonization 
Convention assembled in Light street 
meeting house. Members were present 
from all parts of the State. 

5. Francis Walker was killed by 
Andrew Freeberger, in Light street. A 
slight quarrel, while they were partly 
intoxicated, induced them to agree upon 
a fight, which proved fatal to Walker. 

8. The corner-stone of a new meet- 
ing house, to be erected for the German 
Evangelical congregation, wa3 laid at 
the corner of Eutaw and Camden sts. 
Addresses were delivered in German 
and English, by the ministers in attend- 
ance. 



LTIMORE DURING THE YEAR 1841. 4:3 



12. An attempt was made by three of I Bigham came out of the tavern to re - 
the convicts to escape from the Mary- quest them to desist ; they turned upon 
land penitentiary. They had succeeded him, and others who interfered, with 



in making a hole through the wall ofth 
hospital department, when they were 
discovered by the nurse of the depart 
ment. 

15. John Smith was bound over to 
keep the peace with George H. Hanson 
and others, for the space of six months 

18. The Apprentices' Library was 
opened, for the purpose of loaning books 
to the apprentices and youth of the 
city. The number of volumes procured 
for the institution is considerable, and 
the works well selected. 

21. The scaffolding of a mill, which 
was building on the Falls road, gav 
way, and precipitated Mr. Greer, the 
contractor, to the ground, amidst 
of stone and rubbish ; a large stone 
which fell with him from the scaffold, 
struck him on the head. The accident 
caused his death in about four hours. 

23. During a thunder storm, the 
daughter of Mr. Penn, in German street, 
a house in Franklin street, and another 
in Eutaw j=t., were struck by lightning. 

26. The remains of President Harri- 
son were brought to the city, under the 
direction of a special committee of the 
citizens of Cincinnati, to convey them 
to his late residence at North Bend. 
They were taken to Barnum's City 
Hotel, from which they were taken on 
Monday to the cars of the Baltimore 
and Susquehannah Rail Road. The 
military of the city kept guard around 
the hotel, while the body remained, and 
followed it in procession to the cars. 

JULY. 

3. The Maryland Cadets encamped, 
as is their annual custom, near the city, 
and received the visits of the citizens. 
They went through their military exer 
cises much to the satisfaction of their 
visiters. 

4. The anniversary of American In- 
dependence falling on Sunday, was cele- 
brated by religious services. Several 
military companies assembled in uni- 
form, and attended divine worship. 

5 The day was kept, in honor of In- 
dependence, by the postponement of 
business, and a number of civil and reli- 
gious assemblages which took place in 
different sections of the city. The Sun- 
day Schools met in a grove at Green- 
wood, and engaged in appropriate cere- 
monies. 

5. A man by the name of Bigham 
was brutally murdered by a set of row- 
dies, who were prowling the city for the 
purpose of disturbing its peace. They 
commenced beating a dog at the corner 
of Franklin and Howard streets, and (his death in a short time, 



clubs and swingletrees from the wagonB 
near them. Bigham fell, and was most 
inhumanly beaten even after the breath 
had left his body. The gang were ar- 
rested. 

5. During an excursion of the steam- 
boat Patapsco to Annapolis, a man 
named David Stapleton fell overboard 
and was drowned. 

22. Dr. Baxley operated on a young 
man for the cure of stammering. The 
operation was performed in about a 
minute, and the subject immediately 
proceeded to answer such questions, 
and pronounce such sentences as were 
required, without the least impediment 
whatever. 

25. The thermometer rose to 97 de- 
grees. The heat throughout the city 
was excessive. 

26. A man by the name of Forbes 
arose from his bed in the night, and 
went up to the roof of the house, corner 
of Bond and Baltimore streets, in search 
of a cool position, the weather being op- 
pressively warm. Missing his way, he 
stumbled and fell from a height of about 
thirty feet. One of his legs was broken, 
and he was otherwise so seriously in- 
jured, as to render his recovery very 
doubtful. 

AUGUST. 

2. The Union engine house was fired, 

and about one hundred volumes of an 

excellent library either burned or carried 

off. 

5. A murder was committed on the 
Reistertown road. Barney Gallagher 
induced his wife Barbara, to follow him 
to a hay barrack, some distance from 
their dwelling, where he beat out her 
brains with a gun. When found, her 
skull was fractured, one arm was broken, 
and her legs lacerated in a shocking 
manner. He was taken up and com- 
mitted to jail. 

6. A shinplaster institution on Fells' 
Point exploded, and it was ascertained 
that one or two scoundrels had formed 
a fictitious board of directors, and per- 
suaded an old German, who had some 
money, to become the president. The 
honor of being president of a banking 
institution pleased him awhile, but he 
soon discovered the trick, and exposed 
his deceivers. 

Mr. Henry Fulford, an aged and 
respectable citizen, was killed at Hall's 
Spring, about five miles from the city, 
on the Harford road. He was standine 
near the pump, when a horse attachea 
to a cart took fright, and run the shaft 
against his back so violently, as to cause 



44 EVENTS IN BALTIMORE DURING THE YEAR 1841. 



11. The revenue cutter "Ewing," 
was launched from the shipyard of 
Cooper & Abrahams. 

12. Two boys wore engaged in strip- 
ping tobacco at a warehouse in Centre 
Market space, when one rose up t > re- 
venge himself for an insult offered by 
the other, and thrust the blade of a knife 
three inches into his abdomen. The 
wound was dressed bya physician. 

20. A house in Alice Anna street 
was struck by lightning. The fluid 
passed through a ro im in which Mrs. 
Roach and her twu daughters, occu- 
pants of the hou3e, were" sitting, and 
shattered the lid of a box near one of the 
ladies, without doing injur> to either of 
them. 

20. Three houses in Run alley, were 
thrown down during the thunder storm 
which occurred. They fell with a tre 
mendous crash. Part of a house ir 
Chatsworth street, and another in Co 
lumbia street, near Cove, were also 
thrown down. 

SEPTEMBER. 

1. A lad seventeen 3-ears of age, the 
son of a respectable widow lady real 
ding on Pennsylvania avenue, arrived 
in the city, and reported to the police, 
that he was seized while in the prosecu- 
tion of his business down the bay, and 
carried on board of a schooner, where 
he was detained as a prisoner. He was 
attended, in the hold of the vessel, se 
veral days by the captain and others 
who threatened to drown him if he did 
not be quiet. Two others were on 
board the boat, who had been captured 
in the same way. Having the opport 
nity of escape, the three leaped into a 
jolly boat, and rowed for the si 
After travelling 205 miles on foot, they 
succeeded in reaching the city. 

12. The surviving defenders of the 
city, when it was threatened by the 
British, in the late war, formed a vene 
rable and interesting procession, and 
passed through the principal streets of 
the city. 

12. The fourth attempt to burn the 
Howard engine house, was rendered ef- 
fectual by the dexterous effort of the in 
cendiary. The building, and part of 
the aparatus, were consumed. 

14. Two gentlemen were nearly 
crushed to death by the Philadelph 
train of cars, as it passed through the 
gate at the depot. They were standing 
in conversation, when they were caught 
between the car and the stone pillar at 
the side of the gate. 

23. Eight of the prisoners at the Bal 
timore jail, attempted to effect their es 
cape. They labored incessantly for 
some time, to make a hole through the 



all, and when they had nearly effected 
their purpose they were discovered, and 
put in more rigid confinement. 

The New Market fire company 
presented the Apprentices' Library with 
everal hundred vols of valuable books. 

OCTOBER. 
3. A schooner, in attempting to cross 
the bow of the steamboat Georgia, was 
run down, and somewhat injured. The 
accident occurred near Fort McHenry. 
An election was held for Governor 
and members of the Legislature. The 
< 1 i \ pissed off quietly. The democratic 
ticket succeeded by a very large majo- 
rity. 

0. Three boys were killed by the 
falling in of a sand bank, on the Bel-Air 
load. They were playing in the sand, 
when the part above them gave way, 
burying them entirely. When they 
were taken out, they exhibited signs of 
life, but died in a few minutes. They 
were the sons of Mr. Grimes, Mr. 
Flemming, and Mr. Bokee. 

19. Jefferson Griffith was tried for 
the murder of Bigham on the 5th of 
July. Verdict of the jury, guilty of 
murder in the second degree. 

21. The President of the United 
States passed through the city, on his 
way to his family residence, near Wil- 
liamsburg, Va. He went by the way of 
Norfolk. 

NOVEMBER. 

4. The Church of the Ascension, on 
west Lexington street, was consecrated 
for the public worship of Almighty God, 
by the Rt. Rev. Bishop Whittingham, 
of the Protestant Episcopal Church. 

6. A beautiful brig called the Nor- 
thumberland, was launched from the 
ship-yard of Samuel Butler, on the City 
Block. The vessel looked stately upon 
the stocks, and moved into the water 
amid the cheers of the bystanders. 

7. The church of St. Vincent de 
Paul was consecrated to the service of 
the Most High. The Rt. Rev. Bishop 
Chance, assisted by the Archbishop, 
performed the ceremonies. 

12. John Smith was brought before 
Justice Jones, for refusing to pay for a 
coat which, he sau\,piiic/ied him. 

13. Barney Gallagher was tried for 
the murder of his wife, and convicted 
of murder in the second degree. He 
was sentenced to the penitentiary for 
seventeen years and six months. 

18. The Firemen of the city marched 
in procession through the principal 
streets. They made a magnificent dis- 
play of aparatus, banners, and badges. 
The aparatus of nearly all the compa- 
nies, were tastefully decorated with 



FIR] 



N BALTIMORE DURING THE YEAR 1841. 45 



flowers. They proceeded to Monument 
square, where a prayer was ofl'ered to 
the Throne of Grace by Rev. Dr. Hen 
shaw, and an address delivered by John 
Nelson, Esq. 

DECEMBER. 

4. The Northern lights made their 
appearance, exhibiting a scene of beauty 
seldom teen. The radiations of lighl 
were very brilliant, and there was a In 
minous arch, which spread quite aero a 
the heavens. 

5. A bull which broke from a slaught 
er house in the eastern part of the city, 
was chased through manj of the streets, 
and finally killed near the Baltimore 
street bridge. 

5. The schooner De Kalb, loaded 
with wheat, was capsized in the river. 
She filled with water, and sunk imme- 
diately. The new were saved. 

9, William Lorman, Esq. one of the 
wealthiest and most respectable mer- 
chants, died in his 77th year. 

12. A man by the name of Griffin, 
aged about forty-two years, during the 
night, which waa very dark, fell over a 
precipice in Mulberry street, and was 
killed. He was found in the morning 



with bis l ice buried in the sand. There 
were slight contusions on the head and 
face, produced by the fall. 

13. The convention which had been 
engaged for several weeks, in endeavor- 
ing to equalize the currency of the city, 
after recommending the Mayor to con- 
vene the City Council, adjourned sine 
die. 

14. A barrel of varnish burst near 
the stove, in the druggist store of G. 
Ober & Co., N. Charles street. It took 
fire immediately, and a man who was 

lding it, was severely burnt 

15. An inquest was held over the 
body of a young woman by the name of 
Watkins, who died suddenly, at the 
house of her step-father on Long Dock. 
The stomach was removed by two phy- 
sicians in attendance, and when examin- 
ed by a celebrated chemist, a quantity 
of arsenic was discovered. A young 
man of her acquaintance, was arrested 
and committed to prison, on suspicion 
of knowing something of the circum- 
stances attending her death, but there 
being no evidence against him, he was 
soon after released. Whether the arse- 

ic was taken by herself, or given by 
another could not be ascertained. 



Fires in Baltimore during the Year 1841. 



JANUARY. 
2. At about -2 o'clock, A. M. a fi 
was discovered on the premises of 
Henry Rieman, Esq. corner of Eutaw 
and Lexington .••trect~, which was speed- 
By extinguished, without creating a ge- 
neral alarm. 

8. A bed took fire and was burnt, in 
the house of William C. Glenn, Liberty, 
one door south of Lexingtan street. 

9. Dushane's carpenter shop, Greene, 
between German and Lombard streets, 
took lire. — Little damage. 

16. The bindery of Fielding Lucas, 
jr. in the rear of his book store, was 
discovered on fire at 7 o'clock, A. M. 
which was soon extinguished by the 
Patapsco company. — More damage by 
water than by the fire. 

24. At half-past 3 o'clock, A. M. a 
fire broke out in a frame tenement, used 
as a stable and store-house, on N. Eu- 
taw street, in the rear of Messrs Brig- 
ham's warehouse, which was entirely 
consumed , together witli ten or fifteen 
barrels of molasses, belongingto Messrs. 
B righam. Ins urance in the Merchants ' 
Insurance office. 

26. A large warehouse on Howell's 
wharf, F. P., at about 9 o'clock. The 
fire was confined principally to the upper 
story and garret. Loss on house $1 ,329 : 



on stock, sails, &c. $4,000.— Insured in 
the Firemens' office for $3,000. 

28. Two wooden tenements, one oc- 
cupied by a cooper, and the other by a 
barber, on the corner of Paca and Bal- 
timore streets, were entirely destroyed. 
Insured — in the Firemens' office, $160, 
and in the Merchants', $200. 

FEBRUARY. 

3. The brass and iron foundry of 
Jos. Share &. Son, corner of Concord 
and Lombard streets, at 9 o'clock, P. M. 
The upper stories, and a large number 
of valuable patterns stored in the garret, 
were entirely destroyed, causing a loss 
of about $-20,000 — Insured in the Mer- 
chants' office for $8,000. Supposed to 
have been set on fire. 

6. Joseph Peregoy's cooper shop, 
Franklin, east of Greene street, was 
burnt at 3 o'clock, A. M. Loss $129 — 
insured in Firemens' office. 

8. A stable and office belonging to 
F. G. Waters, N. E. corner of Centre 
and Howard streets, together with two 
valuable horses, were destroyed at half- 
past 2 o'clock, A. M. Loss $500— in- 
sured in Merchants' Insurance office. 

At 10 o'clock, P. M. the engine house 
of the Howard lire company, in North 
Paca street, was discovered to be on 



4:6 KIRES IN BALTIMORE DURING THE Y E A R 1841. 



fire. The flames were fortunately ar- 
rested, before material daman had 
been done to the building. This is 
the third time this engine house has 
been fired within a few months. Loss 
covered by insurance in the Firemens' 
office, but made no claim. 

10. A stable occupied by Dr. F.E. B. 
Hintze, in the rear of the north side of 
Lombard street, between Market Space 
and Frederick street, was entirely de- 
stroyed atb o'clock, P. M. By the early 
attendance and judicious efforts of the 
fire companies," the flames were pre 
vented from spreading to the valuable 
buildings by which the stable was sur 
rounded. The fire was caused by in 
cendiaries. Loss $229— insured in the 
Firemens' office. 

The valuable warehouse of T. Palmer 
& Co. 10S Baltimore street, narrowly 
escaped destruction, by an early disco 
very that a stove-pipe, in one of the 
upper stories, had taken fire, and com 
municated to the chimney. 

Fire was communicated to the segar 
and tobacco store of Edwards &, Frailey, 
Holliday street, by carelessly leaving a 
heated stove at 11 o'clock at night.— 
The fire was promptly extinguished, 
doing little damage. 

11. An attempt was made to fire a 
stable, in rear of the Arcade, Lexington 
market, at half-past 9 o'clock, A. M. 

14. A brick house, on the corner of 
Douglass and Aisquith streets, took fire 
at 4 o'clock, P. M. — was immediately 
extinguished by the Independent fire 
company, without creating a general 
alarm. 

A ten-pin alley, attached to the Globe 
coffee house, on Pratt street, above 
Howard, was entirely consumed at 7 
o'clock, P. M. 

16. At 8 o'clock, P. M. a large frame 
dwelling, on West Falls avenue, occu 
pied by Mr. Duvall, was entirely de 
stroyed. The lumber yards and build 
ings in the vicinity were, for some time, 
in imminent danger, but by the great 
exertions of the different fire companies, 
were fortunately preserved from de 
struction. Loss $1,223, which was co 
vered by insurance — Merchants' office 
$1,200; Firemens', $23. 

18. The room occupied by the Tide 
Water Canal company, in the post offi 
buildings, was discovered to be on fire 
at about 9 o'clock, A. M. Through the 
timely arrival of the Mechanical com 
pany, the flames were confined to the 
room in which the fire originated. Los 
$•200 — insured in the Firemens' office. 
The carpenter shop of Jabez M. Gil! 
in Park street, north of Franklin, was 
fired at 9 o' clock, P. M.— It was disco 
vered and extinguished, without any 



alarm being given, by Mr. G. W. Webb, 
of the Mechanical company. Insured 
in the Firemens' office— loss $21. 

21. House on the corner of Pratt 

street and Market space, partially burnt. 
Loss $70 —covered by insurance in the 
Firemens' office. 

MARCH. 

2. G. S Griffith's store on Baltimore, 

above North street, took fire at 8 o'clock, 

P. M., but was speedily extinguished — 

doing little damage. 

4. The carpenter shop of I. Dean, 
on Saratoga street, west of Liberty ; also 
the adjoining buildings, on the east and 
west of the shop, were destroyed. Loss 
$900— insured in Firemens' office. 

5. The second story of the brick 
building, in Exchange Place, occupied 
by Tucker & Robinson, was discovered 
to be on lire at 8 o'clock, P.M. It was 
gotten under by the prompt arrival and 
well directed efforts of the Mechanical 
and Patapsco companies, only partially 
destroying the room in which the fire 
originated. 

8. The roof of a three story brick 
house, on McElderry's dock, near Pratt 
street, partially burnt oft'. By the very 
great activity of fire companies, aided 
by an abundant supply of water, the 
flames were prevented from spreading. 
The building was literally flooded with 
water- 

9. Four two story brick dwelling 
houses, on the corner of Spring and 
Wilk streets, were destroyed at 3 
o'clock, A. M. Loss $500, which was 
covered by insurance in the Baltimore 
Fire Insurance office. 

10. David Carson's carpenter shop, 
Lombard, near Charles street, also the 
frame dwelling on the corner of Charles 
street, and part of that on the east side 
of the shop, destroyed at 1 o'clock, A.M. 
Loss $300 — insured at the Firemens' 
office. 

14 Small stable on Greene street, 
partially burnt at 9 o'clock, P. M. 

17. At 1 o'clock, A. M the interior 
of the store occupied by Roberts & 
Reese, N. Howard street, was entirely 
destroyed. No insurance. 

19- J. Fitzpatrick's stables, on Lom- 
bard St., between Frederick street and 
Market spare, were entirely burnt out. 

22. The brig Susan Mary, at Cor- 
ner's wharf, at 7 o'clock, A. M. — in- 
terior nearly destroyed. Loss $42tj, 
which was covered at the Firemens' 
office. 

27. At 3 o'clock, A- M. the smoke- 
house of Charles F. Mayer, Esq. in the 
rear of his dwelling, on Franklin street, 
west of St. Paul's, was partially de- 
stroyed. 



N BALTIMORE DURING 



THE YEAR 1841. 4:7 



JS. The smoke and bacon house of 
o. Cassard .t Sun, corner of Hillen and 
East streets, waa nearly destroyed at 
:j o'clock, A. M. Loss $1,751— Fire- 
mens' office. 

At 5 o'clock, A. M. a frame building, 
at the lower end of Fleet street. 

30. A frame Stable and shed, OH 
Market alley, near the Lexington- mar 
ket, were destroyed at 6 0'( lock, A. M. 

APRIL. 

1. The building occupied by tbe 
Firemens' Insurance Company, coiner 

of Soutl i Second tn its, was found 

at half past 9 o'clock, A. M. I i I I 

Bre in t : "- garret, it was | 
tinguislied, without the aid of the lire 
companies. 

4. The frame buildings, on the cor- 
ner of Lexington Btreet and Market 
alley, were destroyed at '2 o'clock, A. M> 

6. Budding on the N. W. corner of 
Gay and llaltimore streets, at hall pasl 
2 o'clock, A. M. Damage trifling. 

10. A carpenter's shop, corner of 
Calvert and Franklin streets, was set 
on fire at two o'clock, A M. — was ex 
tinguislied by the Mechanical fire com 
pany. 

IS. A turner's shop, corner of East 
and Ensor Btreete. — It was promptly 
extinguished by the Independent com- 
pany. 

1.3. A carpenter's shop on Courtl.ind. 
near Franklin street, was set on lire 
and extinguished without much damage 
being done, at '.I o'clock, P. IM. 

16- The livery stables of Thomas C. 
Dunlevy, Frederick street, were de- 
stroyed at half-past live o'clock, P. M. 
All the horses wen- saved. 

21. A brick stable, on Salisbury- 
street, occupied by Dr. Jenning3, was 
slightly injured at half-past 9 o'clock 
P.M. 

25. The extensive flooring mill of 
the Messrs. White, two miles out on 
the Falls road, at 3 o'clock, A. M.- 
Several of the fire companies were 
speedily on the ground, alter the alarm 
was given, but not in time to be of es 
sential service. 

26. The dry goods store of Geo. I 
Kennard, on Baltimore, above Calvert 
street. About $500 worth of property 
was burnt. Further damage was [in- 
vented by the timely arrival of the Me 
chanical company. 

27. A frame dwelling on Fayette 
street, near Ilun alley, was destroyed 
Loss $329. 

MAY. 

3. A second hand clothing store, one 
door from the Bazaar, in Harrison st. 
Slightly damaged by fire, which was 



peedily extinguished by the Friendship 
oinpany, at 4 o'clock, A. M. 

Fowler's grocery Btore, corner of Hil- 
len and Exeter 'streets, partially de- 
I, at io o'clock, 1'. M. Loss 
$40— Merchant i' '.dice. 

i,. Barn and stable on the grounds of 
tCemel I half-past 

i o'clock, A.. M. 

9. The third story of the building oc- 
upied by the Susquehannab Canal Co. 
i bed by buckets, at 7 o'clock, 
P. M. 

11. Jenkins's tannery on the York 
o.id. Extinguished by the neighbours, 
at 9 o'clock, P. M. 

I). An obi unoccupied brick house, 
Kutaw Btreet, near the Spring Gardens, 
was set on fire at 5 o'clock, P. M. 

n,. a brick stable, at tin- head of 
Fayette Btreet, on the farm of Mr. Con- 
way ,was entirely consumed , at 1 o'cl "1. . 
A.'.M. 

The roof of the engine house of the 
Washington Hose company, was par- 
tially destroyed. Loss $110. 

20. An old building, opposite the 
Liberty engine house, at 9 o clock. 

22. 'stables at the country seat of 
Geo. Winchester Bolton, near the Bal- 
timore and Susquehannah rail road de- 
pot, at half-past n o'clock, P. M. 

20. A carpenter's shop, on Sharp, 
near Baltimore street, at 12 o'clock. 

30. At 10 o'clock, P. M. two brick 
houses, on Pierce alley, were partially- 
destroyed. 

JUNE. 

4. Two small tenements on Wagon 
alley, at 6 o'clock, A.M.; slightly injured. 

8 A large warehouse, at the foot of 
McElderry's dock, occupied by Dull & 
Beaeham,and F. Erickson,at 11 o'clock, 
P. M. The flames soon extended to 
William Barker & Son's three story 
brick mill — both buildings burnt down. 
W. B. & S's loss $1.V>00,— insured in 
the Equitable office for $12,400. Loss 
on warehouse $3,550, which was nearly 
covered by insurance in the Firemens' 
office, and in the Baltimore Fire Insur- 
ance office. 

10. Messrs. B. Deford & Co's bark 
mill, we-t of Saratoga street, together 
with a large pile of bark, entirely de- 
stroyed, at 11 o'clock, P. M. Before 
this fire was extinguished, an alarm was 
given from 

A house on Pratt street, formerly oc- 
cupied by Mrs. Maddox, as a hotel. 

11. Small stable in South High street, 
belonging to Gen. Leakin, at 9 o'clock, 
P.M. 

12. A spirit lamp burst in a house on 
Caroline street, and set fire to the win- 
dow curtains, at 11 o'clock, P. M. 



48 FIRES IN 



.TIMORE DURING THE Y E A. R 1841. 



16. A warehouse on McElderry's 
wharf, occupied by Mr. Mathews- 
speedily extinguished, doing little d: 
mage. 

'J'.). Three alarm* of fire were given 
between 6 and 10 o'clock, P. M. to wit 

—from tin- shop of J. S. Clements, 
Pitt, near Aisquith street, slightly in- 
jured — from a building near the glass 
house, which was promptly extinguish- 
ed by the Watchman lire company,— 
and from an unoccupied dwelling oi 
Mount Clare, which was entirely con 
Burned. 

JULY. 

4. Carpenter's shop, adjoining the 
Howard engine house — got under by 
the New Market company, doing little 
damage. 

11. Frame building on Light street, 
opposite the Methodist burying ground 
at 2 o'clock, A M. 

13. Frame stable, in rear of Aisquith, 
near Low street, entirely consumed at 
half past 3 o'clock, A. M. 

At 1-2 o'clock noon, the roof of Mrs. 
Crook's house, Pitt, near Front street, 
took fire, doing little damage. Mr. D. 
Debeates, a young man living opposite, 
was considerably injured by the falling 
of a ladder, on which he was ascending 
with a bucket of water. 

17. A kettle containing pitch was 
upset, at 3 o'clock, P. M. which taking 
fire, caused the destruction of several 
work sheds on Light street wharf. 

18. The confectionary store of Wil- 
liam Bridges, Baltimore, near Howard 
street, entirely consumed at '2 o'clock, 
A. M By the well directed efforts of 
the liremen, the flames were prevented 
from extending to the adjoining build- 
ings. Loss $o,47- — insured in the Fire- 
mens' and in the Merchants' offices. 

24. At 9 o'clock, P. M. the store of 
Messrs. McKim & Harris was robbed 
and set on fire ; but being early dis- 
covered it was quickly subdued, causing 
little damage. 

26. The carpenter's shop, adjoining 
the Howard engine house, in Paca 
street, was set on fite, at 2 o'clock, P.M. 
being the third time within a few weeks. 
By the commendable activity of the 
fire companies in the neighborhood, the 
incendiary's design was" frustrated on 
each occasion. 

30. A carpenter's shop in the rear of 
Poppleton, near Hollins street, was set 
on fire and completely destroyed, toge- 
ther with a large quantity of finished 
work, and several adjoining sheds, at 1 
o'clock, A. M. 

AUGUST. 

2. Two alarms were given, at half- 
past 9 and half-past 10 o'clock, P. M. 



caused by the reprehensible practice of 
burning shavings in the htreets. 

3. The Union lire company's house 
was set on fire at 1 o'clock, A. M. — 
which being early discovered by that 
company, was immediate!) extinguished. 

9. Mr. King's blacksmith shop, rear 
of Mr. Browning's carpenter shop, Com- 
merce street, was entirely consumed, 
at 8 o'clock, P. M. 

18. John Needles cabinet shop, on 
Uhler's alley, at half-past 9 o'clock, 
P. M. — very slightly injured. 

21. Brick bake-house, rear Of Little 
Paca street, destroyed at 11 o'clock, 
P. M. 

27. At 1 o'clock, A. M. the bar-room 
on N. G.ay street, near the bridge, was 
found to be on fire. The prompt arrival 
of the Mechanical company prevented 
•m.v erious damage. Loss $109 — Fire- 
mens' office. 

SEPTEMBER. 

3. The roof of the dwelling of James 
Hooper, Esq. Charles, near Barre St., 
was partially destroyed. 

12. The engine house of the Howard 
fire company, was entirely consumed, 
at 3 o'clock, A. M. Loss $1,260— Fire- 
mens office. 

16. A tenement on Federal Hill, 
( Light street extended,) was destroyed, 
at 11 o'clock, P.M. 

20. An unsuccessful attempt was 
made, at 10 o'clock, A, M. to set fire to 
a carpenter's shop, in Carpenter's alley. 

21. A stable in the rear of Hanover 
near German streets. 

OCTOBER. 

1. A house on the S. E. corner of 
Sharp and Perry streets, partially. 

4- A cabinet maker's shop, corner of 
Eutaw and Mulberry streets, partially 
destroyed, at 11 o'clock, A. M. 

5- Mr. Roloson's bacon store, Bal- 
timore, near Greene street, partially 
destroyed, causing a loss of $141. 

6. Mr. Bennet'Shirely's frame dwel- 
ling, on Pennyslvania avenue, destroy- 
ed. Loss $431— Merchants' office. 

9. Three small tenements on Har- 
ford avenue, at 2 o'clock, A. M. In- 
sured in the Firemens' office. — Loss 
$470. 

A small house, rear of S. Charles 
street, near McElderry's lumber yard, 
at 12 o'clock, noon. Loss $20 — Fire- 
mens' office. 

17 Peter Kernan's extensive bakery 
establishment, on McElderry's wharf, 
was entirely consumed at half-past 4 
o'clock, A. M. — Roofs of two adjoining 
warehouses much injured. Insured in 
the Firemens' office for $5294. 



CENSUS OF MARYLAND. 



49 



17. G. S. Addison's house on Greene 
street, partially destroyed, at 1 1 o'clock, 
P M. Loss $-2"> — Firemens' office. 

18. The lumber yard of William P. 
Mills, partially destroyed, at half-past 8 
o'clock, P M. 

23 An alarm was given from the 
chemical oil store of Mr. Greenougb.on 
Baltimore, near South street, at half 
past 1 o'clock, P. M. — little or no da- 
mage. 

The upper part of a two story brick 
tenement, on Henrietta street, Federal 
Hill, was set on lire and 'I 
, P. M. 

35. The roof of Captain Graham': 
bouse, Saratoga, near Charles street, 
at 11 o'clock, A M. 

28. A frame dwelling, on Howard 
s. of Pratt street, partially destroyed.— 

A colored woman was much burnt. 



NOVEMBER. 

I. Mr. Robert Russell's stable, cor 
ner of Wilk and Canal street 

ed, at 4 o'clock, A. M. together witl 
fifteen valuable cows. Insured for 
$575 in the Firemens' office. 

II. The upper part of Mi. E. He 
itt's currier simp, Market space, near 
Lombard street, at 1 o'clock, A. M. 

IS Greet cooper shop, Soutl 
street, partially. 

17. A stable belonging to R. C 
Mason, Wilk, near Exeter street, toge 
ther with two horses, at 12 o'clock, mid 
night. 

:S0. The turner shop of Josepl 
Thomas, Clay, near Howard street, par 
lially. 



DECEMBER. 

1. Mr. Hugh Cunningham's stable, 

German, near Howard street, partially, 

, 1". M. 

J. Tin 1 glass house, south side of the 

basin, slightly damaged. 

i,. From a "Report of Fires," made 

by W. W. Brown, Esq. Librarian of 

the Mechanical Library Association, we 

re, from 7th December 

i.i. I- date— 

25S 

Of which were false, or 

cause unknown, - - - - 84 
Proceeding frjm chimn 

— 120 
Fires in brick buildings 
" " frame " 
" " sundry items, 



39 



Incendiaries, 


- 40 


Chimney, - • 

St >ve Pipes, 

Negligence, - 
6- A brick 


- 1 

- 2 

- 4 

hous 



■133 
— 258 
Of which, as far as known, there were 
caused by 

Fire works, - - - 1 
Spirit Lamps, - 4 
Spont's comb'n, 1 
Unk'wn causes, S5 
; occupied by Mrs. 
Smith, on Wolfe alley, was broken 
open and set on fire— its occupants hav- 
ing first been driven into the street. 

9. The watch box, located near the 
house of the Vigilant tire company, was 
partially destroyed, at 11 o'clock, P. M. 
The watchman being awake at the time, 
fortunately escaped without injury. 

11. During the performance at the 
Museum, the curtain took fire, but was 
extinguished, without creating a ge- 
neral alarm. 



Census of Maryland. 

We have examined several statements of the Census for 1340, but can find no 
vo that agree. The following ha-: | . . ., -'.. ; ,, ;. ,: the be: t sources within 
ur reach, and is believed to be correct. The population of Montgomery county 
i given according to the last census: 



COUNTIES. 


1830. 


1840. 


COUNTIES. 


1S30. 


1840. 


Alleghany, - 


10,602 


1?,690 


Kent, - 


10,342 


Anne Arundel, 


23,29: 


29,532 


Montgomery, 


19,816 


15,464 


Baltimore, 


40,251 


.' 


Prince Georsre's, - 


20,373 


19,539 


Baltimore City, - 


80,626 


102,313 


Queene Anne's, - 


L4;396 


12,633 


Calvert, - 


8,«>9 


9,229 


Somerset, 


20,155 


19,508 


Caroline, 


9,070 


7,806 


St. Mary's, - 


13,455 


13,224 


Carroll, - 




1 7 ,23* 


Talbot, - 


12,947 


12,090 


Cecil, - 


15,432 


17,232 


Wellington, - 


. 


28,850 


Charles, - 


17,1,1',., 


16,023 


Worcester, - 


18,271 


13,377 


Dorchester, - 


18,685 


18,843 












Frederick, 


45,793 


36,405 


Total, - - - - 


446,913 


470,026 


Harford, 


16,315 


17,120 









THE POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES 

In 1790 was 3,729,326 I In 1820 was 9,638,166 

" 1800 " 5,309,753 " 1830 " 12,856,407 

" 1810 " 7,239,903 " 1840 " 17,069,463 



50 



Boundaries of Wards in Baltimore. 



[By substituting this mark TT for the words thence on the, and the omission of 
Others that are superfluous, a saving is made in giving the boundaries of the 
Wards ofabout^ce hundred war s.} 



Flit ST. Beginning at the water, foot 
of Market Bt, F P, TTE side of said st to 
Fleet st, TTN side of Fleet to Bond St, 
TTE side of Bond to Fast Baltimore st. 
TTS side of East Baltimore >t to the E 
line of the city, thence S with said line 
to the water of the harbor, and thence 
W t<> the plate of beginning. 

SECOND. Beginning at the water, 
foot of Market st, F P, TIW side of said 
st to Fleet st, TTS side of Fleet to Bond 
st, TTW side of Bond to Ea9t Baltimore 
St, ITS side of East Baltimore to Canal 
st, *TE side of Canal st to the City Dock, 
and thence east to the place of begin- 
ning. 

THIRD. Beginning at the NE cor- 
ner of Canal and East Baltimore sts, V 
E side of Canal to Pitt st, TTN side of 
Pitt to Aisquith st, TTE side of Pitt st to 
Harford turnpike road, thence E to the 
N line of the city, thence on the N and 
E boundary lines to the N side of East 
Baltimore st,and thence to the place of 
beginning. 

FOURTH. Beginning at the SE cor 
ner of Pitt st and Jones' Falls, ITS side 
of Pitt to Canal st, TIW side of Canal st 
to the water of the City Dock, thence 
W to Jones' Falls, and TTE side of said 
Falls to the place of beginning. 

FIFTH. Beginning at the NE cor- 
ner at Pitt st and Jones' Falls, TTE side 
Of said Falls to Hillen st, TTS side of 
Hillen to Monument st, TTS side of Mo- 
nument to Aisquith st, TTVVside of Ais- 
quith to Pitt st, and TTN side of Pitt st 
to the place of beginning. 

SIXTH. Beginning at the NE corner 
of Hillen stand' Jones' Falls, TTE sideof 
said Falls to the N line of the city, TTN 
line of the city to Harford road, TTW 
side of said road and Aisquith st to Mo- 
nument st, thence to Hillen st, and TTN 
side of Hillen st to the place of begin- 
ning. 

SEVENTH. Beginning at the SW 
corner of Belvidere Bridge and Jones' 
Falls, TTW side of said Falls to the 
mouth thereof, TTW side of the Basin to 
South Gay st, TTE side of said st to East 
Baltimore st, TTN side of said stto North 
st, and TTE side of North st to the place 
of beginning. 

EIGHTH. Beginning at the NW 
corner of Belvidere Bridge and Jones' 
Falls, TTW side of North to Baltimore 
st, TTS side of Baltimore to South Gay 
st, TTW side of said st to the water of the 
harbor, thence W to the SW corner of 
Bowly's wharf, thence N to Pratt st, 
TTN side of Pratt to Hanover st, TTS side 
of Hanover to Baltimore st, TTN side of 
Baltimore to Liberty st, TTE side of Li- 



berty to Saratoga st, thence W to Col- 
lege a!., thence to Mulberry st, thence E 
to Cathedral st,TTE side of Cathedral st 
to the N city line, TTsaid line to Jones' 
Falls, and TTW side of said Falls to the 
place of beginning. 

NINTH. Beginning at the SE cor- 
ner of Hanover and Pratt sts, TTE side 
of Hanover to Ostend st, TTS side of Os- 
tend st to the N side of the middle 
branch of the Patapsco, TT shores of the 
middle, main, and north west branch of 
the Patapsco to Light st, HE side of 
Light to Pratt street, and thence on the 
south side of Pratt st to the place of be- 
ginning. 

TENTH. Beginning at the S W cor- 
ner of Hanover and Pratt sts, HW side 
ol'Hanoverstto Ostend st,HN sideofOs- 
tend st to middle branch of the Pataps- 
co, UN shore of said river to the mouth 
Chatsworth run, thence to Cove 6t, 
thence S to South Paca st, thence to 
Pratt steet, and thence on the south side 
of Pratt street to the place of begin- 
ning. 

ELEVENTH. Beginning at the N 
W corner of Howard and Pratt st<3, 1JW 
side of Hanover to Baltimore st,TTS side 
of Baltimore to Liberty st, TT W side of 
Liberty to Saratoga st, thence W to Col- 
lege alley, thence N to Mulberry st, TT 
S side of Mulberry to Greene st,TT E 
side of Greene to Fayette st, HW side 
of Fayette to Paca st, TIE side of Paca 
to Pratt st, and TTN side of Pratt st to 
the place of beginning. 

TWELFTH. Beginning at the SW 
corner of Paca and Fayette sts, TJW 
side of Paca to Cove st,TTE sideof Cove 
st to Chatsworth run, TTW side of Chats- 
worth to the middle branch of the Pa- 
tapsco, TTshores of said river to Gwinn's 
Falls, thence to the W line of the city, 
thence to Fayette st, and TJS side of 
Fayette street to the place of begin- 
ning. 

THIRTEENTH. Beginning at the 
N W corner of Greene and Fayette sts, 
TTW side of Greene st to Pennsylvania 
avenue, UW side of Pennsylvania ave- 
nue to the N line of the city, TIN and W 
lines of the city to Fayette st, and TIN 
side of Fayette st to the place of begin- 
ning. 

FOURTEENTH. Beginning at the 
N W corner of Mulberry and Cathedral 
sts, TTW side of Mulberry to Greene st, 
HE side of Greene st to Pennsylvania 
avenue, TIE side of Pennsylvania ave- | 
nue to the N line of the city, thence E 
along said line to Cathedral st, and TIW 
sideof Cathedral stto the place of begin- 
ning. 



Rates of Storage. 51 

ESTABLISHED BY THE BALTIMORE BOARD OF TRADE. 



Alum, tierces of 12$ 
Brandy, hhgs. of 25 
Bristles, " 25 

BottleSj&c.hps.oflO 
Butter, kegs of 3 
Candles, boxes of 2 
Cheese, barrels of 6 
" boxes of 2 
Coffee, hhgs. of 20 

" barrels of 3 

« tierces of 12.i 

" bags of 2 
Cocoa, bags of 2 
Cotton, bales of 12$ 
Cordage, per ton 30 
Copperas, hhgs. of 20 
Codfish, « 20 
Currants, kegs of 3 
Dyewoods, pr. ton 30 
Earthenware, cts. 20 
Fish, bbls. of 6 

" boxes of 3 
Figs, drums of 2 
Flaxseed, tcs. of 12^ 
Flour & other Dry 

Articles, bbls. of 3 
Gin, hhgs. of 25 

" cases of 3 

Ginger, bags of 2 
Grain, per bushel, | 
Hempen Yarn, bis. 

of about 300 lbs. 12i 



60 



Hemp, per ton 
Hides, dried" '*i 

India, Piece, and 

Smaller Goods, 

bales of 12| 

[ndigo,in Seroons, 

per L00 lbs. 4 

[ndigo^Bengal and 

other Easl India, 

cases of I "-' 

Lion, per ton, 20 

Lard, per keg, 3 

Lemons, per box, 3 
Lead, white, kegs 

of 28 lbs. 1 

Lead, per ton, 20 
Leather, per side l.J 
Molasses, per hhg. 25 
Molasses, per tee. 18} 
Nails, per keg, 3 
Nankeens, per Die. 3 
Oil, per hhg. 25 

" per tierce, 18J 
" per bbl. 
« per box, 
" per case, 
Oranges, per box, 
Paper, Wrapping, 

per ream, 
Pepper, per bag, 
Pimento, per bag, 
Porter, per tierce, 12 
The proprietors of Goods to be at the expense of putting them in 
Store, stowing them away, and delivering them. 

All Goods Stored, to be subject to one month's Storage, if left in 
Store ten days; if taken away in less than ten days, to half a 
month's Storage. 

The risk of Loss by Fire, unless Insurance be ordered, and of 
Robbery, Theft, and other unavoidable occurrences, is in all cases 
to be borne by the owner of the goods, if the usual care be taken to 
secure the property. 



Pork, ber barrel, 6 
Raisins, pei box, 2 
„ per keg, 3 
Ravens Duck, per 

piece, 2 

Rice, per tierce, 12| 

Rum, per tierce, 18-$ 

" per blig. 25 

« per bbl. 6 

Russia Duck, per 

piece, 2 

Ball Petre,per keg, 3 
Salt, per bushel } 
Sheeting, Russia, 

per piece 1 

Sugar, per hhg. 25 

" per tierce, 18$ 

« per bid. 6 

" Cuba,p.b'x 8 

" Brazil, " 30 

Tallow, per hbg. 20 

Tea, per half chest 5 

" perqr. " 2£ 

" per box, 1£ 

Tin, per box, 2 

Tobacco, pr. hhg. 25 

« pr. ke<r, 3 

Whiskey, per bbl. 6 

Wine, per pipe, 25 

" per h'f pipe 18$ 

" perq'rcask 6 

" per box 3 



Value of various Coins 

France,- 



United States— Eagle, (old em.) $10 66 

Eagle, (new era.) 10 00 

England, — Guinea, - - 5 07 

Pound Sterling, - 4 80 

Sovereign, - - 4 84 

France,— Franc, - - - 18$ 

Louis, (doub. bef. 1786,) 6 69 

Louis, (before 1786,) 4 84 

Louis, (doub. since: 786) 9 14 

Louis, (since 1786,) 4 57 

Livre, - - - 181 



Nap. (doub. or 40 frs,) 

Nap. or -20 francs, - 
Jamaica, — Pound Sterling, 
Bremen, — Rix Dollar, 
Hamburg,— Kix Dollar, - 
Bombay,— Rupee, - 
Holland,— Double Rix Dollar, 

Rix Dollar, - 

Ducat, 

Ten Guilder Piece, 
Spain, — Doubloon, - 



7 70 

3 85 
300 

77 

1 00 
50 

12 20 
604 

2 27 

4 00 
15 53 



Census of the United States, for 1840. 



FREE WHITE MAE 
Under 10 years of age, 
Of 10 and under SO, 

Of 20 and under 40, 
Of 40 and under 60, 
Of 60 and under 80, 
Of 80 and under 100, 
Of 100 and upwards, 

Total males, 



ES. 

2,294,862 

1,635,52] 

2,l*s.x7l 
851,073 
254,273 

24,186 
476 



,2!!»,26fi 



FREE WHITE FEMALES. 
Under 10 years of age, 2,192,270 
Of 10 and under 20, 1 .628,756 
Of 20 and under 40, 2,032,492 
Of 40 and under 60, 806,953 

Of 60 and under 80, 253,861 

Of 80 and under 100, 27,195 

Of 100 and upwards, 308 



• Total females, 6,939,842 

Total free whites, . 14,189.108 



FREE COLORED MALES. 
Under 10 years of age, 56,323 
Of 10 and under 33, 88,10' 

Of 36 and under 55, 28,258 

Of 55 and under 100, 13,493 

Of 100 and upwards, 286 



Total males, 186,46" 



FREE COLORED FEMALES. 
Under 10 years of age, 55,06£ 
Of 10 and ander 36, 98,23." 

Of 36 and under 55, 30,38^ 



Of 55 and under 100, 
Of 100 and upwards, 

Total females, .... 

Total free colored, . 

SLAVES.— Ma! 

Under 10 years of age, 
Of 10 and under 36, 
Of 36 and under 55, 
Of 55 and under 100, 
Of 100 and upwards, 

Total males, 

SLAVES — Femal 
Under 10 years of age, 
Of 10. and under 36, 

of 36 and under 55, 
Of 55 and under 100, 
Of 100 and upwards, 

Total females, .... 

Total slaves, 

Free col'd & slaves, 


15,728 

368 


. 199,778 


. 386345 


ss. 

422,599 
626,504 
145,264 

51,288 
753 


1,246,408 


421,470 

629,862 

139,201 

49,692 

515 


1,240,805 


2,487,213 


2,873,458 



"Total aggregate, 17,062,566 



*Total number of persons 
mi boaril of vessels of war 
in the U. S. Naval service, 

Tune 1, 1840, 6,100 

To which should be ad- 
led, as per co?-reci td census 
if Montgomery CO., Md., • 



Grand total of U. S. ; . . 17.0tj9,463 



White persons included in the 

foregoingjWho are deaf and dumb. 

under 25 years of age, . 3,975 

Over 25, 2,707 

White persons who are 
blind, 5,024 

Insane & Idiots, (whites,) 14,508 

Total number of persons 

employed in mining, . 15,203 

In agriculture, 3,717,758 

In commerce, 117,575 

In manufactures and 
trade, 791,545 

In navigation of the 
ocean, 56,02521 

In learned professions, 65,236 

Of universities or col- 
leges, 



Total number of pensioners for 
revolutionary or military ser- 
vices, 20,797 

Of students in univer- 
sities or colleges, . . 16,233 

Of academies & gram- 
mar schools, .... 3,242 

Of students in acade- 
mies and grammar 
schools, 164,159 

Of primary and common 
schools, 47,209 

Of scholars in common 
schools, 1,845,244 

Scholars at pub'c charge, 468,264 

White persons over 20 
yrs. of age who can- 
not read and write, . 549,693 



Popular and Electoral Votes, 53 

Given for President of the V. States, for the 14th Presidential Term, commenc- 
ing on the 4lh of March, 1841. 



STATES. 


H ar'son 
Ticket. 


V. B. 

Ticket. 


11. 


V 

B 


STATES. 


Har'son 
Ticket. 


V. B. 
Ticket 


H. 


V 
B 


Alabama, - 


28,471 


33,991 




N. Hampshire 


26,434 


32,670 




7 




4,363 


6,049 




3 


New Jersey, 


33,262 


31,034 






Connecti't, 


31,601 


25,296 


8 




New York, • 


225,812 


212.519 


42 




Delaware, 


5,967 


4,884 


3 




N. Carolina, 


46,676 


34,218 






Georgia, - 


40,264 


31,933 


11 




Ohio, - - - - 


148,157 


124,782 






Illinois, - 


45,537 


47,476 




fi 


Pennsylvania, 


144,019 


143,676 


BO 






65,308 


51,695 


9 




Rhode Island, 


6,278 


3.301 






Kentucky, 


58,489 


32,616 


15 




S. Carolina, 


By Leg. 






IJ 


Louisiana, 


11,297 


7,617 


5 




Tennessee, 


60,391 


48,289 






Maine, - - 


16,612 


46,201 


in 




Vermont, - - 


32,445 


18,009 






Mary la ml. 


33,528 
72,874 


28,752 
51,948 


10 
14 




Virginia, - - 


42,501 


43,893 






Massachu., 


1,274,783 


1,128,702 


::>A 


60 


Michigan, • 


22,907 


21,098 


■i 






1,128,702 




m 




Mississippi, 
Missouri, - 


19,518 
22,972 


29 i 760 


4 


4 








174 




146,081 





Tabic exhibiting the Times of Holding the Election of State Officers, 
and the Times of Meeting of the Legislatures of the several States. 



STATES. 



Maine . - - - 
New Hampshire, 
Vermont, - - 
Massachusetts, 

Rhode Island, - 

Connecticut, - 
New York, - 
New Jersey, - 
Pennsylvania, - 
Delware, - - 
Maryland, - - 
Virginia, - - - 
North Carolina, 
South Carolina, 
Georgia, - - - 
Alabama, - - - 
Mississippi, 
Louisiana, - 
Arkansas, - 
Tennessee, - 
Kentucky, - 
Ohio, - - - 
Indiana, - - 
Illinois, - - 
Missouri, - - 
Michigan, 



Times of Holding 
Elections. 



2d Monday in Septem'r. 
2d Tuesday in March, 
1st Tuesday in Sept'r. 
2d Monday in Novem'r. 

( Gov. & Sen. in April. 

I Rep. in April and Aug, 
1st Monday in April. 
1st Monday in Novem'r. 
2d Tuesday in October. 
2d Tuesday in October. 
2d Tuesday in Novem'r. 
1st Wednesday in Oct 
4th Thursday in April. 
Commonly in August. 
2d Monday in October. 
1st Monday in October. 
1st Monday in August. 
1st Mon. & Tue. Nov. 
1st Monday in July. 
1st Monday in October. 
1st Thursday in August 
1st Monday in August 
2d Tuesday in October. 
1st Monday in August, 
lsc Monday in August. 
1st Monday in Augus t 
1st Monday in October. 



Times of the Meeting of the 
Legislatures. 



t Wednesday in January. 
1st Wednesday in June. 
2d Thursday in October. 
1st Wednesday in January. 
1st Wed. in May and in June. 
Last Wed. in Oct. and in Jan. 
1st Wednesday in May. 
1st Tuesday in January. 
4th Tuesday in October. 
1st Tuesday in January. 
1st Tuesday in Jan., biennially. 
Last Monday in December. 
1st Monday in December. 
2d Monday in Nov. biennially. 
4th Monday in November. 
1st Monday in November. 
1st Monday in November; 
1st Monday in Jan., biennially. 
1st Monday in January. 
2d Monday in Oct'r, biennially. 
1st Monday in Oct'r, biennially. 
1st Monday in December. 
1st Monday in December. 
1st Monday in December. 
1st Monday in Dec. biennially. 
1st Monday in Nov. biennially. 
1st Monday in November. 



Population of the principal Cities in the U.S. and their distances from Washington 



Towns. 


Pop. 


lis 


Towns. 


Pop. 


dis. 


Towns. 


Pop. dis. 




8459 


Georgetown, 
Mobile, - - 


7312 


2 


Providence, 


23171 394 




933a3 


m 


12672 


103:; 


Philadelphia, 


220423 136 




102313 


X- 


Sew York, 


312710 


72f; 


Richmond, 


20153| 222 




46338 


147 


New Orleans, 


102913 


12 Oo 


Savannah, 


112141662 




29261 


W4 


New Haven, 


12960 


301 


St. Louis, 


16469 856 


Frederick, 


5182 


4:. 


Portland, 


15218 


542 


Washington, 


233461 



|G .-a 

s-si' 3 - 

ft! 



* 5!H*3 

I fill 

^ 5 n L is 

* * ^) w H 



Jh £ 3 J ° \- 

2 Sfl.il 



1**8] 

gGta — ^ 

O 5?U ° 53 

HHO C = 

Sb3£ = 



rt ^3 O 



s . - 



is 



pry fii i.. 

!iif«'^ifl'-Jl 












5 "3 

3 i|l I ^t'llSj 






a - £ * ~ <* c' 5 

S. -.2 s> :; SSp,-* 



— j "J ^ _L1 3 ^ ,JH l • '/, ^, " " * 2L "i - <-" ,", — — -V „'k— I t_Z «-i eft ^ 



- -i ~ 3 .- _S ~ — -o 




o o j| = §^^J".;ii^ t £ £ § § '~~ 

.-£ .-£ S «; ^ = o s - i' _= - — i< S o oj « « 

Q O s,QgK^QfaE:o ^Kjji. uJ Kl v. 

C o 

g O •••'••'•• 

o c 

u rt • • ■ • i i 

| 5 •„- 

o ■- ctfv . 

■« ^ ™ - ? oi ; i " - -'" : J ;^'->" 



BALTIMORE POST OFFICE. 55 

COURT OF APPEALS, Western Shore— aha at Annapolis on tbe second 
Monday of June and first Monday ofDi i i mber. R. W. Gill, C/'k. 

Eastern Shore— sits at Easton on the first Monday of June and third Monday 
of November. Thomas C. Nicho! 

Post Office and Mail Arrangements. 

Office at the N. /'-'. cottier of North and Fayette sts. 
THOMAS FINLEY, Post Master ; ( '. T. M ADDOX. Chief Clerk. 

The office is open for bu ■ . !.. in Winter season from 7 A- M. 

to6o'clock, P.M.— Summer from 1 ! \ t6A.M to 7 P. M— on Sundays from 
9 to 10 o'clock, A. M-, and out- hour after the arrival of the Eastern Mail in the 
afternoon. 

Persons who have private boxi . < r who make arrangements with their "car- 
riers," wishing to }> iy I'll.',- '.;i l-li.-r- loi t lansmi sion , after the office is 
an d i so I .-. pi tting a slip ol | ipei round their letters specifying the 
number of piece to be charged 

Great Eastern, ...... 

" Southern, 

" Western, 

Washington Citj Extra, .... 

Frederick and Ellkott's Mills Extra, • 

Norfolk and Portsmouth, .... 

Annapolis, except Sundays, - 

North West, \ ia York, Harrisburg, Pittsburg and Cham- 
bersburg, except Sundays, - - • 

Winchester, Harper's Ferry, &c. 

Gettysburg, via Westminster, 1;. i-1 r.-town and Pikes- 

ville, on Mondays Wedni ; ind Fridays, - 
Hanover, York Springs, Manchester, &c on Mondays, 

Wednesdays and Fridays, .... 
Abingdon, Bel Air. Churchville, &c. Tuesday Th.and Sat 

:t Franklin, Randlestov a, , L , i . 
Emmitsburg, via Uniontown, Taneytown, &c. Mondays, 

and Thursday s. - - - - - ' 

Poplar Springs, llidgevill, Catonsville, &c. Mondays, 
Wednesdays and Friday.-, ] 

Towsontown and Govanstown, Tues. Thurs. and Sat. 

The Mails for the minor offices in Cecil, Kent, Dorchester, Talbot, Caroline, 
and Queen Anne's counties, and B. C. Springs and Quantico, close on Sunday, 
Tuesday and Fridaj nights a1 9; and for the county towns on Monday. Wed- 
nesday and Saturday, at 8 A. M ; and are due on Tuesday Thursday and Snuday 
athali-past 3, P. M. 

The minor offices in Somerset and Worcester, on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, 
and principal parts of Delaware, close on .Monday. Wednesday and Saturday at 
!.', P. M.; county towns on Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday, at 8, A. M. 

Canard's Royal Mail Line of Steam packets leave Boston for Liverpool, (via 

Halifax,) on the first and fifteenth of the months of April, May, June, July, 

August, September and October, and on the first day of the months of November. 

December, January, Februarj and March. In these mails, letters from any part 

of the United States, addressed to any person, or to tlie care of an}' person, in the 

kingdoms of Great Britain or France, may be sent by paying the postage from the 

place of deposit to Boston;— from Boston to Liverpool the postage vsjree. 

RATES OF POSTAGE, 

On a Single Letter composed of one piece of paper. 

For any distance not exceeding 30 miles, 6 cents. 

Over 30 and not exceeding 80 " 10 " 

Over 80 and not execeeding 150 '' 12 •« 

Over 150 arid not exceeding 400 •' 18 " 

Over '100 miles, •« 25 " 

Letters are advertised on the 1st and 15th of every month. 
Letters charged double, and supposed to be only single, must be opened in the 
presence of some one belonging to the office, otherwise the postage cannot be 
refunded. 



' Closes. 


Due. 


8 a.m. 


4 p.m. 


3 p.m. 


9 a.m. 


9 p.m. 


3 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


7 p.m. 


2 1-2 p.m. 


none. 


3 p.m. 


8a.m. 


8 a.m. 


9 a.m. 


7 1-2 a.m. 


3 1 2p.m 


9 p.m. 


3 p.m. 


8 a.m. 


1 p.m. 


9 p.m. 


7 p.m. 


8 a.m. 


3 p.m. 


9 p.m. 


6 p.m. 


9 p.m. 


7 p.m. 


9 p.m. 


7 p.m. 


9 p.m. 


9 a.m. 



56 Post Offices in Maryland. 

The column ofjigures designates the Rate of Postage on Letters from Baltimore. 



ALLEGHANY CO 

Bevansville, . 
Cumberland, . 
Dawson's, . . 
Flintstone, 
Friendsville, . 
Frostburg, . . 
Little Crossings, 
Lona Coning, . 
Orleans, . . 
Oldtown, . . 
Rhinehart's, . 
Selbysport, . 
Smith's Farm, 
Sang Run, 
Westernport, . 
Yough Glades, 
ANNE ARUNDEL. 

Annapolis, 
Beaver Dam, 
Brotherton, 
Bristol, . . 
Cookeville, 
Cecil Tavern, 
Davidsonville, 
Elk Ridge Land'g 
Ellicott's Mills, 
Elysville, . . 
Friendship, 
Horse Head, . 
Lisbon, . . . 
Marriotts ville, 
Oakland Mills, 
Owingsville, . 
Patuxent Forge, 
Poplar Spring, 
Savage, . . . 
Tracey's Landing 
West River, . . 
Woodstock, . . 
BALTIMORE CO. 
Brooklandville, . 
Caton ville, . . 
Fork Meeting H. 
Franklin, . . . 
Golden, .... 
Govanstown, . . 
Hereford, . . . 
Little Gunpowder 
Long Green, . . 
Maryland Line, . 
Owing's Mills, . 
Pikesville, . . . 
Randallstown, . 



Reistertown, . • 
St. James, . . . 
Shewan, . . . 
Towsontown, 
Union Meeting H. 
WestermansMills 
Warren, . . . 
Weisesburg, . . 

CALVERT CO. 

Huntingdon, . 
Lower Marlboro, 
Port Republic, . 
Prince Frederick, 
St. Leonard's, 

CARROLL CO. 

Backman's Mills, 
Brueeville, 
Carroll, . 
Dennings, . . 
Double Pipe Cr'k; 
Finksburg, . . 
Freedom, . . 
Hampstead, . 
Hood's Mills, . 
Manchester, . 
Middleburg, . 
New Windsor, 
Porter's, . . 
Sykesville, . . 
Taney Town, . 
Union Bridge, 
Union Mills, . 
Waterloo, . . 
Westminster, . 
Wakefield, . 

CAROLINE CO 

Burrsville, . . 
Denton, . . . 
Greensborough, 
Hillsborough, . 
Upper Hunt.Cr'k 

CECIL COUNTY. 

Brick Meeting H 
Blue Ball, . 
Cecillon, . 
Charlestown, 
Conewngo, 
Elkton, . . 
Ewingsville, 
Farmington, 
Fayette, 
North East, 
Perry ville, . 



Port Deposite, . 

Principio, . . . 

I Rising Sun, . . 

Rock Springs, . 

Rowlandsville, . 

St. Augustine, . 

Warwick, . . . 

CHARLES CO. 

Allen's Fresh, . 

Benedict, . . . 

I Bryantown, . . 

Gallant Green, . 

Milton Hill, . . 

Nanjenvoy, . . 

Newport, . . . 

Partnership, . . 

Pomonkey, . . 

Port Tobacco, . 

DORCHESTER. 

Big Mills, . . . 
Cambridge, . . 
Church Creek, . 
E. New Market, . 
Federalsburg, . . 
Giffith J. Robin's,. 
Hicksburg, . . . 
Quantico, . . . 
Tobacco Stick, . 
Vienna, .... 

FREDERICK CO 

Adamsville, . . 
Barry, . . . . 
Beallsville, . . 
Bridgeport, . . 
Buckeystown, . 
Burkettsville, . . 
Creagerstown, . 
Emmitsburg, . . 
Frederick, . . . 
Foxville, . . . 
Greenfield Mills, 
Graceham, . . 
Jamesville, . . 
Jefferson, . . . 
Johnsville, . . . 
Knoxville, . . . 
Ladiesburg, . . 
Liberty, . . . 
McKinstrys Mills 
Mechanickstown 
Middle town, . . 
Monrovia, . . . 
Mount Pleasant, 



10 
10 

10 
10 
10 
10 
10 

10 
12?, 

10 
12-5- 
10 

i-4 

10 
10 

m 

1-2.V 

\2l 

12i 
12| 

m 
m 



IT OFFICES IN MARYLAND 



New Market, 
Peters ville, 

Point of Rocks, . 

Ridgevffle, . . . 

SabellisviUe, . . 

Sam's Creek, . . 

Smithsbury, . . 

Unioiiville, . . 

Urbana, . . . . 

Utica Mills, . . 

Walkersville, . . 

Warfieldsburg, . 

Wolfeville, . . 

Woodsborough, . 

HARFORD CO. 

Abingdon, . . . 
Bel-Air,. . . . 
Black Horse, . . 
Carman's, . . . 
Darlington, . . 
Dublin, .... 
Deer Cr'k Works, 
Guetown, . . . 
Grey Bock, . . 
Hall's ^ Roads, . 
Havre-de-Grace, 
Hickory, . . . 
Jarrettsville, . . 
Micnaelsville, 
Perryman's, . . 
Robinson's .Store, 
Rock Run, . '. 
KENT COUNTY. 

Chestertown, . . 
Georgetown A R. 
Head of Sassafras 
Millington, 
Rock Hall, . 
MONTGOMERY 

Bamesville, . 

Brookville, 



iCottage, 
Colesville, . 
Damascus, 
Darnestown, 
IDawsonviUe, 
Goshen, 
Hyattstown, 
Middlebrook, 
Poolsville, 
RockviUe, . , 
Sandy Spring, 
Unity, . . . 

PRINCE GEORGE 

Aquasco, . . . 
Beltsville, . . . 
iBIadensburg, . . 
Brandywine, . . 
'Fort Washington, 
Good Luck, . . 
Laurel Factory, . 
Long O. Field, . 
Nottingham, . . 
Palmers I . 
Piscataway, . . 
Queen Ann, . . 
Upper Marlboro, . 

ST. MARYS CO. 
Chaptico, . . . 
Charlotte Hall, . 
Clifton Factor}-, . 
Leonardtown, . 
Ridge, . . . . 
Sassafras &. Oak, 
St. Clements Bay, 

St. Inegoes, . . 

SOMERSET CO. 

Barren Cr'k Sp'gs 
Kingston, . . . 
Princess Ann, 
Rehoboth, . . . 



Salisbury, . • 
White Haven, 

TALBOT CO. 
Easton, . . . 
Royal Oak, . 
St. Michael's, 
Trappe, . . . 

WASHINGTON 
Bakersville, . 
[Beaver Creek, 
Boonsborough, 
Brownsville, . 
ICavetown, . . 
Clear Spring, . 
Chews ville, . 
Funkstown, . 
Hagerstovvn, . 
Hancock, . . 
Leitersburg, . 
Mountain House; 
Park Head, . • 
Rohrersville, . • 
Sharpoburg, . • 
WilUamsport, 
WORCESTER CO. 
Berlin, . . . . 
Derickson's X E. 
Newark, . . . 
Newtown, . . . 

jo* 'Poplartown, . , 

12? St. Martin's, . . 

l2 | Sandy HiU, . . 

101 iSnow Hill,. . . 

12! iWhaleysville, , 

[<U QUEEN ANN CO. 

lot Broad Creek, . . 

2 |lBullocktown, . . 

[Centreville. . . 

lQi'jLong Marsh, . . 

12| Queenstown, . . 
12.V jSudlers X Roads, 

12$ I Wye Mills, . . 



57 



i-H 



Sheriffs of the City and Comity of Baltimore. 

WILLIAM D. BALL, Sheriff. 

DEPUTIES. 
City David W. Hudson, Calvert street, south of Saratoga. 

" Robert Wilson, Aisquith, north of Monument street. 

" Samuel R. Hvser, BiilJle street, near Pennsylvania avenue. 

James Ridgely, boards at Bradshaw's U. S. Hotel, Pratt street. 

" Thomas Mullen, S. E. corner of Eutaw and New streets. 

" Lorin N. Decker, Ensor, near Monument street, (Old Town.) 

County . . • William Turner, near Franklin. 

" Selman Cox, near Walkersville. 

" Nimrod Chapman, Reistertown. 



RAIL ROADS, STAGES, PACKETS, STEAMBOATS. 

(Corrected for the Business Directory, January 1, 1842.J 
Philadelphia, Wil. & Baltimore Rail Road. 

Passenger office at the Depot, Pratt street. 
Freight office corner of President and Fleet streets, City Block, where goods 
are received, forwarded and delivered, during the winter months, between the 
hours of 8 A. M. and 3 P. M., daily, (Sundays excepted.) During the summer, 
the through freight is taken by the Union Steam Boat Line, from the lower end 
of South street wharf. 

In winter the Passenger Train, with the U. S. Mail, departs for Philadelphia, 
from the Pratt street Depot, daily, at 9 o'clock, A. M., passing through— 
To Stemmer's Run, ■ - - 9 miles. To Havre-de-Grace, - - • 36 miles. 

Chase's House, - - - - 15 " Elkton, 61 *' 

Harewood, 17 " Wilmington, 70 " 

Gunpowder, 19 " Chester, 85 " 

Perryman's, ----- 28 " Philadelphia, 98 " 

Arriving in Philadelphia at about 4 o'clock, P. M.— Fare, $4.00. 
Returning, leaves the corner of 11th and Market streets, Philadelphia, daily, at 
8 A. M., and arrives in Baltimore at about 3 o'clock, P. M. 

In summer, two daily trains are run in each direction, (except on Sundays,) 
when the mail train only is run. 

Names if Agents :— A. CRAWFORD, Baltimore, and JOHN FRAZIER, 
Wilmington, Superintending Agent3 ; S. R Abbott, Baltimore, R. M. Ma- 
graw, Havre-de- Grace. Geo. W. Moore, Cecil, Z. Rudulph, Elkton, J. R. Hig- 
gins, Wilmington, and W. L. Ashmead, Philadelphia, Ticket Agents; John 
Royer, Robert Hill, Win. Adrean, and Collins Denny, Conductors of Trains. 

Baltimore and Susquehanna Rail Road. 

The passenger cars run daily, (Sundays excepted,) to York and Columbia, 
starting from the Ticket office, No. 56, North, near Saratoga street. 

Leave Baltimore at 8 1-2 o'clock, a. m. 

York, 13-4 " p.m. Fare, - $2 00 

Arrive in Columbia 3 "p.m. - - " - - 2 62 

Returning, leave Columbia at 9 o'clock, a. m. and arrive in Baltimore at three 
o'clock, p. m. 

By the above arrangement, a connection is formed at Columbia with cars and 
stages to and from Philadelphia, Lancaster, Hatrisburg, Carlisle, &c. 

Goods intended for transportation to any point on this road, received daily, 
(Sundays excepted,) at the Belvidere Depot, North street extended, only be- 
tween the hours of 8, a. m. and 4, p. m. A ticket, stating the kind and quantity, 
to whom, and by whom sent, must accompany the articles, and if a receipt is 
required, one must also be sent for the AgeRt to sign. Nothing can be forwarded 
to points on the line of the road between y#rk an d Baltimore, unless the freight 
is previously paid. D. C. H. BORDLEY, Superintendent. 

Baltimore and Ohio Rail Road* 

(Depot in Pratt, between Light and Charles streets.) 

Merchandise for transportation to the several Depots on the line of the " Main 
Stem" and " Washington Branch," is received at the Depot, in Pratt st, daily, 
between the hours of 8 a. m. and 3 p. m., under the following regulations, viz. : 

1st.— AH goods offered for transportation must be distinctly marked, and be 
accompanied by a list, in duplicate, of the number and description of Packages 
to be forwarded, the name of the consignee and of the party forwarding the 
same — otherwise they cannot be received. 

2nd.— Goods destined for delivery on the line of the Winchester Rail Road, 
must be consigned to the care of the " Agent of the Winchester and Potomac 
Rail Road Co." at Harper's Ferry ; and as the Baltimore and Ohio Rail Road 
Company do not permit consignments to be made to its Agents, commodities in- 
tended for individuals residing at places distant from the rail road, or lor trans- 
shipment to Canal Boats, must be consigned to some resident at the point of 
delivery on the road, known to the Agent— otherwise they cannot be received. 

3d.— Cotton and other articles requiring extraordinary care and space, will be 
forwarded, only, under special contract 



PACKETS 



TEAM BOAT! 



r,u 



4th. — The freight accruing- upon all commodities destined for any point of de- 
livery on the main road and Washington Branch, where the Company have no 
Agent, must he paid on delivery of the goods to the Forwarding Agent, at 
Pratt street Depot. 

5th. — The freight accruing upon all produce brought in on the road, must be 
paid on delivery. Entire car loads of commodities will be delivered at any de- 
signated point on the city tracks, but fractions of loads wUl be delivered only at 
Mount Clare Depot. 

The Passenger Trains of this Company depart daily from the Ticket Office 
in Pratt 3treet, as follows, viz . 

MAIN STEM.— from Baltimore, 

For Ellicott's Mills, at 7£ a. m.lFor Frederick, at 

Ellicott's Mills, at 3^p m,| Frederick, at 

FOR BALTIMORE, 

From El. Ms, at 8 a. m., 12} p. m. I From Frederick, ■ 

Fredeiick, at . . 10 a.m.| Harper's Ferry, at 8£ "a. m. 

WASHINGTON BRANCH.— from Baltimore, 
For Washington, at ..9a. m. | For Washington, at . . . 4 p. m. 

FOR BALTIMORE, 

From Washington, at . . 6 a. m. | From Washington, at . 4 p. m. 

Distances and Rates of Fare to the several Stopping Places on the 

line of the "Main St em," from Baltimore, 



. 7i a. m. 
. 3ip. m. 

at 10 p. m. 



DEPOTS. 



To Relay House, 
Avalon, 
flchester, 
Gray's Bridge, 
Ellicott's Mills 
Elysville, 
Dorsey's Run, 
Woodstock, 



u 


Fr. 


B 


■■',] 


o 


37 


ia 


60 


13 


50 


14 


60 


IV 


Ii in 


■J] 


1 1 i.i 


34 


1'jni 



DEPOTS. 

ToMarriottsville, 
Sykesville, 
Hood's Mills, 
Woodbine, 
Mount Airy, 
Plane No. 4, 
Monrovia, 
Ijamsville, 



M 


Fn. 




•:; 


137 


' 


31 


I5fi 




U 


170 




37 


1.-7 




4:; 


218 




45 


.:■:.-, 




Ifl 


250 




".:■! 


.V,- 





DEPOTS. 



I'oMonocacy, 
Frederick, 
Buckeysto'n rd. 
Doup's Switch. 
Point of Rocks. 
Berlin. 
Knoxville, 
Harper's Ferry 



287 

:;i in 
30 i 

:;.u 

376 
B1I400 



Distances and Rates of Fare to the several Stojiping Places on the 
line of the "W as hington Branch ," from Baltimore, 



To Relay House, 
Elkridge Lan'g 
Jessup°s Cut, 
Patuxent, 



« 


Fa.' 


R 


B0 


fl 


r,i 


16 


96 


17 


106 



DEPOTS. 

To Annapolis R.B. 
Savage R. K. 
Lanrel, 
White Oak Bot. 



M 


Fa. 


1 


I- 


LIS 


h 


If) 


1M 




CI 


131 




34 


10 


1 



DEPOTS, 



To Beltsville, 
Paint Branch, 
Biaden^burg, 
Washington, 



2Vl 



Passengers by the morning train from Washington, can connect with the 
Western train at the Relay House ; and those destined South that may come 
by the train from Winchester, Harper's Ferry and Frederick, reach the Relay- 
House in ample time to dine and take the evening train for Washington, where 
they arrive at 6 p. m. 

The personal baggage of each passenger is limited to 60 lb.~. 

Packages weighing 13 lbs. or less, convej'ed by the passenger trains any dis- 
tance not exceeding 31 miles, for 12 1-2 cents, and one-third of a cent for every ad- 
ditional mile. Packages of more than 12 and not exceeding 60 lbs., conveyed 12 
miles or less, for twelve-and-a-half cents, and three-fourths of a cent for every 
additional mile. W. S. WOODSIDE, Superintendent of Transportation. 

JAS. MURRAY, Superintendent of Railway & Machinery. 
D. S. FOLEY, Agent for Passengers and Tonnage. 

Stages, Routes, etc. from Baltimore. 

Abingdon, Bel Air and Churchville, leaves Habersett's Hotel, North High street 
every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, at 9 o'clock, A. M. Distance to Bel 
Air29 miles; Fare $1.50. Returning leaves Churchville at 7, A. M. 



60 RAIL ROADS, STAGES, PACKETS, STEAMBOATS. 



Hiihimurr and ll'/ui ■>hi^, \ ia the Baltimore ami Ohio Kail Uoad to Frederick, 
by Stages : 



Dist. Fare 

Thence to Hagerstown, - 26 m. $2,00 
" Hancock, • 26 '■ 2,00 

" Cumberland, - 41 " 3,00 



DiM. Fare. 

i I,, ir . I" Washington, - if.) m *,"'< 

Wheeling, - 32'" 3,00 

Baltimore to Wheeling, - 285 " 18,00 



bail. 




Ditt. 


Taa 




Charleston, S. C.f 


• 160 in. 


681 


09 


Augusta, Ga.# 


- 160 " 


741 


74 


Mifledgi ville,*and| 


- 102 " 


843 


96 


Columous,t- 


- 124 " 


967 


;oi 


Montgomery, Ala.| 


. 85 •' 


1062 


i.'i 


VIobile.+jorf 


• 174 " 


1CJG 



For further information, apply a 1 the siv. Hail Koad and Steamboat office. 
of Messrs. Stockton St Falls, adjoining the Pratt street Depot, or to Messrs. 
Hutchinson, Weart & Co.,H >. l t Pratt street, opposite the Depot. 
i h.tru.-i.'ii an I MobiU , front the offii e of Stockton & Falls, adjoining the Depot, 

Pratt street, through to 

Dist. 
Washington,* - 40 m. 

Fredericksburg, Va.f • 69 " 
Kichmond,* - - 65 " 

,# • • 22 " 
Weldon, N. C* - - 65 % 
Wilmington,* - • 1G0 " 

At Fredericksburg, V;t., commences the route, via CharlottsvilJe, to the Vir- 
ginia .Springs. At Petersburg, commences the Raleigh and Ga.-ton rail road,146 
miles in length, from which lines of stages 1, ave for Fa\ ette\ ill,., Camden. &,c. 

Qj' For hours of departure from Baltimore, see Bait. Ac Washington railroad. 
*By Rail Road. \By Steamboat. %Lly Stage, 

Packets. 

In the. following list of Packets will be found the names of places, hues, and 

persons to whom application should be made, Ace. 
Alexandria and Georgetown, weekly. Wm. Rhoads, No. 61 Smith's wharf. 
Boston, (regular Commercial Line,) weekly. T. K .Matthews, 10 Bowlys wharf. 
" (Union and Despatch Line,) weekly. Clark & Kellogg, 16 Bowly's wh'f. 
Cambridge, (E. Shore, Md.) semi- weekly. J. Hooper Ac Sons, Light st wharf. 
Charleston and Savannah. John K. Randall, No. 104 Smith's wharf. 
Church Creek, (Dorchester Co., Md.) J. Hooper Ac Sons, 16 Light street whf. 
Hartford, Conn., semi-monthly. Rutherford and Hurlbut, 11 Bowly's wharf. 
Mobile, St. Maries's, St. Joseph's and Apalacbicola, semi-monthly. Joseph Hin- 

key, corner of Pratt street and Spear's wharf. 
New York and Philadelphia, weekly. Wm. Rhoads, No 61 Smith's wharf. 
" " Joseph Hankey, corner of Pratt st. &. Spear's wh'F. 

" (old Line,) — from Frederick street dock, weekly. Isaiah Mankiu, 

corner of Gay and Pratt streets, (up stairs.) 
" (Brown's Regular Line,) semi-weekly. J .W. Brown, 59 Smith's whf. 

New Orleans, fromFenby's wharf, semi-monthly Clark & Kellogg, Bowly's whf. 
u and Mobile, semi-monthly , W. Moore, cor. Pratt st. &, Smith's wf. 

Norfolk, Petersburg and Richmond, weekly. Joseph Hankey corner of Pratt 
street and Spear's wharf. 
" Petersburg and Richmond, (new regular Line,) weekly. Willliazn 
Moore, corner of Pratt st. and Smith "s wharf. 
Philadelphia, (Hand's Line.) tri-weekly. J. W. Brown, No. 59 Smith's wharf. 
Salisbury, (Eastern Shore, Md.) J. Hooper & Sons, 16 Light st- wharf. 

Steam Boats Leave 

For Annapolis, Cambridge, &c. Tuesdaysand Fridays. Lower end Dugnr.'s whf. 
" Alexandria, Washington & Georgetown, every Saturday. Commerce st'.wht 
" Fredericksburg, every Saturday, or oftener. Light street wharf. 
" Fair Haven, every Tuesday. Lower end of Dugan's wharf. 
" Havre-de-Grace and Port Deposite, on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Satur* 

days. Lower end of Patterson's wharf. 
" Norfolk &. Portsmouth, daily, from 15th March, to IstDec'r. Lower end of 

Spear's wharf. — From 1st Dec. to 15th March, tri-weekly. Light st. whf. 
" Philadelphia, daily, (except Sundays.) from early in the spring, until late in 

the fall. Lower end of South street wharf 
" Patuxent River, every Thursday. Lower end of Dugan's wharf. 
" Petersburg and Richmond, every Saturday, or oftener, from early in the 

spring, until late in the fall. Light street wharf. 



City Government, for 1842. 61 

SAMUEL BRADY, Mayor. 

Jesse Hdnt, Register. | Jacob Yundt, Assist. Register. 

William L. Marshall, attorney and Counsellor for the City. 

J.B. Seidenstricker, CoVr.\ S. Myers, CVk to the Mayoralty. 

CITY COUNCIL. 



MEMBERS OF Tlir; SECOND BRANCH. 



Ward3. 

1 James Frazier, 

2 John E. Stansbury 

3 Samuel Boyd, 

4 Robert Howard, 



Wards. 

5 William Reany, 

6 John S. Gittings, 

7 Fieldin 

8 William J- Wight 
13 William Wilson, | 14 Daniel Bender. 

OFFICERS. 
ROBERT HOWARD, President: A. 11. PENNINGTON, Clerk. 

MEMBERS OF THE FIRST BRANCH. 



Wards. 
9 George W. Krebs, 

10 William Baruet, 

1 1 Samuel Jot 

12 Joseph Hook, jr. 



Wards. 

1 Joseph A. Ramsay, 
Henry R. Lauderman. 

2 James Ramsay, 
William Rochester. 

3 William D. Roberts, 
Peregrine Gorsuch. 

1 John F. Hoss, 
Charles Pendergast. 

13 Valentine Dushane, 
William A. Hack. 

OFFICERS. 

HENRY SNYDER, Prasident: H. W. GRAY, Chief Clerk 

PHILIP MUTH, Jr. Assistant Clerk. 



Wards. 

5 James 0. McC'ormick 

Elijah Hutton. 
b" Henry Staj lor, 
Abraham Blakeney. 

7 Wm. H.Cole, jr. 
Richard Br: 

8 A. C. Ludlow, 
Samuel H. Tagart. 

14 



Wards. 

9 Daniel Schwarzaner. 
Levi Taylor. 

10 Samuel Norris, 
James Dunn. 

11 Charles Towson. 
Aquilla H. Greenfield. 

12 Joshua Stinchcomb, 
James Peregoy. 

Henry Snyder, 



Jacob Zimmerman. 



Commissioners of Finance. 

Samuel Brady, | J. I. Donaldson, 

James Howard. 

Commissioners of Public Schools. 



I John Bigham, 
William Krebs, 
Charles Gilman, 
Jesse Slingluff, 
William Wilson. 



J. W. Randolph, 
J. F. Monmonier, 
Jacob Heald, 
Thomas Finley, 
Joseph King. jr. 
Matthew Shaw, 

Distributors (if the Fund for the Widows 
and Orphans of those wlio fell in the 
defence of the city. 

Samuel Moore, | John Reese. 

Visiters of the Jail for Baltimore City 

and County. 
John B. Prey, I Wm. Fusselbaugh, 
James Spillman, | David C. Springer. 

Trustees for the Poor. 

John King, I Lemuel G. Gosnell, 

Samuel Rankin, vice G. R. Mosher 

William Dawson, | resigned. 

Ward Managt 

John F. Monmonier 

Joseph Ramsay, jr. 

P.M. Holbrook, 

Christian Medinger, 



Directors on the part of the city in the 

Bait. $ Ches. Steam Towini Co. 
Charles Reeder, | William Bose, 
John Robinson. 

Arbitrators tipon the Inspection of Sale 
Leather, and rough Harness, and 
rough Skirting Leather. 

Thomas Sewell, | Mark Jenkins, 
Elmer Hewett. 

('■iinmissionersfor Opening Streets. 
John Dushane, | John S. Hollins, 

Anthony Miltenberger. 
Arbitrators upon the Inspection of Green 

Hides and Skins, <fc. 

A. Gould, Butcher, | W. Mill?, Tanner, 

John Q. Hewlett, dealer in Leather. 

Reviewers of Flour. 

J2SS!Br , } ,tak — 

A^mBuckwater,| Mercbant6 . 

Lloyd Moxley, 
Samuel Wilson, 
•j of the Poor. 

5 Patrick McKew, I 9 Hamlet Duvall, 

6 William Cole, sen. 10 James George, 

7 Philip Mutli, jr. 11 Vacant, 

8 Alexander Russel, sen. I 12 Rezin Wight. 



Millers. 



i,i 



CITY GOVERNMENT OF BALTIMORE 



Assessors qf Tax. 
George Myers, | Joseph Brown. 

c Court, in,, i. r Sta Taa ■ 
George Myers | Joseph Brown, 

.l.ilm ii.S.'i.li-Mstricker. 



City C 



and Wardens of the 



John Rodgers, | Henry Wigart, 
Josiah Rbeim. 
Robert B. Varden, Clerk. 
Co, 



v.. i 



qj Hi . 
I G. Rodenmayi 



rd Marley 

Isaac Glass. 

Col. D. Harris, Clerk. 
Inspectors. 
Philemon Towson, B utcr and Lard. 

G t"oss, do do 

Felix Denvier, Fla e i • •'. 



Adam Seltzer, Beef and Pork. 

simi.i !,.'nii,. ii',: : /,r:,\ i,;</uid MeasU 
Fobn Rick tor, hong and Dry do 
Peter I.. Auk' n, P« <///</ Pearl Ashes. 

I,' I'. Iton, 7'»/y;, ,,/hr . 

John \\ . McNeil} , Charcoal. 

Inspectors of' While and lied Oak Stoves 
and Itcadin^— Eastern District. 

Ja nes Diamond, | William M..nk 

II, tern District. 
T. M. Davidson, I Willian Denni 
William Rapley, John Cousins. 
T. S. Wei l< 
Samuel Steele, Usayer qf Silver Plate. 

Keep :rt qfthe City Spi 
Elijah S. Milbonrue, Calvert street. 
David Nichols, Charles do 
Thomas H. Lamden, Eastern Fauni'n. 
Andrew Simpson, Public Walk. 
J, uues McCleary, Gunpowder. 



Sap; 



1 Robert McElwee, hi 

2 Jain ; R. Conway, li 

3 Daniel Cox, 17 

Chrks of Markets. 
Jacob D. Hair, Centre Market. 
Ezekiel Burke, do. Assistant, 

George M Smith, J Ian voer, 
Charles Fox, Fells' Point. 
Samuel Thompson, Lexington. 
Nicholas Sanks, do. Assistant 

Henry Zeater, Bel Air. 
Henry Vineyard, Uirhmond. 
James F. Shaw, HoUins. 

Justices of the Peace to receive the re- 
ports of the Night Watch. 
William Stewart, Western District. 
George W. King, Middle do 
William B. Jones, Eastern do 



indents qf Chimney Sweepers. 

G ioree li. Long, | 8 William K. Boyle, 



Win. M. Henderson, 9 Edward Hastier. 
Solomon Conoway, 10 Levi Hampton, ' 

John Reynolds, 111 William Faithful. 

t apti tins qfthe N. Watch. East. Dist. 
William Costigan, | Kich'd R. Bishop. 

Ma/d'e District. 
A. I. W. Jackson, | Thomas Gilford. 

Western District. 

Geo. B. Sumwalt, | Thomas Mullen. 

Lieutenants qf the Night Watch. 

Eastern District. 

Edward Horney, | Ormsby Webster. 

Middle District 
William E. Beal, I John Holt?., 
Richard Patterson, [ M. Christopher. 

Western District. 
John Roy, I Corbin Sanks, 

John Kremer, | George Keilholtz. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

John Mitciiell, High Constable. | Jacob Cook, Deputy H. Cons. 

City Bailiff's and Police Officers. 
Wards. 

1 Henry P. Ruley, 
■2 Henry S. McDonald, 
3 Michael Shock, 
■t Joseph Stewart. 

13 Wi 



Wards. 

1 James W. Shaw. 

1 Charles F. Miller, 
•2 Jacob Wellslager, 

2 George Malonee, 

3 Alexander Thompson, 

3 John Magill, 

I John P. Youee, 

4 John Cunningham, 

5 Charles Scott, 

5 Win. H. Bombarger, 



w 


irds. 


W 


irds. 


1 


James H. Denson, 


9 


Henry Chisholm, 


fi 


Daniel E. Myers, 


10 


Peter Hit/.elhcrger, 
T. J. McLaughlin, 


7 


George R. Campbell, 


11 


8 


Andrew J. Keller, 


12 


James League, 


iUM 


Allen, 11 Philip 
City Bailiffs. 


Fu 


ler. 


Wards 


Wards 


fi 


John Maydwell, 


in 


Charles A. Schwatka 


ii 


Charles Craemer, 


li 


William McCoy, 


7 


( leorge Smith, 


12 


Henry White. 


7 


Daniel Hamer, 


15 


John D. Bowman, 


8 


('mi rail Eberhart, 




John V. Woodall, 


8 


\\ n an Patterson, 




Jacob Hartzell, 


9 


Stephen Darden, 




Henrv Wortbington, 


II 


Richard Cowman, 




Peter P. Potee, 


LO 


Bi pjamin Gaither, 




Henry Washington, 


10 


Pefc r Kreis, 
William A. Partlett. 




James J. Patterson, 



Members of tlie Legislature of Maryland, 03 

DECEMBER SESSION, 1841. 

SENATORS. 
e figures opposite the members' n rhen their terms expire. 



COUNTIES. 


MEMBERS. 




COUNTIES. 


MEMBERS. 


1844 


1 


John Beall, ■ - 


I84fi 


Harford,- - - 


Otho Scott,* - - 


1 


\. C. Magruder, 


1 8 i J 


Kent, - - - - 




1844 


BaJthnore,- • 


j ,« - - 


L846 


Monti omery, 


ii ici Wilson, - 




Baltimore city, 


William 1 


L846 


■ 


Thomas <■• Pi itt, 


1 ■-' 1 .' 


Calvert, - - - 


John Bei kett,- • 


L842 


Qui i 'i A iii'"',-. 


John Palmer, - - 




Caroline, - - 


Jame9 Turner, - 


1842 


1 . 


A lex. Do 


184 




\V. P. '■! 


1 .-• li 


St. Marj 'a, - 


Kiel ml Thomas, 


1844 


Cecil, - - - - 


G< o. 0. Howard, 


l ■ Ki 


t, - - - 


n ii holas Martin,* 




Charles, 


\ hex. Matthl \v.,* 


1842 


^ton, 


John Newcomer, 




Dorchester, - 


W.I .Go] 


L844 


\\ orcesti r. - 




! r |. 


Frederick,- - 

w 


aichard r 


I - 1 1 




- - - IS 





iii. i e marked thus (*) are Anti- Administration, - - 'j 

Note. The t I Senatorial election, under the ami Co tion, will 

first \\'.'iliirsil.i\ iii iii tobei next, atwhich tin;. 
be elect i ties, viz. Lnne Lrundel, Calvert, Caro 

[ine, Charles, Montgomery, Prince George's as 5 



HOU 

ALLEGHANY CO. 

William V. Buskirk * 
John M. Buchanan,* 
Will..-, .a Shaw. 

VDEL. 
Jan .v Owens,* 
Tristram S. !>■■• 
.ii.lui s. Sellman,* 
Edward Hammond.* 

tNN 1 POLIS CITY. 
John Johnson. 

BALTIMORE CITY. 
John C. Legrand,* 
Benjamin C. Presstman,* 
Fram is Gallagher, 
John J. Graves, : 
William M.Starr.* 

i; LLTIMORE CO. 
Joseph Walker, 
Thomas C. Riste 
Philip Poultney,* 
Marcus R. Hook,* 
J. Ii. W. Randall. • 
C \l.\ ERT COUNTY. 
Uriah Laveille, 
i)nke, 

'1, jr. 
CAROLINE COUNTY. 
Jul,., Nichols, 
Jam'l Culbretb, 
William ii. Dowi . 
CARROLL COUNTY. 
Jar, iii Powd 
John B. B, 

narked thus (*) 
istration, 

Independent, - 



5E OF DELEGATES. 
Daniel Stull,* 
Francis F. TJ 

CECIL COUNTY. 
William Knight,* 
John Owi 

I . Forward.* 
(II LRLES COUNTY 
.John Matthews, 

!'.!'• 'lit. 

Peter M. ('ran.'. 

DORCHESTER CO. 



N ichols, 
' K. Traverse, 
hardson, 
J. K. E( 

FREDERICK CO. 
J. H. Simmons,* 

-talej-,* 
JohnW. Geyer,* 
Daniel S. I 

>, Hey.* 
HARFORD COUNTY. 
Sutton,* 

I I,...,: i ! Hope,* 

Henry H. Johns,* 
Charles D. Boulden.* 
KENT COUNTY. 
Rasin M. I 
James H. Gale, 
Samuel M. Sutton. 

MONTGOMERY CO. 
John M. Darby, 
I rittings, 
Vdminiatration, 



John I'.raddock.jr. 
John C. Gott. 
PR'CE GEORGE'S CO 
J. M. s. M 
Samuel Hamilton, 
William H. Tuck, 
John H. Bayne. 
O.UEEN ANNE'S CO. 
K. B. Carmichael,* 
Valentine Briar.,* 
(One tie.) 

ST. MARY'S COUNTY 
J. M. s. Causin, 
James D. Sutton, 
James R. Hopewell 

SOMERSET CO. 
Joshua R. Handy, 
John I. 1) 
Thomas W. Stone, 
Samuel S. Boggs. 

TALBOT COUNTY. 
William B. Willis,* 
(;,■.•,) ge W. Sherwood,* 
William W. Lowe.* 

WASHINGTON CO. 
Joseph Hollman,* 
Samuel Lyday,* 
Jervis Spencer,* 
Jacob H. Grove.* 

WORCESTER CO. 
Littleton Dennis, 
Levi Cathel, 
Jam, - Powell, 
1 Edwin Forman. 

41 



li: 



64: Executive Government of the United States. 

The 14th Presidential term of four years, since the establishment 
of the Government of the United States under the Constitution, 
began on the 4th of March, 1841 ; and it will expire on the 3d of 
March, 1845. William Henry Harrison, of Ohio, having been 
elected by a majority of 174 of the electoral votes, was, on the 4th 
of March, 1841, inaugurated President of the United States in the 
city of Washington, and died at 12± o'clock, a. m. on the 4th of 
the succeeding April. In consequence of this event the duties of 
the office have devolved on John Tyler, of Virginia, who had been 
elected by the same majority Vice President. 



JOHN TYLER, of Virginia, President of the United States. Salary, 

$25,000 per annum. 

John Tyler, Jr., Private Secretary to the President of the U. 

States. Salary, $1,500 per annum. 

THE CABINET. 

Massachusetts, Secretary of State, $ 6,000 
Pennsylvania, Secretary of Treashj, 6,000 
New York, Secretary of War, 6,000 

Virginia, Secretary of the Navy, 6,000 

Charles A'. Wicklifle, Kentucky, Postmaster General, 6,000 

Hugh S. Legare, South Carolina, attorney General, 4,000 

Iiist of Officers, Clerics, etc. 

Employed in the Public Offices at Washington, with their respective Salaries. 
DEPARTMENT OF STATE. 



Daniel Webster, 
Walter Forward, 
John C. Spencer, 
Abel P. Upshur, 



Chief Clerk. 
F. Webster, $2,000 
Diplomatic Bureau. 
W. S. Derrick, 1,600 
W. Hunter, jr. 1,500 
F. Markoe, jr. 1,400 

Consular Bureau. 
Benj. C. Vail, 14,00 
Robert S. Chew, 14,00 
J. S. Ringgold, 14,00 

Home Bureau. 
T. W. Dickins, 14,00 
Horatio Jones, 1,000 
A. H. Derrick, 
George Hill, 

Librarian 
R. Greenhow, 



9,00 

800 



1,600 



Disbursing Agent. 
Edward Stubbs, 1,658 

PATENT OFFICE. 

Commissioner. 
H.L.Ellsworth, 3,000 

Chief Clerk. 
J. W. Hand, 1,700 

Examiners. 
C. M. Keller, 1,500 
T.W.Donovan, 1,500 
Henrv Stone, 1,250 
W.P.Fitzgerald, 1,250 

Clerks. 
J.H. Titcomb, 1,200 
John J. Roane, 1,000 
W. G. Cranch, 1,000 



Lewis T. Fales, 800 
Thomas Johns, * 
S. S. Webster, * 

Draughtsmen. 
A. L. Mclntire, 1,200 
C. L. Fleiscmann, f 
Geo. Strickland, \ 

Machinist. 
H. Knowles, 1,250 

NATIONAL GALLERY. 

Day Watch. 
R. K. Watts, 600 

*Pay 10 cents per 100 
woids. 

f Pay according to num- 
ber of drawings executed. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



Chief Clerk. 
McC. Young, $2,000 

Clerks. 
S. M. McKean, 1,600 
Richard Ela, 1,600 
C. Dummer, 1,600 
G. Rodman, 1,400 
J.N. Lovejoy, jr. 1,400 



J. McGinnis, jr. 1,400 
J. F. Hartley, 1,400 
W. W. King, 1,400 
W.D.Wilson, 1,450 
C. M. Ingersoll, 1,150 
W. Gulager, 1,000 
Charles Fisher, 1,000 
Samuel Green, 1,000 



First Comptroller. 
J. N. Barker, 3,500 

Chief Clerk. 
James Larned, 1,700 

Clerks. 
L. Washington, 1,400 
N.B.Van Zandt, 1,400 
Wm. Anderson, 1,400 



■TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



CLERK S — 

George Wood, $1,400 
Tims. Ferrari, 1,150 
J. B. North, 1,150 
T.F. Sanderson, 1,150 
R.S.Briscoe, 1,150 
J. R. McCorkle, 1,150 
Wrn. Miller, 1,000 
John Y. Laub, 1,000 
B. F. Rogers, 1,000 
George Johnson, 1,000 
W. C. Benthall, 1,000 

Secorul Comptroller 
A. K. Parris, 3,000 

Chief Clerk. 
J. Seaver, 1,700 

Clerks. 
Jas. M. Cutts, 1,400 
Geo. D. Abbott, 1,400 
J. L. Cathcart, 1,150 
Jos. Manahan, l,150jH. C. Matthews, 1,400 
T. Purrington, 1,150 Henry Randall, 1,400 
J. M. Brodhead, 1,000JS. S. Rind, 1,150 

Wm. A. Evans, 1,000 Gideon Pearce, 1,150 
Charles McGill, 800 " 



65 



L.Maekall, Si, 150 
Peter Brady, 1.150 
O.S.Hall, 1,15(1 

D.E.Dunscomb, 1,150 
J. F. Polk, 1,000 

R. T. '.ueen, 1,000 
William Ford, 1,000 
C. W. Forrest, 1,000 
(One vacancy,) 1,000 
J. W. Brown, 800 

Third Auditor. 
Peter Hagner, 3,000 

Chief Clerk. 
Jas. Thompson, 1,700 

Clerks. 
Charles Vinson, 1,400 
R. Burgess, 1,400 
Thos. Gunton, 1.400 
B. Clements, 1.4)0 



John Sessford, 800 

First Auditor. 
Jesse Miller, 3,000 

Chief Clerk. 
Alex. Mahon, 
Clerks. 
J. Williams, 
Win. Morton, 
Thos. G. Slye, 
J. Underwood, 



1,700 



1,400 
1,400 



Levin Jones, 1 ,150 
John Harry, 1,150 
Anthnnv Hide, 1,150 
Silas H. Hill, 1.150 
D. D. Davidson, 1,150 
W.H.S.Tavlor, 1.150 
S. S. Whiting, 1.150 
J. R. Hagner, 1,150 
John II. Smith, 1,000 
T. R. Hampton, 1,000 
1.150 J. P. VanTvne, 1,000 
1,150 Edward Smith, 1,000 
J.W. Bronaugh, 1,150|B. L. Bo<ran, 1,000 
J. M. Torbert, l,150|james Whine, 1,000 
J.W.Bronaugh, 1,150:T. L. Fitztragn, 1,000 
M.H.Miller, 1,150 Charles Abbott, 800 
John Ferguson, 1,000 



J. M. Ramsev, 1,000 
James Colgate, 1,000 
J. A. Brightwell, 800 

Second Auditor. 
Wm. B. Lewis, 3,000 

Chief C.erk. 
James Eakin, 1 
Clerks. 



B. Goddard, 803 
— Kirkpatrick, 800 

Fourth Auditor. 
O. Davton, 3,000 
Chief Clerk. 



H. Gilliss, 1,700 
Clerks. 

00 Wm. Hunter, 1.400 

| Robert Gettv, 1,400 

John Wells, jr. 1,400; George Gilliss, 1,150 

Samuel Lewis, 1,400 R. T. McGill, 1,150 

R. M. Boyer, 1,150 Geo. M. Head, 1,150 

Wm. Mechlin, 1,150) Hobart Berrian, 1,150 



A. H.Mechlin, $1,150 
.1. B. Sulllivan, 1,000 
Samuel Grubb, 1,000 
J. E. Harvey, 1,000 
J.W. Moorhead, 1,000 
W. H. Topping, 1,000 
R. Mackall, 1,000 

Fifth Auditor. 
S. Pleasanton, 3,000 

Chief Clerk. 
Thos. Mustin, 1,700 

Clerks. 
J. H. Houston, 1,400 
J. D. King, 1,400 

Henry W. Ball, 1,150 
A.Campbell, 1,150 
John Devlin, 1,150 
Robt. Kicketts, 1,150 
Alex. Spear, 1,000 
Ashbel Steele, 1,000 

Auditor for the Post 

Office Department. 
E. Whittlesey, 3,000 

Chief Clerk. 
P.GWashington,2,000 

Principal Clerk's. 
John Suter, 1,600 

Wm. G. Eliot, 1,600 
David Saunders,l,600 
Richard Dement, 1,600 

Clerks. 
\ T . Tastet, 1,400 

J. F. Caldwell, 1,400 
S. Fitzhugh, 1,400 
W.C.Lipscomb, 1,400 
P. Simpson, 1,400 
John F. Boone, 1,400 
T. A. Scott, 1,400 
J.M.Duncanson, 1,400 
A.G.Meriwether 1,400 
Jas. Coolidse, 1,400 
L. J.Middleton, 1,400 
P.Wheeler, 1,400 
David Koones, 1,200 
W.J. Bronaugh, 1,200 
Wm. Ingle, 1,200 
Jos. Revnolds, 1,200 
P. Washington, 1,200 
John Evans, 1,200 
Joseph Carter, 1,200 
R. S. Wharton, 1,200 
John Thaw, 1.200 



66 

Giles Dyer, $1,230 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



S. A. Houston, 
George Dale, 
G. D. Hanson, 
Lewis Welsh, 
Win. S. Darrel 
J. M. Hanson, 
F. W. Smith, 
Jas. D. Seavy, 
Jos. Quicksall, 

D. Howard, 
S. McPherson, 
I. H. Bobbins, 
Jacob II. Wiiugli, 1,200 
J. B. B.Wilson, 1,200 
John West, 1,200 
Geo.W.Mountz, 1,200 
Andrew Coyle, 1,200 
Chas. Monroe, 
Joseph Harris, 
T. B. Hopkins, 
J. H. Durham, 
L. J. Anderson 
Nahum Stone, 
S. Harkness, 
James Caden, 
Samuel Dexter 
Levi H. Parish 
Wills De Hass, 1,000 
T. B. Quimby, 1,000 
David Lambert, 1,000 
Bobert Dyer, 1,000 
J.W.Bronaugh, 1,000 

E. W. Fortney, 1,000 
Bernard Wiley, 1,000 



1,2011 
1,200 
1,2,10 
1,200 
1,200 
1,230 
1,200 
1 ,200 
1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
1,200 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1.000 



1,000 

1 ,000 
1.000 



J. F. Sharreti , 

J. MeKenncy, 

A. II. Harper, 

J. C. Kennedy, 1,000 

N. L. Wilson, 1,000 

Jos. C. Lewis 

John McLeod 

.C, F. Pope, 



1.1)0(1 

1,000 
1,000 



Rezktcr. 
T. L. Smith, 3,000 

Chief Clerk. 
M. Nourse, 1,700 

Clerks. 
James McClery, 1,400 
J. D. Barclay, 1,400 
John B. Blake, 1,400 
Wm. James, 1,400 
James Laurie, 1,150 



F. Lowndes, $1,150 
J. W.Williams, 1,150 
Joseph Mountz, 1,000 
J. K. Hanson, 1,000 
J. D. Woodside, 1,000 



John Nourse, 

It. Lawrence, 

E. Patterson, 

II. Brewer, 

G. W. Barry, 

Geo. G. Cox, 

L.G.VanKleck, 1,000 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



P. W. Gallaudet, 
J. G. Berret, 
Z. C. Perry, 



Treasurer. 
Wm. Selden, 3,000 

Chief Clerk. 
W.B.BandoIph, 1,700 

Clerks. 
II. Jackson, 1,400 
Jonathan Guest, 1,400 
Wm. D. Nutt, 1,200 
II. Lightner, 1,200 
Wm. II. West, 1,200 
S. M. Bootes, 1,200 
Andrew Smith, 1,130 
II. Brookes, 1,000 
Wm. B. Page, 1,000 
T. B. Dashiell, 1,000 

Solicitor. 
C. B. Penrose, 3,500 

Clerks. 
N. Harpur, 1,150 

B. F. - 
Dasil Waring, ' 1,150 

GEN. LAND OFFICE. 
Commissioner. 

E.M.Huntington 3,000 
Solicitor. 

Chas. Hopkins, 2,000 
Recorder. 

J. Williamson, 2,000 

Principal Clerk Pub- 
lic Lands. 

J. M. Moore, 1,800 

Principal CPk Private 
Lands. 

J. S. Wilson, 1,800 

Princ. Clerk Surreys. 

W. T. Steiger, 1,800 



Clerks. 

C. S. Frailey, 
W. Simmons, 
M.Fitzhugh, 
N. A. Randall, 



,•1 ,500 
'1,400 
1,400 
1,400 



G.W.Ganibloss, 1,400 



Wm. Wood, 
J. Nollner, 

B. T. Beilly, 
E. Coolidge, 
E. Barnard, 
J. Y. Bryant, 
W. O. Slade, 
J. Addison, 
D. F. Heaton, 
Wm. French, 
Benj. Evens, 
M. Willet, 
J. B. Tagart, 
I. C. Smith, 
O. S. Paine, 
W. T. Brooke, 
G. C. Whiting, 

C. Fletcher, 
W. M. Haxtun 
S.M. Wolfe, 
L. G. Gassaway, 1J200 
Wm. Henry, 1,200 
H. Hungerford, 1,200 
A. B. Kelly, 1,200 
G. W. Wilson, 1,200 
P. II. Sweet, 1,200 
W. H. Deitz, 1,200 
J. L. Barnhill, 1,200 
J.H.Waggaman,l,200 
Wm. Nourse, 1,200 



1,300 
1,300 
1,300 
1,300 
1,300 
1,300 
1,300 
1 ,300 
1,300 
1.300 
1,300 
1,300 
1,300 
1,300 
1,300 
1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
1,200 



Pleasants, 1 ,150' J. M. Slade, 1,200 
" n! R.H. Williamson 1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
1,100 
1,100 
1,100 



C. A. Davis 
J. H. Blake,' 

A. B. Dowson 
J. P. Wingerd 

B. Bennett, 
F.A.Tschiffely,l,100 
Wm. Hicks, 1,000 
B. I . Morsell, 1,000 
O. H. Bestor, 1.000 
L. P. Davis, 1,000 
A.H.Lawrence, 1,000 
J.W.De Krafft, 1,000 
W.H. Watson, 1,000 
W.V.H. Brown, 1,000 



J. N. Ashton, 
Geo. Taylor, 



1,000 
1,000 



CLERKS 



R D E P A R T M t: N T . 



07 



Pf.P.Causin, $1,000 
John Hood, 1,000 
J.L.Cathcart,jr. 1,000 
A. S. H. White, 1,000 
E. M. Evans, 1,000 
J. J. Randolph, 1^000 



P. C.Goode, $1,000 
Peter Wilson, 1,000 
3. Holmes, 1,000 
J. If. Hager, 1,000 
U. McLaughlin, 1,000 
D.S.Todd, 1,000 



G.Waterhouse,$l,000 
Win. Clyde, 1,000 
J. J. Sperry, 1,000 

Draughtsmen. 
E. Gilman. 1,500 

H. G. O'Ncalc, 1,200 



WAR DEPARTMENT. 



Chief Cleric. 
D. Parker, $2,000 

Clerks. 
J. T. Cochrane, 1,600 
J. II. OrHlev, 1.400 
Nathan Rice, l',400 
('.Calvert 1,400 

If. II. Kreba, 1,901 
John Potts, 1,000 

J.D.McPhcrson,l,000 

INDIAN DKPARTT. 

Commissioner. 

T. II. Crawford, 3,000 

Chief Clerk. 



1,600 

1,600 
1,600 
1,400 

1 ,400 



D. Kurtz, 

Clerks 
C. E. Mix, 
II. Miller, 
S. . Potts, 
T. Waugh, 
T.R.Cruttenden,l,400 
B. II. Waring, 1,400 
L. II. Bern man, 1,000 
W.Devereaux, 1,000 
\V. B. Waugh, 1,000 
II. S. Addison, 1,000 
Frank Stanley, 1,000 

BOUNTY LAND OFFICE. 

Clerks. 
Wm. Gordon, 1,600 

E. Stephens, 1,000 

PENSION OFFICE. 

Commissioner. 
J. L. Edwards, 2,500 

Chief Clerk. 
G. W. Crump, 1,600 

Clerks. 
W. S. Allison, 1,400 
II. II. Sylvester, 1,400 
John D.Wilson, 1,40( 



P. S. Evans, ,<*1,200 
Wm. W. Tyler, 1,200 
W. M. Steuart, 1,000 
Daniel Brown, 1,000 
W. II. Fairs, 800 

I). I). Addison, 800 
T. L. Moody, 800 



Major General com- 
manding the Jlrmy. 
Winfield Scott. 

Clerk. 
E. Brewer, 1,000 



W. J. Smith, $1,200 
C.G.Wilcox, 1,000 
C. Munroe, 1,000 

Paymaster General. 
N. Towson, 2,500 

Chief Clerk. 
N. Frye, 1,700 

Clerks. 
Wm. D. Beall, 1,400 
W. W. Billing, 1,150 
('. Whitman, 1,150 
E. II. Brooke, 1,000 



Surgeon General. 

T. Law son, 2,500 

Clerks. 

1,150 
1,000 



.Adjutant General 
Roger Jones. 
Clerks. 
B.Williams, 1,200 
J. M. Hepburn, 1,150 n - Johnson, 
J. L. Addison, 1,000 A. Balmain. 

J. G. Law, 1,000 

J. H. Lowry, 1,000 Chief Topographical 
A. F. Wilcox. 1,000| Engineer. 

T. M. Hanson, 8,00, John J. Abert. 

Chief Clerk. 

Q. Master General. |G. Thompson, 1,400 



Thomas S. Jessup. 

Chief Clerk. 
W. A. Gordon, 1,600 

Clerks. 
Levin Belt, 1,200 

L. A. Fleury, 1,000 
Wm. L. Bailey, 1,000 
James Gozsler, 1,000 
W.J. Anderson, 1,000 

CLOTHING BUREAU. 

Clerk. 
J. C. Goolrick, 1,000 

Commis'y of Subsists. 
George Gihson. 

Chief Clerk. 
Richard Gott, 1,60( 



C. Tschiffely," 1,000 
J. G. Bruff, 1,000 
Colonel of Ordnance. 
Geo. Bomford. 

Chief Clerk. 
Geo. Bender, 1,200 

Clerks. 
Morris Adler, 1,150 
Samuel Rainey, 1,000 
W. McDermott, 1.000 
JohnW. Butler, 1,000 
W. C. Riddall, 1,000 
J. P. Keller, 1,000 
X. W. Fales, 800 

Militant Storekeeper. 
M. C. Buck, 1,476 



68 CLERKS — NAVY AND POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT. 



Chief rierli. 
John D. Simms, 
Clerks. 
B. M. Vnorhees, 
L. B. Hardin, 
A. T Smith, 
Moses Poor, 
T. Fillebrown, jr. 
Jam.-, CaUaghan, 

W. \V. Russell. 



1.600 
1,401 

1,401 

1,0. /(I 

1,000 
800 



NAVY DEPARTMENT. 
Commissioners of jvavy 

Board. 
L Warrington, §3,500 

Win. M. Crane, 3,500 
David Conner, 3,500 

Secretary. 
C. W. Goldsborongl), 2,00 

Chief Clerk. 
Wm. G. Ridgeley, 1,000 



Clerks. 
John Green, 
James Hutton, 
J. P. McCorkle, 
John. H. Reilly, 
Gustavus Harrison, 
Draughtsman. 
Conrad Schwartz, 



§1,150 
1.000 
1,000 
1,000 
l,00o 

,000 



NAVY YARD, WASHINGTON.— Naval Officers. 



Beverly Kennon Capt. Comand't 3.500 

G.J. Pemlergrast, Commander, -2, 100 

E. B. Boutwell. Lieutenant. 1,500 

Marmaduke Dove, Master, 1,000 

Thomas Barrv, Master, 1,0 10 

G. R. Barry, Purser, 1,080 

Edmund L. Du Barry, Surgeon, 1.500 



George Maulsby, Assist. Surgeon, 
William Ryland, Chaplain, 
\Vill,am Waters, Boatswain, 
D. S. Philips, Boatswain, 
Henry P. Leslie, Carpenter, 
John W. Palmer, Master's Mate, 



Civil Establishment. 



Cary Selden, Navy Storekeeper, 1,700 
F. Rhodes, Naval Constructor, 2,300 
James Tucker. Master Smitli, 1,350 
John Davis. Master Plumber, 1.250 
Jas. Carberry, Timber Inspector, 900 
Richard Barry. Clerk of Yard, 900 

D. McComb, Clerk to Command't, 900 
W. H. Kennon, 2d Cl'k to " 750 



G. Herold, Cl'k to N. Storekeep'r, 750 
F. Barry, sen. Cl'k to M. Builder, 450 
Wm. Hebb, Keeper of Magazine, 480 
Bazil Brown, Porter, 300 

Wm. M. Ellis, Engineer, $3,50 per day. 
J. H. Smoot, M. Joiner, 3,00 " 
A. Woodward, M. Block 'r, 3,00 " 
Philip Inch, M. Painter, 2,50 " 



$2,00( 

1,400 
1,40 
1.400 
1,301 

1,200 
1,200 
1,000 
1 000 

1,0 10 
1 .001 1 



Cliief fieri: 
John Marron, 

Clerks. 
Sanders Irving, 
Samuel B. Beach, 
John Hunter, 
Matthias Ross, 
Robert B. Ru-t, 
Jeremiah Lotbrop, 
Robert Wallace, 
G. M- Kendall, 
W. J. Harden, 
J. G. Sturgeon, 
Special Travelling Ag'ts 

1.600 
,000 

1 ,000 

[ l,(HI 

1.600 
1,600 

CONTRACT OFFICE. 
First Assist't Postmast 

General. 
Selah R. Hobhie, 2,500 

Principal Clerk. 
Wm. H. Dundas, 1,600 

Topographer.* 

Henrv A. Burr, 1,600 

Clerks. 



POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT 

ohn Ferguson, $1,400 

Nathan C. Towle, 1,400 

O. D. T. Leech, 1,400 

lames H. Marr, 1,200 

James Lawrenson, 1,200 

Chester A. Colt, 1,200 

Horatio King, 1,200 

Wm. P. Young, 1,200 

Elijah Hotchkiss, 1,200 

E. H. Metcalf, 1,200 

Le Dnn Brown, 1,200 

John AV. Hollis, 1,000 

Robert J. Powell, 1,000 

lames Allen, 1,000 



George Plitt, 
Edmund T. Bridge, 
James Brown. 
Howard Kennedy, 
C. G. McHatton, 
Edwin Bryant, 



Nicholas Haltf 



\PPOINT'NT OFFICE. 
Second Asuis. V. Gcner'l. 
Philo C. Fuller, 2,500 

Principal Clerk- 



Eben L. Clulds, 
Clerks. 

A. N. Zevely, 
Jacob B. Moore, 
llobert A. Lacey, 
Allen Macrae, 
John Barcroft, 
Josiah Dent, 
M. W. Seely, 
Chauncey Smith, 



INSPECTION OFFICE. 
T'nrtl Assist P. Gelierl. 



1 ,600 

1,400 
1,400 
1,400 
1,200 
1 ,200 



1,400 John S. Skinner, 



Principal Clerk. 
Thos. B. Addison, $1,600 

Clerks. 
David Smith, 1,400 

John Smith, 1,400 

Joseph H. Wheat, 1,200 
George A. Bohrer, 1,200 
James Owen, jr. 1,200 

Henry Johnson, 1,3C0 

W.D.Addison, 1,200 

Lemuel M. Barker 



,000 



WASHINGTON CITY 

POST OFFICE, 

Postmaster. 

William Jones, 2,000 

Assistant Postmaster. 



George Sweeney 
Clerk's. 
Lambert Tree, 
Jas. A. Kennedy, 
Richard Lay, 
Thomas L. Noyes, 
Cornelius Cox, 
Wm. Brook Jones 
Michael Callan, 
Chris'r Lansdale, 
Oscar G. Mix, 

Letter Carriers, etc. 
John George Adams. 200 
John N. Trook, 200 

(Exclusive of their fees 
for carrying letters.) 



1,700 



1,300 
1,300 
1,000 
1,100 
1,200 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



Twenty-Seventh Congress 



<10 



SAMUEL L. SOUTHARD, of N. Jersey, President pro tempore ofiht Senate, 
JOHN WHITE, of Kentucky, Speaker of the House t<f Representative: 

SENATORS AND REPRESENTATIVES. 

The twojirst names, under the head of each State, are Senators. 



MAINE. 
George Evans, 
Rene) Williams, 
El:- in n. Allen, 

David l'.rnnson, 
Nathan Clifford, 
\\ 1,1. Pitt Fessenden, 
Nathaniel S. Littlefield, 
Joshua A. Lowell, 
Alfred Marshall, 
Benjamin Randall. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Franklin Pierce, 

Le\ , W Ibury, 

Charles G. Atherton, 
Edmund Burke, 
Ira A. Eastman, 
John K. Reding. 
Trktam Shaw. 

VERMONT. 

Samuel Prentiss, 
Samuel S. Phelps, 
Horace Everett, 
Hilaml Hall, 
John Mattocks, 
William SI 
Augustus Young. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 
Isaac C. Bates, 
Rufus Choate, 
John Qumcy Adams, 
Osmyn Baker, 
Nathaniel B. Borden, 
George N. Briggs, 
Barker Burnell, 
>VilIiam B. Calhoun, 
Caleb Cuebing, 
William S. Hastings, 
Charles Hudson, 
William Parmenter, 
Leverett Saltonstall, 
U. C. Winthrop. 

RHODE ISLAND. 
Nathan F. Dixon, 
J. F. Simmons, 
Robert B. Cranston, 
Joseph L. Tillinghast. 

CONNECTICUT. 
Jabez W. Huntington, 
Perry Smith, 
William W. Boardman, 
John H. Brockway, 
Thomas B. Osborne, 
Truman Smith, 
Joseph Trumbull. 
Thomas W. Williams. 

NEW YORK. 
Nathaniel P. Tallmadge, 
Silas Wright, Jr. 



Alfred Babcock, 

I). Barnard, 
Victory Birdseye, 
Barnard Blair, 
Samuel S. Bowne, 
David P. Brewster, 
Timothy Childs, 
Thomas C. Chittenden, 
John C. (lark, 
Stalej N. Clarke, 
James <■• Clinton, 
Rii hard I). Davis, 
Andrew W. Doig, 
Joseph Egbert, 
Charles G. Ferris, 
Millard Fdlmore, 
Charles A. Floyd, 
John G. Floyd, 
Lawrence A. Foster, 
Seth M- Gates, 
Samuel Gordon, 
Francis Granger, 
Jacob Houck, Jr. 
Hiram P. Hunt, 
Archibald L. Linn, 
John Maynard, 
Robert McClellan, 
John McKeon, 
Christopher Morgan, 
William M. Oliver, 
Samuel Partridge, 
Lewis Riggs, 
James 1. Roosevelt, 
John Sanford, 
Thomas A. Tomlinson, 
John Van I! 1 r ;,, 
H. Van Rensselaer, 
Aaron Ward, 
Fernando Wood, 
John Young. 

NEW JERSEY. 
Jacob W. Miller, 
Samuel L. Southard, 
John B. Avcrigg, 
William Halted, 
John P. B. Maxwell, 
Joseph F. Randolph, 
Charles C.Stratton, 
Thomas J. Yorke. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 
James Buchanan, 
Daniel Sturgeon, 
Henry W. Beeson, 
Benjamin A. Bidlack, 
Charles Brown, 
Jeremiah Brown, 
James Cooper, 
Davis Dimock, Jr. 
John Edwards, 
Joseph Fornace, 



James Gerry, 
Amos Giurtine, 
Thomas Henry, 
Charles J. IngersoU, 
James Irvin, 
William W. Irvin, 
William Jack, 
Francis James, 
George M. Keim, 
Joseph Lawrence, 
A. G. Marchand, 
Peter Newhard, 
Arnold P.'umer, 
Robert Ramsay, 
Joseph R. Ingersoll, 
William Simonton, 
John Snyder, 
George W. Tolland, 
James Westbrook, 
One Vacancy. 

DELAWARE. 
Richard H. Bayard, 
Thomas Claj ton, 
George B. Rodney. 

MARYLAND. 
John Leeds Kerr, 
William D. Merrick, 
William Cost Johnson, 
Isaac D. Jones, 
John P. Kennedy, 
John T. Mason, 
James A. Pierce, 
Alexander Randall, 
Augustus R. Sollers, 
James W. Williams. 

VIRGINIA. 
William S. Archer, 
William C. Rives, 
William Smith, 
Richard W. Barton, 
John M. Botts, 
George B. Cary, 
Walter Coles, 
Thomas W. Gilmer, 
William L. Goggin, 
W. O. Goode, 
William A. Harris, 
Samuel L. Hays, 
George W. Hopkins, 
Edm. W. Hubard, 
R. M. T. Hunter, 
John W. Jones, 
Francis Mallory, 
Cuthbert Powell, 
Lewis Steenrod, 
Alexander H. H. Stuart, 
George W. Summers, 
John Taliafero, 
Henry A. Wise. 



70 



SENATORS, REPRESENTATIVES, ETC. 



NORTH CAROLINA 

W. A. Graham, 
Willie P. Mangum, 
H. Hwringi >n, 
-,-n w . Caldwell, 

111 R.J. 1 > Llll.l, 

Edmund Deberry, 

James Graham, 
James J. McKay, 
Kenneth Rayner, 
Abraham Rencher, 
R. M. Saunders, 
Augustus H. Sheppard 
Edward .Stanly 



H. Washington, 
i Williams. 



SOUTH CAROLINA 
John C. Calhoun, 
William C. Prest >n, 
Samson H. Butler, 
Wilham Butler, 
P. C. Caldwell, 
John Campbell, 
Isaac E. Holmes, 
Francis W. Pickens, 
R. Barnwell Rhett, 
James Rogers, 
Thomas D. Sumpter. 

GEORGIA. 

Alfred Cuthbert, 
J. McPherson Berrien, 
Thomas F. Foster, 
Roger L. Gamble, 
R. W. Habersham, 
Thomas Butler King, 
J. A. Meriwether, 
Lott Warren 
Three vacancies. 

ALABAMA. 
Aithur Bagby, 
William R. King, 
Reuben H. Chapman, 
George S. Houston, 
Dixon H. Lewis, 
William W. Payne, 
Benjamin D. Shields. 
MISSISSIPPI. 
J. Henderson, 
R. J. Walker, 



the House, 
S. Burche, Chief Clerk in office', 



William M. Gwinn, 
Jacob Thompson. 

LOUISIANA. 

Alexander Barrow, 
Alexander Mouton, 
John li. Dawson, 
John Moore, 
Kdw. D. White. 

ARKANSAS. 
William S. Fulton, 
A. H. Sevier, 
Edward Cross. 

TENNESSEE. 
Two vacancies. 
Thomas T. Arnold, 
Aaron V. Brown, 
Milton Brown, 
Thomas J. Campbell, 
William B. Campbell, 

Robert L. Caruthers, 
Meredith P. Gentry, 
Cave Johnson, 

Abraham McClellan, 

Hopkins L. Turney, 

Harvey M. Waterson, 

Christ. L. Williams, 

Joseph L. Williams. 
KENTUCKY. 

Henry Clay, 

J. T. Morehead, 

L. W. Andrews, 

I., inn Boyd, 

William O. Butler, 

Garret Davis, 

Willis Green, 

Thomas F. Marshall, 

Bryan Y. Owsley, 

John Pope. 

James C. Sprigg, 

John B. Thompson, 

Philip Triplett, 

Joseph Underwood, 

John White. 

OHIO. 

Benjamin Tappan, 

William Allen, 

S.J. Andrews, 

Benjamin S. Cowan, 

Ezra Dean, 

William Doane, 

Officers of the Senate 
Asbury Dickens, Secretary. $3,000| J. C. Fitzpatrick, 1st Eng'r Cl'k, 1,500 

Lewis H Machen, Chief Clerk, 1,800 Edw'd Dyer, Sergeant at Arms ) . cnn 
William Hickey, -E-wc. Clerk; 1,500 and Doorkeeper, J 1 ' 500 

William Carr, 1st Legisl. Clerk, 1,5001 Robt. Beale, Ass. Doorkeeper, 1,450 

Officers of the House of Representatives. 
Matthew St. C.Clarke, CkrkoJ\ ^ i E . L . Townsend, Serg. at Arms, 
' Jos. Follansbee, Doorkeeper, 
1,800) J. W. McCormick, Postmaster, 
Officers at the Capitol. 

John S. Meehan, Librarian lv500 , Robert Mil , ArcKiteet 

" Noland, Com. Pub. Ludd'gs, 3,000| David M. Wilson, Police Officer 



Joshua R. G id dings, 

Patrick G. Goode, 

John Hastings, 

Samson Mason, 

James Matthews, 

Joshua Mathiot, 

William Med ill. 

Calvary Morris, 

J. Morrow, 

N. G. Pendleton, 

Joseph Ridgeway, 

William Russell, 

Samuel Stokeley, 

George Sweeney, 

John B. Weller. 

MICHIGAN. 
Augustus S. Porter, 
William Woodbridge, 
Jacob M. Howard. 
INDIANA. 
Oliver H.. Smith, 
Albert S. White, 
James H. Cravens, 
Andrew Kenned}', 
Henry S. Lane, 
George H. Promt, 
R. W. Thompson, 
David Wallace, 
Joseph L. White. 

ILLINOIS. 

Samuel McRoberts, 
Richard M. Young, 
Zadock Casey, 
John Reynolds, 
John T. Stuart. 

MISSOURI. 
Thomas H. Benton, 
Lewis F. Linn, 
John C. Edwards, 
John Miller. 

TERRITORIES. 
FLORIDA. 
David Levy, Delegate. 

WISCONSIN. 
Henry Dodge, Delegate 

IOWA. 
A. C. Dodge, Delegate. 



1 ,500 
1 ,51 Ml 
1,500 



Jabez B. Rooker, Clerk, 



2,500 
14,00 



1,250| Jas. Maher, Principal Gardener, 1,250 



Government of Maryland. 71 

Francis Thomas Governor, $4,300 Tb08. Karney. S 



Tims. Wnil.t,;:.l,.vi \ -I 

(i. Mat kubbin, Treas. \V. Shore, 2,500 



attorney General Fee.-. 
.1. S. Gitttngs, Com. of Loans. Fees. 
(..(i. i;,, «rer, Reg.orLand 

l);r. id Kill-, : . - 1 . irian, 1,000 

J. N. Watlins, Adjutant General, 500 



John H. Harris, Treas. E. Shore, 450 

J.T. Durat, I, SI it, <;■,.! ,-i-t, J.I I) i 

J. H. Alexander, Eng'r of Stirvej . 

Officers of the Senate. 
Richard Thomas, President; .J- M. Nicholson, Chief, and Jno. N. Watkins, as 
Blatant Clerk ; Andrew Sliver, Doorkeeper; Samuel Peaco, Mi nger; Rev 
Mr. Winelow, Chaplain. 

Officers of the House of Delegates. 
John C. Legrand, Speaker ; Jas. Nick. Watkins, Chief, and Peter Webb, assist 

ant Clerk; Fisher, Sei int i1 \ Wm. Murdoch, Doorkeeper 

Rev. Mr. Furlong, Chaplain. 



Consuls and Vice Co ns tils. 

Austria Fr. Rodewald, 16 German 

S. D. Walker, 40 South Gay street 

Brazil, G. II. Newi i,Vice< insul, Exchange Placa 

Bremen, A. Schumach r, 11 So tu Chart 

Denmark, Henry G. Jacobsen, 46 South Gay street 

France, George C. Morton, Vice Consul, 36 South Gay street 

Great Britain, . . . J. McTavish, 25 Second street 

Hamburg, Fr. Rodewald, 16 German street 

Mexico Charles T iernan, 9 North Charle 

,, Thomas B. \ d ViceConsul, 6 Commerce street 

Netherlands J. I. Hoogewertt", Gay st, opposite Custom House. 

Norway, F. B. Graf, 38 South Gaj 

Portugal, 1. L. M. Smith, Vice ConsnT, 21 South street 

Prussia, F. L. Brauns, 190 1-2 Baltimore 

War the Pope, .... T. J. Bizouard, George, corner of Pine ; 

rEsquador, . James I. Fisher, 7 Spear's wharf. 

Sardinia Emanuel Valdor,* 61 Centre Market Space. 

Saxony, F. L. Brauns, 190 1-2 Baltimore street 

Spain,. Emanuel Valdor,* 51 Centre Market Space. 

Sweden, F. P.. Graf, 38 South Gay street 

Texas H. H. Williams, Commerce street 

Two Sicilies G. H. Newman, Exchange Place. 

Venezuela, J. F. Strohm, 45 South Gay street 

Wurtemburg, .... Ch. Mayer, first floor of the Exchange. 
* Died on the 29th of last December. 



Agents for Underwriters. 

Thomas B. Adair, for Lloyds, Liverpool and Glasgow, for the Port of Baltimore 

and Custom House district, No. l> Commerce street. 
W. F. Prune & Son, for Bremen, South Gay, near Pratt street 



Resident Commissioners 

To take Acknowledgments of Deeds, Instruments under Seal, and 

Depositions. 
Connecticut, . . . Joseph B. Varnum, Fayette, near Calvert street 
Delaware, . . . Robert A. Dobbin, 2 South Gay street 

Florida, .... James B. Latimer, S. AV. corner Fayette and St. Paul's sts. 
Georgia, .... David Stewart, 20 St. Paul's street 
Louisiana, . . . E. Spencer Miller. 

Massachusetts, . . Charles Gilman, 25 West Faye'te street 
Neiv Hampshire, . Charles Gilman, 25 We>t Fayette street. 
New Jersey, ... J. 15. Varnum, Favette, near Calvert street. 
New York, . . . James B. Latimer. S. W. corner Favette and St. Paul's sts. 

" ... S. Teakle Wnllis. Fayette, "West of St. Paul"3 street 

Pennsylvania, . . Solomon F.tting, Baltimore street 

" . . H. P. Hepburn, Fayette, between Charles & StPaul's sts. 

South Carolina, . Joseph P,. Varnnm, Fayette, near Calvert street 



72 Maryland Election, October, 184.1. 


Counties. Johnson. Thomas 


Counties. Johnson. Thomas. 


Uleghany, . . 1035 . . . 1089 


Harford, . . . 1114 . . . l'OO 


Anne Arundel, . 1106 . 




1304 


Kent 597 .. . 486 


Annapolis, . . 181 . 




112 


Montgomery, . 909 . .- . 730 


Baltimore City, . 6386 . 




7435 


Prince George's, 835 : . . 625 


Baltimore Co. . 1404 • 




2318 


Queen Anne 'a, . 702 .. . 716 


Calveit, . . . 433 . 




353 


Somerset, . . . 1134 . . . 802 


Caroline, . . . 605 . 




551 


St. Mary's, . . 743 . ; : 450 


Carrol] 1444 . 




1018 


Talbot, .... 683 .; . 776 


Cecil 1188 . 




1295 


Washington, . . 2196 . . . 2346 


Charles, . . . 61P . 




430 


Worcester, : . 1284 . . : 698 


Dorchester, . . 1143 : 




816 





Frederick, . . 258.3 . 




2739 


Totals, . : 28,320 28,959 


BALTIMORE CITY, STATE ELECTION, 1841. 


5! 


For Gov. 


Senator. 


House of Delegates. 


W. 


D. 


W. 


D. 


Whigs. 


Democrats. 




e-i 


H 


- 


1— 


W 


03 


ra 


SI 


w 


r-i 


-d 


O 


O 


OS 




1 


c 
g 

6 


}. 


r 




3 


S 1 


§■ 


2L 


5 


1 

3 
p 
a 


5- 
a 


I 




1 . 


403 


410 


40 


40:1 


10! 


403 


403 


in 


tos 


411 


11 1 


HI' 


■IK 


410 


'2 - 


341 


441 


34 


434 


34: 


345 


34: 


34: 


34/ 


351 


•15 


45r 


45: 


453 


3 - 


380 


574 


371 


574 


37> 


378 


377 


371 


371 


57-1 


57 


573 


•'571 


570 


4 - 


606 


453 


fi()4 


457 


60; 


600 


605 


01 K 


604 


■151 


455 


451 


•15 1 


453 


5 - 


472 


585 


46! 


582 


47 


472 


471 


171 


47i 


581 


582 


58? 


57,'- 


580 


6 - 


190 


531 


18> 


533 


19 


101 


18! 


191 


19- 


527 


530 


52' 


52'i 


529 


7 . 


346 


508 


347 


508 


34-1 


345 


342 


34- 


341 


51( 


511 


51 1: 


511 


507 




954 


59fi 


9.37 


514 


94 


94 2 


944 


941 


93! 


507 


511 


503 


503 


502 


9 - 


331 


679 


331 


678 


33: 


332 


332 


331 


32! 


G« 


679 


67f 


079 


080 


10 - 


488 


354 


-I.'." 


3,57 


48! 


4«5 


487 


•1-..' 


184 


35: 


351 


354 


3511 


354 


11 - 


08'J 


5 In 


osr 


519 


69; 


684 


684 


DM 


684 


517 


516 


519 


508 


505 


12 - 


374 


50.' 


373 




38( 


374 


37:- 


372 


372 


58! 


58! 


5:40 


587 


586 


13 - 


499 


03!- 


49f 


6:;? 


50- 


500 


49-1 


491 


491 


63r 


632 


034 


031 


628 


14 - 


313 


642 


309 


646 


313 


308 


309 


308 


30:- 


640 


638 


642 


639 


636 




0330 


7435 


6350 


741)3 


3388 


0:i05 


6353 


i33! 


1)3-1. 


7131 


; 13,1 


7431 


7 401 


7393 


FREDERICK COUNTY, STATE ELECTION, 1841. 


DISTRICTS. 


For Gov. 


For House of Delegates. 


W. 



5 


D. 


3 


Whigs. 


Democrats. 


" 


3 






O 


c 


K 


-11 

3' 
3 



- 


on 

re" 
■-. 


r- 


01 




P 


694 


513 


1m 


3 


~7<V! 


506 


"689 


"694 


7110 


~679 


~689 


Frederick, . . . 


518 


Buckeystown, . 


207 


170 


209 


213 


210 


190 


191 


220 


120 


167 


IDS 


109 


Mtddretown, . . 


287 


402 


293 


289 


ISO 


'295 


274 


402 


3'IM 


4 '3 


401 


397 


Create rstown, . 


241 


231 


242 


237 


244 


243 


235 


228 


229 


2)0 


242 


231 


Emmittsburg, . 


232 


278 


234 


234 


235 


237 


235 


280 


280 


282 


279 


278 


Liberty, .... 


336 


140 


331) 


329 


338 


338 


330 


143 


143 


1 11 


141 


142 


New Market, . 


267 


218 


205 


205 


274 


200 


295 


205 


204 


210 


210 


192 


Hauvers,. . . . 


67 


190 


63 


66 


60 


0) 


00 


192 


191 


19-2 


l'H 


214 


Woodsborough. 


235 


225 


235 


234 


235 


231 


23 1 


220 


2J6 


9,28 


225 


224 


Petersville,. . . 


99 


142 


90 


95 


97 


90 


95 


142 


143 


144 


1 r. 


145 


Jefferson, . . 


104 


84 


in 


103 


1C0 


101 


100 


87 


91 


85 


83 


83 




25K3 


2780 


251 18 


2563 


3600 


2011 


257(1 


2814 


2777 


2302 


2755 


278 6 



SOCIETIES AND INSTITUTIONS, 73 
COMMERCIAL, LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC, IN BALTIMORE. 



The de=ign of the Publisher was to give in formation in regard to every institu- 
tion of any import mce in the city; but owing to the neglect of the officers ol pmi 
of them, he has not been enabled to include them in this volume. He hopes, 
however, to be able to overcome this difficulty, and present in future numbers 

the information desired. The accounts here riven, though not as full a thej 
might have been, if the volume had been of larger size, will not he ah 
without iutere.-t, and furnishes such general informati' n as will enable any one 
to form a correi t idea of each institution, its design and usefulness. He respect- 
fully suggests to sucb officers as desire their .So. let as to he represented in the 
next volume, to send in their accounts before the loth of October. 



I.— B auks i 11 Baltimore. 
Combined Capital paid in, $9,424,198. — Open on business days from 

9 o'clock, A. M. to 3 P. M. 

Bank of Baltimore, 

Cor. of St. Paul's and Baltimore streets ; Capital $1/200,000 : Shares $300 each. 

Disc. Tuesday and Friday,— Dim. June and Dec— Elec. in Dec. 
JAMES H. McCULLOH, President —V. V. JAMISON, Cashier. 
Charles R. Taylor, 1st, and James Hogg, 2d Teller ; Z. Waters, 1st, B. C. Col- 

hoon, 2d, and Samuel H. Bowly, 3d /;></,,/,,■ .• \. M. Carter, Discount 

and Jno. T. Smith, Corresponding Clerk ; Ed. T. Gibson, Runner. 
DIRECTORS. 

Wm. Lorman, Hush Birckhead, Jas. Wil.=on, Leonard .1 ;■-.-.. lb G. Da- 
vies, John Gibson, R.Lemmon, Wm. McKim, J. Cox,. I. 11. McCulloh, John 
Mathews, Henry Hollyday, jr. Richard H. Bayard, Thomaas A.Hays, H. M. 
Steele. 

Chesapeake Bank, 

S. E. Corner of North and Fayette street-. Capital £",00,000. Shares S25 each. 

Disc. Wednesday. — Divi. in January and July. — Elec. in May. 

J. S. GITTWGS, President,—}. PINKNEY, Cashier. 

J. Lownds, Te'lcr; H. Chamberlaiu, Bookkeeper; J. M. Winchester, Discount 

Clerk. DIRK C T O B S . 

J. I. Donaldson. Jacob Heald, William Hooper, 11. Purviance, jr. G. Gordon 
Belt, J. J. Troup, J. S. Gitttng*, Samuel Ready, Hi nry Carroll, J. H. Ehlen, P. 
er, Henry Be tmer, Garret Brown, J. Iffi. Duckett, John Travers, 
H. Rieman, Ed. Griffith, B. II. Richardson, Thos. Hu 

Citizens' Bank, 

No. 162, Baltimore street; Capital 8500,000; Shares $10 each. 

Disc. Mon. and Thurs. eve's. — Divi. July and Jan. — Elec. in Sept. 
WM. REYNOLDS, Pres%— FRANCIS J. DALLAM, Cash'r. 

Th. M. Abbott, Teller; Th. J. Dallam, and B. C. Ashton, Bookkeepers; F. C. 

Cook, Clerk and Runner. DIRECTORS. 

I lc Wunroe, James Harvey, George Baitlett, Joshua Dry den. Jos. Rogers, 
David U. Brown, Josiah Cobb, M. Benzinger, A. A. Hack, T. M Council. 

Commercial and Farmers' Bank, 

S. W. Cor. of Howard and German streets ; Capital $612,426; Shares 020 each. 
Disc. Monday and Thursday, — Divi. April and Oct. — Elec. in May. 

JACOB ALBERT, PresH— GEO. T. DUNBAR, Cash'r. 
Trueman Cross, Jss't Cashier; Wm. R. Burneston, 2d Teller; Lorenzo Dor- 

sev. 1st, and John A. McGreevey, -2d Bookkeeper ; Jacob F. Decker, Viscount 

Clerk; Rob. D. Millholland, jr. Runner. 

DIRECTORS. 

Charles Bohn. Eli Chgett, John Resse, Joseph Taylor, Samuel I. Donaldson, 
James O. Carbon, Richard Pear-e, Charles Fischer. James George, Daniel Hoff- 
man, A. Schumacher, James Power, Thomas Meredith. 



74 BANKS IN BALTIMORE. 

Farmers' and Merchants' Bank, 

Corner of North Calvert st. and Bank Lane ; Capital $500,000 ; Shares $50 each. 

Disc. Monday and Thursday— Divi. April and Oct.— Elcc. in April. 
J. HANSON THOMAS, Pres't,— JOHN LONEY, Caah'r. 

S. A. Kempton, Bookkeeper; W. E. Roaa.IHl.CUrk; J. Dougherty, Runner. 
DIRECTORS. 

N. Brice, Benjamin F. Voss. Elias .Shaw, Daniel B. Banks, James C. Sellman. 
David Stuart, Isaac Reynolds, Wellington Gordon, Hy. Dorsey, of Ed., T. J. 
Flack, Richard Holmes. 

Farmers' and Planters' B a n It , 

No. 17, South street; Capital $1,000.000— $000,000 paid in ; Shares $25 each. 
Vise. Monday and Thursday— Divi. January and July— Elec. July. 

JAMES CHESTON, Pres't,— T. B. RUTTER, Cosh'r. 
John E. Reese, 1st, and Charles Cochran, jr., 2d Teller ; William Palmer, 1st, 
and William P. Smith, 2d Bookkeeper; J. W. Richardson, Dis. Clerk; W. J. 
Goldsborough, Runner. DIRECTORS. 

John Bradford, David Keener, Thomas Whitridge, Wm. Cooke, Thos. Black, 
J. Hooper, jr. B. H. Spalding. Enoch Pratt, Benj. C. Ward, George F. Weld, P. 
Sauerwein, James Pattison, John G. Chapman, Wm. Thompson, J. L. Kerr. 

Franklin Bank, 

North, between Fayette and Baltimore streets; Capital $001,850; Shares $12 # 

Disc. Monday,— Divi. April and October, — Elec. in April. 

JAMES HO WA It D, President,— A. P. GILES, Cashier. 

J. L. Barry, Teller ; W. C. Bordley, Bookkeeper. 
DIRECTORS. 
Joseph Jamison, Thomas K-'lso, John Kelso, James L. Ridgely, John H. 
H.xlges, Thomas Sewell, W. P. Mills, John W. Berry. Isaac Brooks, George 
llogcrs, J. Hiss, jr. J. I. Donaldson, Isaac Ramsay, William Riggin. 

Marine Bank, 

N. E. Corner of Second and Gay streets ; Capital paid in $309,190 ; Shares $30. 

Disc. Thursday,— Divi. April and October,— Elcc. in April. 

J. BIER, President; PHILIP LITTIG, Jr., Cashier. 

G. C. Miller, Teller ; L. E. Smith, 1st, and H. F. Reigart, 2d Bookkeeper; T 

Morgan, jr. Disc. Cl'k. DIRECTORS. 

Wm. A. Tucker, Frederick Shatter, Joel Vickers, James J. Corner, George 
P. "Waters, William H. Conkling, Ezekiel Dorsey, William Kennedy, Samuel 
Kirby, John Cunyngham, Baptist Mezich, Isaac Cannon, H. Wilkins, J. Bier. 

Mechanics' Bank, 

Corner of North Calvert and Fayette sts. ; Capital $566,820; Shares $15 each, 

Disc. Wednesday and Saturday — Div i. May and Nov.— Elec. June. 

J. B. MORRIS, PresHf—3. W. ALLNUTT, Cosh'r. 

DIRECTORS. 

Michael Warner, John Clark, William Heald, Francis Neale, Tho. C.Jenkins, 
Geo. W. Richardson, Herman H. Perry, James Williams B. Deford, Josepl 
White, Henry Pike, James O. Law, Francis Barker.— State Directors, M. S 
Norman, John R. Magruder. 

Merchants' Bank, 

North end of the Exchange, Second St.; Capital $2,000,003; Shares $100 each. 

Disc. Tuesday and Friday,— Divi. Dec. andtJune, — Elec. in May. 
JAMES SWAN, Pres't,— D. SPRIGG, Cash'r. 

William L. Gill, 1st, and Alexander Coulter, 2d Teller; Charles Harrison, jr. 
1st, Isaac Hines, 2d, and Charles R. Coleman, 3d Bookkeeper; Charles Good- 
win, Corresponding, and William W. Watkins Discount Cl'k; Richard Dor- 
sey, jr.. E. M. Lowry, Runners. DIRECTORS. 
George Brown, S. O. Hoffman, F. W. Brune, Robert A. Taylor, Jas. Barroll 

William E. Mayhew. James I. Fisher, G. W. Lurman, A. P. Henderson, W. C 

Shaw, C. A. Sihatl'er, Johns Hopkins. 



BANKS IN BALTIMORE. 75 

"Union Bank of Maryland, 

Corner of X. Charles and Fayette sts. ; Capital $1,846,562 paid ; Shares §75. 

Disc. Monday and Thursday,— Divi. Jan. and July,— Elec. in July. 

JOHN M. GORDON, Pres't,— R. MICKLE, Cash'r. 
George M. Rogers, Paying-, and Robert H. Lowry. Receiving Tetter} P. Gibson, 

Bookkeeper} J. M.ott,Dis. CVk} J.Saumenig, Individual Bookkeeper} J.W. 

Krebs, Runner. DIRECTORS. 

Solomon Etting, Andrew Aldridge, William F. Murdoch, John Q. Hewlett, 
Charles H tward, R. S. Voss,Johrj H. Orndorff, John M. Gordon, Tho. Hillen, 
0. C. Tiflany, John A. Pearce, C. D. Slinglnff, Samuel Gordon, L. Purnell. 

W e s t c r n Bank, 

North Eutaw, near Baltimore street; Capital 9588^50; Shares $525 each. 

Disc. Tuesday and Friday, — Dim. Jan. and July, — Elec. in Feb. 
BAMUEL JONES, Pres'*,— THOS. PHENIX, Cash'r. 

Tho. Spicer, jr. Tetter} Jno. .Mason, 1st, and H. C.Morgan, 2d Bookkeeper ; 
VV. 13. Berry, Disc. Cl'k; H. Taylor, Rumu r. 
DIRECTORS. 

Robert Taylor. Francis Burns, Wrri. Harding, Lot Ensy, Jacob Reese, Rob. 
. A. G. Cole, E. P. Barrows, Win. M. Medcaife, Chauncey Brooks, C. 
Tiliauy, Thomas Burchenal, Jacob Baltzell, Fred. Konig. 

Savings Bank of Baltimore, 

First Floor of the Exchange,— Entrance from Gay st. 

Receives and pays Deposites daily, — Election in February. 
JOSEFH GUSHING, Pres'f — A. STIRLING. Treash. 

DIRECTORS. 
Joseph Cushing, Samuel I. Donaldson, Jacob Albert, George Decker, John 
Berry, Basil S. Elder, William Graham, Georce Brown, B. C. Howard, Win. 
H aid, Win. C. Shaw, Samuel Jones, jr. J. Todlmnter, Elisfaa X. Browne, Jno. 
ml) .,ii, James Cheston, Thos. W. Hall, Robert Garrett, Joseph "W. Patterson, 
\. F. Henderson. Francis Burns, John Dusbane, Matthew Smith, William H. 
Conklin, F.W. Brune. 

Pell's Point Savings Institution, 

No. 14. Thames strec t. Fell's Point.) 

Disc. Tuesday and Friday,— Divi. Feb. and Aus-— Elec. in May. 
JAMES FRAZIER, Prcsl — FRED. S. LITTIG, Treas'r. 

DIRECTORS. 
George At. Spreckelsen, John Glass, Joseph Golibart. William Gray, Geo. 
Smith, John Welsh, John A. Rolb, J. C'ooney, James Slater, Wm. Gardner. 

Western Franklin Savings Institution, 

Baltimore street, Basement of the Eutaw House. 

Discount Tuesday,— Dividends April and October.— Elec. Annually. 
JOHN ROTHROCK, Prcst — JAMES DIXON, Trcas'r. 

DIRECTORS. 
John Lockerd, J. B. Sumwalt, G. G. McMillan, Sol. H. Phillips, George C. 
Addison, C. Whitemore, Anthony Bonn, George Harman, George Rea, John 
A. Thompson, Jabez M. Gill, James Hance. 

Western Mechanics' Savings Institution, 

Corner of Baltimore and Pearl streets. _ 

Disc. Tuesday,— Divi. February and August,— Elec. in March. 
DAVID CARSON, President,— MAULDEN PERINE, Treasurer. 

DIRECTORS. 

Jacob Israel, Joseph Peregoy, Wm, Kelly, Enoch Burnett, Aaron Hoffman, 
T. S. Weiderman, John Feast, John V. Emich, Richard lounger, Peter Dick- 
erson, William Clemmons. 



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Baltimore Stock Market, January 1, 184:3. 

[Repotted annual ly for Craig's Business Directory.] 

BANKS. Par. Paid STATE AND CITY ISSUES Par. Paid. 

Baltimore, - - - \i()0 223 State of Md., G percent 100 70 



AN K S. 
Baltimore, 
Citizens' 
Chesapeake, 

Commercial and Farm's, 
Farmers' Bank of Md. 
Farmers' and Merchants' 
Farmers' and Planters', - 
Franklin, 
Marine, - 
Mechanics', • 
Merchants', 
Patapsco Bank, - 
Union, - 
Western, - 

RAILWAY SHARES. 

Baltimore and Ohio, 
Baltimore and Susqueh'a, 
Philadelphia, Wil. & Bait 
Washington & Baltimore 
ROAD STOCKS. 

Baltimore and Harford, - 
ck , - 

Reisterstown, 
York, 



Par. 


Paid 


300 


223 


10 


5^7 


25 


17i 


20 


20 


50 


38 


50 


27i 


25 


124 


12 


v. 


90 


oo 


15 


12} 


100 


80 


25 


20 


75 


•is; 


25 


15J 


100 


30 


50 





50 


24 


100 


80 


50 


7 


20 


-H 


20 


5i 


20 


4f 



STATE AND CITY ISSUES 

State of Md., 6 per cent? 

5 per cents. 

■I J per cents. 

3 per cents. 
City of Bait., 6 per cents, 

5 per cents, 
INSURANCE. 
American, 

American Life and Trust, 
Baltimore Life and Trust, 
Baltimore, 
Baltimore File, 
Firemen3' F 
Maryland, 
Merchants' Fire, 
Neptune, 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
Baltimore Shot Tower, 
Baltimore Steam Packet, - 
Gas Light Company, - 
Phcenix Shot Tower, 
Rappahannock, 
Union Manufacturing Co. 
Water Company, 



100 60 
100 52 



100 
106 

100 

100 
50 
50 

300 

6! 

8 
100 
50 
100 

100 

1000 

100 

100 

100 

50 

50 



71 



Custom House. 

Office S. E. Wing of the Exchange building, corner of Exchange Place and 
Gay street. — Open fir business daily from o'clock, A.M. until half -past 2, 

N. F. Williams, Collector; John K. Law. Deputy Collector; T>. S. Carr, Naval 
OJficir; William Pinknev, .Survey r; Wiliiam Dickinson and John Lester, Ap- 
praisers; Jos. R. Snyder, Public Storekeeper; R. D. Milholland, Weigher; 
Leonard Frailey, Guager ; Samuel Spencer, Measurer. 

All the offices, except those of Collector, Deputy Collector and Naval Officer, 
are in the new Public Warehouse, corner of Gay and Lombard streets. 



Board of Trade, 

For the regulation of Commerce — Meet3 monthly and quarterly. James Wfl- 
son, President ; J. Albert, F. W. Brune, J.Howard, Hugh Birckhead, Vice 
Presidents ; Jos. Todhunter, Treasurer ; Samuel T. Thompson, .Secretary. 



Exchange Reading Room. 

This room, together with the Rotunda of the Exchange, and the a-enues lead- 
ing to it, are under the control of an Executive and Sub-Committet, appointed 
by the subscribers. Every subscriber has a vote at the annual election. In ad- 
dition to the current news of the day, promptly procured for the establishment, 
the Rooms are furnished with newspapers and prices current, from all the prin- 
cipal cities and towns in the Union, with many from Europe, South America, 
and India. Arrivals and departures of vessels are daily reported, with detailed 
statements of their cargoes, both foreign and coastwise. Mail bags are placed in 
the room for the principal packets leaving the port for foreign countries. The 
charge for a letter or package to any foreign port is 6 1-4 cents. The apart- 
ments are lighted with gas, and are open, in the summer season, from sun-rise 
until night; in other seasons, until 9 o'clock, P. M. Price of subscription, $10 
per annum. Wm. G. Lyford, Superintendent ; Geo. U. Porter, Assist. Super't. 



78 III — Literary and Scientific Institutions. 

Baltimore Library Company.— Chartered in 1797, for the use 

of the citizens of Baltimore. It contains 12,000 volumes. Room at the co_ 
ner ofHolliday and Fayette streets. Robert Gilmor, president; J. Meredith, 
secretary; Hugh Birckhead, treasurer; R. H. Owen, librarian. 

Maryland Academy of Science and Literature. — Incorpo- 
rated in 1818, fur improvement in science and literature. Rooms N. E. 
corner Fayette and North streets. Meets every Thursday evening. Julius 
T. Ducatel, presi t; J. Green and J. H. Alexander, vice presidents; D. 
Keener, treasurer; J. Hamilton, secretary; R. J. Harlan, librarian. 

Baltimore Lyceum.— Founded 1832, for promoting literary taste 

among young people. Meets Friday evenings in the lecture room of the Uni- 
versalis! church. The exercises are lectures, discussions, recitations, &c. 
Samuel Brady, president; Samuel Barnes, vice president; I. Candler, trea- 
surer; N. Cox, secretary. 

Mercantile Library Association.— This institution was formed 

November 14. 1839. Its object is the promotion of useful knowledge among 
the mercantile community. It has a library of 2,500 volumes, and a reading 
room, at the corner of Baltimore and Holliday streets, open for visiters every 
evening. Forty-four English and American periodicals are regularly received. 
The government of the association is in the hands of active members, who 
are required to he clerks by profession. Number of active members 220, who 
pay $3 per annum. Number of honorary members 130, who pay $5 per annum, 
' and have all the privileges of active members except the right of voting. The 
annual meeting is held on the second Thursday in November. A course of 
popular lectures is annually held before the association. Charles Braden 
baugh, president; Francis Dunnington, vice president; J. H. Spencer, cor 
responding secretary; Charles Ferguson, recording secretary; George M 
Rogers, treasurer. Directors. — J. M. Brown, G. R. W. Allnutt, George 
Clirfe, R. H. Lowry, J. T. England, N. H. Stevens, J. S. Waters. 

Apprentices Library Association. — Formed for the benefit of 

apprentices and minors, June 30, 18-10. Number of volumes 250. Number 
of readers 700. The library room is over the Patapsco engine bouse, corner 
of North and Fayette streets. Open Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. 
Members pay $1 per annum, and have the privilege of recommending boys to 
the library. John W. Woods, president; A. B. Mathiot, vice president; R. 
Connolly, secretary ; S. Childs, treasurer. 

German Society of Maryland. — Formed October 6, 1840, of the 

descendants of Germans. Meets for social and literary enjoyments on Tues- 
day and Saturday nights, at the room over No. 40 North Howard street. Has 
a library of German and English books. Members 11 5. Albert Schumacher, 
president; Charles G. Boehm, Charles F. Mayer, F. W. Brune, and Gustav 
Lurman, vice presidents; Benjamin I. Cohen, treasurer; Charles W. Lentz, 
secretary; F. W. Brune, jr., and W. F. Frick, counsellors; Messrs. Albers 
and Schuerman, physicians. 
Mechanics Lyceum. — Established for the improvement of the 

minds of mechanics, April 9, 1839. Meets every Monday evening in the 
school room of St. Peter's church, corner of Sharp and German streets, en- 
trance on German street. The exercises are lectures, debates, &c. A course 
of lectures is delivered annually before the institution, by popular lecturers, 
upon subjects of general interest. P. J. Costolay, president; John S. Hagy, 
vice president; Thomas Wilkes, recording, and John L. Reese, correspond- 
ing secretary ; John W. Bond, treasurer, 

Patrick Henry Lyceum. — Instituted, 21st Dec., 1839. Meets 

every Monday night in the lecture room of Mr. Hamner's church, Hanover 
street Its object is, moral and mental improvement. The exercises consist 
of lectures, debates, &c. T. W. Pottenger, president ; John McElderry, vice 
president; William J. Barney, recording, and C. S. Carter, corresponding 
secretary; N. F. Brown, treasurer. 

First Baltimore Library and Reading Room. — Organized in 

the First Baltimore Hose Company, in 1841. Reading Room in Sharp street, 
opposite St. Peter's lecture room. Samuel Harris, jr. president; William H. 
Hickman, vice president; H. King, secretary, R. Turner, treasurer. 



LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS. 79 



Library Association of the Mechanical Fire Company. — 

Instituted 1839. Incorporated 1840. Object, to furnish a library, newspapers 
and lectures to the company. H. Davey Evans, president j T. M. Locke, vice 
president; Solomon E. Cohen, secretary ; Israel Cohen, treasurer; Laurence 
Dolan, librarian. 

Maryland Lyceum.— Formed July 4, 1840.— Meets every Satur- 
day evening in the lecture room of St. John's church, Liberty street. Public 
meetings on the third Thursday in each month. Edward Winser, president; 
11. H. Hall, vice president; S. R. Cox, recording, and D. V. Hammond, cor- 
responding secretary ; J. F. I. Harlan, treasurer. 

Franklin Lyceum. — Thus society was first Organized, as a Library 

Association, in 1837. In 1835 it was united with the " Maryland Lyceum of 
Natural History" under its present title. It w.is incorporated by the Maryland 
Legislature in 1838. The meetings are held in the Wesleyan Sabbath School 
room, Bond street. Object, the improvement of the mind in every branch of 
useful knowledge. The Lyceum has a library of several hundred volumes, 
philosophical apparatus, a cabinet of minerals and a number of specimens 
of natural history. 0. L. L. Leary, president; George Little, 1st, and Jas. 
Grieves, 2d vice president; I). King, corresponding, and A. B. Chamberlain, 
recording secretary ; L. Audoun, treasurer. 
Madison Lyceum. — Formed for the dissemination of useful know- 
ledge, December 31, 1840. Has a library of 150 volumes. Thirty active mem- 
bers. Holds meetings Wednesday and Saturday evenings, in Bazaar Hall, 
Harrison street. W. Hopper, president ; Thos. \V. Campbell, vice president; 
John J. Mills, recording, and C. A. Mettee, corresponding secretary; E. S. 
Milbourne, librarian. 

Howard Debating Association. — Object, to hold discussions 

upon such subjects as are calculated to improve the mind, and promote useful 
knowledge. Formed May 14, 1840. Meets in the room, over the second door 
from North, in Baltimore st. Has a library. John I. Barnes, president ; Jas. 
Rodgers. vice president; N. Gault, treasurer; J. Caldwell, recording, and 
James Hatch, corresponding secretary. 

Young Men's Social Literary Society. — Formed April, 1841. 

Its objects are to improve the mind and promote useful knowledge. The ex- 
ercises consist of lectures, discussions, recitations and dialogues. Has a library 
of 300 volumes. Meets in Literary Hall, South street, every Monday evening. 
Joseph Adams, president; George Dunning, vice president; J. W. Peregoy, 
secretary ; John Carter, treasurer ; W. H. Moore, librarian. 

Henry Clay Lyceum. — Meets weekly, for the diffusion of useful 

and entertaining knowledge. E. L. Melbourne, president; W. E. B. Stans- 
bury, vice president; John C. Gobright, secretary; C Bryarly, treasurer. 

Harmonic Society. — An association, formed in 1840, for the im- 
provement of musical taste and science. Has thirty-six performing, and a 
number of non-performing members. Meets every Saturday evening, from 
October to March, in Musical Hall, under the Assembly Rooms, corner of 
Holliday and Fayette streets. F. Lucas, jr. president ; B. I. Cohen and Geo. 
Frick, vice presidents; B. T. Elder, secretary and treasurer. 

Baltimore College Library Association. — Formed for the 

diffusion of useful knowledge. Has a library of 179 volumes. Meets every 
Friday at 5 o'clock, P. M. in Baltimore College. \V. A. Stewart, vice presi- 
dent; Henry Barrol, secretary; Wm. F. Coale, treasurer ; George Hinkley, 
librarian ; Thomas D. Loney, assistant libiarian. 

Maryland Institute of Education.— Formed March 7, 1841, for 

improvement in the art of teaching. Meets on the tirst and third Saturdays of 
every month. The anniversary is held on the 26th December. Has an annual 
course of popular lectures. Number of members thirty-live. John Prentiss, 
president; C. W. Treadwell, vice president; R. Kemp, recording, and S. 
F. Streeter, corresponding secretary; J. F. Hey, treasurer. 
Scholars Lyceum. — Formed for improvement, in 1838. Meets 

in Eutaw street every Friday. J. D. Fahnestock, president; Wm. Duhamel, 
vice president; G. D. Reese, treasurer ; J. F. Meixsell, secretary. 



80 RELIGIOUS SOCIET1EI 



NSTITUTI ONS. 



Washington Junior Lyceum. — Formed in 1836, for mutual im- 
provement. J no. C. Golmght. president; T C. James, vice president, Geo. 
Thrickeld, recording, and P. P. Eekle, corresponding secretary ; C.GobrigUt, 
treasurer; Edward Cole, librarian. 

Union Lyceum. — Organized 24th September, 1841, for the promo- 
tion of literature. Meets every Friday evening in the rear of Caroline street 
church. Tlios. James, president ; I). M«; Williams, 1st vice president; Charles 
T. Malloy. 2d vice president; E. V. Baker, recording, and P Mi Williams, 
corresponding secretary ; James M. Lewis, treasurer; B. Hardester, librarian. 

William Wirt Society. — Formed 1834. — Object, the improve- 
ment of the mind. Members, 30. H. M. Partridge, president; C. Soran, 
treasurer; S. I. Soper, secretary. 

Irish Repeal Association. — Formed 1841, to promote the cause 

of repeal of the legislative union between Great Britain and Ireland. Mem- 
bers, 700. H.Jenkins, president; M. R. McNulty, Edw. Boyle, Wm. Ward, 
James Fortune, vie? presidents; C. Pendegrast, treasurer ; T.J. Ahern, M. 
Lewis, corresponding, and C. Soran, T. J. Monarty, recording secretaries. 

Monumental Lyceum. Organized August 6. 1838, for moral and 

intellectual improvement. Meets on Wednesday evenings, at the Hall in 
Exeter, near Pitt street. Has a Library of 400 volumes. Members, 80. C. 
Webb, jr., president; A. T. Lewis, vice president; J. W. Loane, treasurer; 
S.T.Simmons, secretary; William Mc Williams, librarian. 

Apprentices Temperance Literary Association. — Formed 

August 10, 1841. To improve the minds and morals of apprentices, and ad- 
vance the cause of temperance among them. Meets Tuesday evenings. Ex- 
ercises, lectures, addresses on temperance and other subjects, recit itions, <fco. 
A. Gault. president ; A. Ray, vice president ; J. H. Barnes, recording, and J. 
Caldwell, corresponding secretary ; C. Taylor, treasurer. 

IV.— Religions Societies and Institutions. 



Roman Catholic Churches. 



St. Patrick's. 

St. John's, (Germ) 



St. James, 



LOCATION. 



Cathedral street, 



Market street, (Fell's Pt.) 
Cor. Saratoga and Park sts. 



Aisquitb street, 



St, Joseph's, - Cor. Howard and Barry sts. 

St. Vincent's, - Front street, 

St. Mary's Chapel, 

Carmelite Chapel, 

Visitation Con vent. 

St. Francis Chapel, 

Protestant Ep 



Pennsylvania avenue, 
Aisfpiith street, 
Cor. Park and Centre sts 
Richmond street, 



MINISTERS. 



St. Paul's, 

St. Peter's, 
Christ Church, 
Do. Mis. Chapel, 
St. Andrew's, 
Cb. of A 
St. Jump 



Jor. Charles and Saratoga, 

"or. Sharp and German sts. 

Cor. Gay and Fayette sts. 

Cor. Eden and Mulliken, 

High street, 

Lexington street. 

Cor. North and Saratoga sts 



(Most Rev. S. Eccleston, D.D. 
2 Rev. C. J. White, Rector, 
( Rev. H. B. Coskery. 
Rev. Jas. Dolau. 

f Very Rev. Alex. Czvit Roviez, 

| O. S. h. Sup. Redempt irists, 
{ Rev. G. Rumpler, O.S.L. 

| Rev. J. Fey, O.S.L. 

{ Rev. B. Bayer, 
Rev. E. Damphoux, D. D. 

( Rev. J. B. Gildea, Pastor. 

} Rev. P. S. Schnl.er. 

Verv Rev. L. R. Deluol, D. D. 

Rev. J. B. Gildea. 

Rev. F. L'homme. 

Rev. J. H. Joubert. 

iscopal. 

( Rev. Wm. E. Wvatt, D.D.foc. 
} Rev. T. J. Wvatt, .■hsist.-.nr. 
Rev. J.P. K. Hensbaw, D.I). Rec. 
( Rev. J. Johns, D.D. Rector, 
I Rev. J. N. McJilton, Assistant. 
Rev. H. S. Keppler, Rector. 
Rev. Fr. Peck, Rector. 
Rev. J. N. McJilton., Rector. 



CHCRCHES AND MINISTERS IN BALTIMORE. 81 




M e t li o cl i s t C lx \i r c li e s . 




NAMES. 


LOCATION. 


MINISTERS. 




Light street, 


Light street, 


Rev. Job Guest. 




Wesley Chapel, 


Cor. Sharp and Barre, 


Rev. J. A. Henning. 




Eutaw, ... 


Eutaw t-treel, 


Rev. G. D. Chenoweth. 




Howard Chapel, 


Howard street, 


1 Rev. R. Emory. 




Columbia, 


Columbia street, 




Exeter, 


Exeter street, 


Rev. D. Steele. 




Monument, 


Monument street, 


( Rev. T. B. Sargent 
) Rev. Thos. SewelL 




Wilk street, 


Wilk street, - 


Rev. G. Morgan. 




Caroline, - 
Strawberry alley, 


Caroline street, 
Strawberry alley, 


> Rev. W. Fretzman. 




Fayetle, 


Fayette street, 


; 




Republican Chapel, - 


Republican street, - 


> Rev. C. B. Tippet. 




Franklin Chapel, 


Franklin street, 


) 




William street, 
Light st. Chapel, 
Whattoat Chapel, - 


William street. 
Light s-treet, 


j Rev. W. Hank. 




Cove street, 


Rev. J. Miller. 




Emory Chapel, 


Biddle street, 


Rev. S. V. Blake. 




Sharp street, 


Sharp street, 






Asbury Chapel, 


Potter street, 






Orchard Chapel, 


Orchard street, 






Prot 


sstant Methodist. 




St. John's, 


Liberty street, 


Rev. Dr. S. K. Jennings. 




Pitt street, 

1 


|Cor. Pitt and Aisquith sts. 

Presbyterian. 


Rev. J. Varderu 




First, .... 


Fayette and North, 


Rev. J. C. Backus, 




Second, .... 


E. Bait, and Lloyd sts. . 


Rev. J. Breckenridge. 




Third, .... 


Eutaw street, 


Rev. G. W. Musgrave, 




Fourth, .... 


West Baltimore street, • 


Rev. G. D. Purviance. 




Fifth, .... 


Hanover street, 


Rev. J. G. Hamner. 




Reformed, 


Fayette street, 


Rev. J. M. Duncan. 




First Colored, - 


Courtland street, 

Baptist. 






First, .... 


Sharp and Lombard, 


Rev. S. P. Hill. 




Second, .... 


Fleet street, (Fell's Point,) 


Rev. Jno. Healey. 




Calvert, • 


Calvert street, 


Rev. G. F. Adams. 




Madison, • 


Madison street, 


Rev. S. W. Goodman. 




First Colored, 


Cor. Thompson & Young, 

Lutheran. 


Moses Claxton. 




English Lutheran, 
Independent English, 


Lexington street, 


Rev. J. G. Morris, D.D. 




Lombard street, 






Trinity Church, (German,) 


Trinity street, 


Rev. Charles Weyl. 




Second German Lutheran, 


Holliday and Saratoga sts. 


Rev. J. P. Haesbaert. 




Ziou, .... 


Gay street, 


Rev. J. Scheib. 




First German Reformed, 


Second street, 


Rev. E. Heiner. 




Second German Reformed, 


Conway street, 


Rev. T. Erbb. 




1 


[iscellane ons 






First Independent, (Unit.) 


Cor. Franklin and Charles, 


Rev. G. W. Burnap. 




Universalist, 


Cor. Calvert and Pleasant, 


Rev. J. Shrigley. 




Seamen's Union Bethel, - 


Philpot street, (Fell's Pt.) 


Rev. Jno. Smith. 




Friends, 


Cor. Pitt and Aisquith sts. 


(No settled Minister.) 




Friends, ... 


Cor. Courtland &. Saratoga. 


(No settled Minister.) 




Friends, 


Lombard, near Howard st. 


(No settled Minister.) 
(No settled Minister.) 




New Jerusalem, 


Cor. Bait, and Exeter sts; 




Disciples, 


North, near Saratoga st. 


Rich, and W. Lemmon. 




Disciples, (seceders,) 


St. Paul's, near Lexington, 


(No settled Minister.) 




Hebrew Congregation, 


Harrison street, 


(No settled Minister.) 




Hebrew Congregation, - 


Cor. Bond and Fleet sts. 


(No settled Minister.) 





88 RELIGIOUS SOCIETIES AND INSTITUTIONS. 

Maryland State Bible Society, was formed in 1833. — Its ob- 
ject is the circulation of the Sacred Scriptures. Place of mee tin g , the De- 
pository, corner of Calvert street and Lovely lane. Hon. R . 15. Magruder, pre- 
sident ; Rev. J. (J. Morris, 1st vice president; Galloway Clieston, 2d vice 
president; Joseph H. Snyder, corresponding, and E. R. Harney, recording se- 
cretary ; C. D. Hincks, treasurer; Rev. J. S. Mitchell, general agent. 

Maryland Sunday School Union. — Formed in the year 1819. 

Object, the formation and support of Sunday schools. Place of meeting, the 
Depository, corner Calvert street and Lovely lane. Geo. W. Norris, presi- 
dent ; W. Woodward and J.N. Brown, vice presidents; J. W. Tilyard, trea- 
surer and corresponding secretary; S. Hunt, recording secretary. 
Catholic Tract Society. — Formed September 1st, 1839, for the 

dissemination of tracts setting forth the doctrines and usages of the Roman 
Catholic Church. Meets monthly, on the first Wednesday in each month. 
Annual meeting on the first Wednesday in January, at St. Vincent of Paul's 
church. Rev. John B. Gildea, president; Jas. Grieves and Frederick Crey, 
vice presidents; Benedict J. Sanders, treasurer; John A. McGreevy and 
John L Gross, recording secretaries; William 1. Barry, corresponding sec'y. 

St. Mary's Theological Seminary. — Situated on Pennsylvania 

avenue near Franklin street. The institution is under the charge of the sul- 
pitians. Very Rev. L. B. Deluol, D D. superior. Rev. J. H. Joubert, Rev. 
l'eter Fredet, Prof, of Theol. and Eccl. Hist. Rev. Francis L'homme, Rev. 
Augustin Verot, assistant Prof. Theol. Number of students, 17. 

Convent of the Visitation of the Blessed Virgin. — Corner 

Park and Centre sts. — consists of 32 members — 19 choir sisters, 4 lay-sisters, 
:5 novices, &c. Connected with the Convent is the Young Ladies Academy of 
the Visitation, a boarding and day school. 

Carmelite Convent — Aisquith street. Present number of Sisters, 

26, including 5 novices. Connected with the institution is the Carmelite Sis- 
ters Academy for the education of young ladies. 

Cathedral Fund Association, — Formed for the purpose of re- 
ducing the debt and completing the Cethedral building. 
Catholic Circulating Library. — Intended forthe benefit of the 

members of the R. C. Church. It is kept at the residence of the Archbishop. 
A person who pays $1 a year is entitled to the use of books according to the 
rules. 
Prayer Book and Homily Society of Maryland. — Instituted, 

A. D. 1818, for the circulation of the Prayer Book and Homilies of the Pro- 
testant Episcopal Church. Right Rev. Win. R. Whittingham, D.D. Bishop 
of Maryland, president ex-oflicio ; Rev. J. P. K. Henshaw, D. D., and Rev. 
J. Johns, D. D., vice presidents ; Edward Ridgeley secretary; Noah Hidge- 
ley, treasurer; D. Brunner, agent. Place of meeting, Protestant Episcopal 
Depository, North Charles street. 
Corporation for the Relief of the Widows and Children 

of deceased Clergymen of the Protestant Episcopal Church. — Incorporated, 
A. D. 1784. Right Rev. Bishop Whittingham, president ex-officio ; Rev. 
Dr. Henshaw, vice president and agent; Rev. T. H. Gilliss, secretary ; Jas. 
Howard, treasurer. 

Missionary Society of the Diocese of Maryland.— Insti- 
tuted, A. D. 182-3. Right Rev. Bishop Whittingham, president ex-officio; Rev. 
W. E. Wyatt, D. D., and Rev. Dr. Henshaw, vice presidents; William G. 
Krebs, recording secretary ; E. Ridgeley, treasurer. 

St. Peter's Free School. — Incorporated A. D. 1805, for the 

gratuitous education of children of both sexes. Rev. J. P. K. Henshaw, 
D. D., president ; William Brundige, secretary; D. Whiteford, treasurer ; 
IX. Kemp, teacher. 

Christ Church Sunday Schools.— Male Department, R. M. 

Hall, superintendent; A. F. Henderson, assistant superintendent; Female 
Department, Mrs. Gittings, superintendent; Infant School Department, Miss 
Young, superintendent. 



RELIGIOUS SOCIETIES AND INSTITUTIONS. 83 



St. Peter's Male Sunday School. — Instituted, A. J). L817; 
William Woodward superintendent ; Thoa. Spicer, assistant snperinti 

St. Peter's Female Sunday School. — Instituted, A. D., 1817. 

Mrs. Jane Barry, supeintendent; Mrs. Mary Norris, assistant superintendent. 

St. Peter's Scholarship and Missionary Association. — [n- 

Btituted, A. D., 1823, for the education of pious and indigent young men 1< «r 
tlie ministry, and for the support of a i 1 1 \ mi -~ii>n:tr\-. Mrs. Rachel Usher, 
1st Directress; Mrs. Mar) Henshaw, 2nd Directress; Mi.-s Lucy Arthur, 
treasuier. 

Missionary A so< (ation of Christ Church.— Formed for the 

support of a y. r i part of the city. Mrs. Harrison, presi- 

dent; Miss Cole, vice president; Missionary, Rev. Mr. McJilton. Meets on 
the first Thursday in every month, at 12 o'clock, noon, at the Asylum, North 
Frederick street. 

Christ Church Asylum. — Chartered in 1841. — Object, the sup- 
port and education of destitute orphan children, -who are taken in at the age 
of five years, and fitted for useful service. There are atpresent 25 little gins 
under the care of a matron and t«-.i-,lr>-r. The institution is situated in North 
Frederick street. It is under the direction of a Board of Managers, which 
ma ts at the Asylum on the first Tuesdaj in every month. Mrs. J. S. Gitttngs, 
president; Mrs. Samu I Wyman, vice pi 

Christ Church Mission Sunday School Society. — Rev. J. N. 
McJilton, president; Upton B Buck, tary ; M • Susan Peachey, 1 

urer. Meets on the first Monday evening of the mouth, at the house of the 
president. 

Ladies Beneficent Society of Ascension Church.— Organized 

1841, for the promotion of missionary and other benevolent purpose-. Mrs. 
Wm. H. Wh'.ttin^li am, president ; M is. I). Whiteford and Mrs. A. B. Murray, 
vice presidents ; Mi Unel iF. Llcock. treasurer ; Miss Ann M- Arnold, sec- 
retary. Meets monthly in the lecture loom of Ascension Church, West 
Lexington 

Missionary Society of N. Baltimore Station, Meth. Ch. — 

Instituted for the promotion of the missionary cause- Sterling Thomas, presi- 
dent ; Lewis Curlett and John 15. Young, vice presidents ; J. Loane, treas'r; 
David Creamer, corresponding, and William Rodgers, recording secretary. 

Western Home Missionary Society. — Formed in 1833, for the 
support of a missionary to visit and preach the gospel among the poorand des- 
titute. Alexander Yearley, president; E. C. Thomas and Thomas Dean, vice 
presidents; K. Younger, treasurer; D. A. McJilton, secretary; Rev. D. 
McJilton, missionary. Meets monthly in Fayette street meeting house. 

Wesleyan Home Missionary Society. — Primary object, to send 

the gnsp.-l to the poor who do not attend any place of worship. S. M. Barry, 
president; K. G. Armstrong and J. F. Hey, vice presidents; I. P. Cook', 
treasurer; J. Farrow and G. W. Corner, secretaries. Meets monthly in the 
conference room, rear of Light street meeting house. 

Baltimore Conference Sunday School Union.— Isaac P. Cook, 
president; J. W. Randolph, Edward Hall, A. V. Cosine, W. H. Mittan, Jno. 
S. Brown, vice presidents; X. McCubbin, treasurer; G. Baughman, corres- 
ponding and K. J. Baker, recording secretary. 

Asbury Sunday School Society. — Instituted 181G. — ReY. Robt. 

Emory, president, G. Baughman, vice president, I. P. Cook, treasurer, John C. 
Keener, secretary, C. Cochran, assistant secretary. 

McKendrean Sunday School Society. — Mrs. Achsah Arm- 
strong, president, Miss E. Morsel), treasurer, Miss Fisher, secretary. 

North Baltimore Sunday School Society. — T. G. Hill, presi- 
dent, S. Hmdes, treasurer, G. Sanders, secretary, Wm. Rodgers, assistant se. 
cretary. 

Hebrew Academical Association. Aaron Hurtz, president, 

A. Weglein, treasurer, R. Goldsmith, secretary. 



84 C II A HIT ABE INSTITUTIONS. 

Whatcoat Station Sunday School Society. — Has two Sun- 
day schools. No. 1, meets in Whatcoat chapel. 116 scholars; No. 2, in Emo 
ry chapel, 124 BCholars. A. V. Cozine, president, \V. G. Young, vice presi 
dent, H. I. Baker, secretary, D. Kalbfus, treasurer. 

Methodist Preachers Aid Society. — For the aid of indigent 

Methodist preachers, their willows and orphans. F. Israel, president, G. Ear- 
nest and Thomas Kelso, vice presidents, James Brundige, treasurer, T. 

Armstrong, secretary. 

Wesleyan Male Sabbath School Society. — T. Dorritee, pre- 
sident, Edw. Hall, vice president, J. N. Muller, treasurer, Lewis Audown, se- 
cretary. 

Wesleyan Female Sabbath School Society.— Miss C. John- 
son, president, Mrs. S. Lawrence, vice president, Mrs. E. Wells, treasurer. 
Fayette Street Station Sabbath School Society. — Formed 

May. 1841. J. H. Keene, president, J. J. Barry, vice president, G. W. Magers, 
secretary, D. A. McJilton, assistant secretary, Joseph Barlow, treasurer. 
William Street Station Missionary Society. Rev. William 

Hank, president, S. Cornelius, vice president, Edw. Heffner, secretary, J. S. 
Brown, treasurer. 

William Street Station Sunday School Society. — S. Cor- 
nelius, president, J. S. Brown, vice president, J. K. Love, secretary, W. 
Williams, treasurer. 

Baptist Association. — Formed for the advancement of true re- 
ligion ia Maryland and the District of Columbia. Geo. F. Adams, modera- 
tor; A. Fuller Crane, clerk ; Wm. Crane, treasurer. 

Baltimore Murray Institute. — Formed April 7, 1841, for the 

discussion of moral and religious questions, and the investigation of the sacred 
scriptures. Meets 1st, 2d and 3d Tuesday evenings in each month, in the 
lecture room of the Universalist church. J. Shrigley, president; Laomi Bur- 
gess, vice president ; Ephraim Lukens, treasurer ; J. L. Camp, secretary. 

Universalist Sabbath School. — William Bayley, superin- 
tendent male department; Shady M. Donaldson, superintendent female de- 
partment. Meets in the lecture room of the Universalist church, corner of 
Pleasant aud Calvert streets. 

First Female Universalist Samaritan Society. Formed in 

1833, to relieve the suffering poor. Members, ninety. S. M. Donaldson, 
president; M. A. W. Mason, secretary. 

Baltimore Conference Missionary Society. — Rev. J. Guest, 

president; G. Earnest, vice president; R. G. Armstrong, treasurer ; C. R. 
Fite, secretary. The Board of Managers meet monthly in the conference 
room, rear of Light street church. 

McKendrean Missionary Society. — Formed May, 1831. Auxi- 
liary to Baltimore Conference Missionary Society. J. M. Lester, president; 
W. R. Howe, vice president; T. E. Armor, corresponding, G. W. Magers, re- 
cording secretary ; I. P. Cook, treasurer. 

V.— Charitable and Beneficial Associations. 

Baltimore Alms House. — Consists of a centre building, and two 

extensive wings, situated about two miles from the city, in the midst of a de- 
lightful and healthy country. Average number of inmates about 600. The 
number in the house, on the 31st of December, was 571. The house is under 
the management of trustees appointed by the Legislature. John King, Wm. 
Dawson, Samuel Rankin, and L. W. Gosnell, trustees for the city. T. E. 
Stansbury, William Crooks, and Isaac Kirk, trustees for the county. W. L. 
Richardson, agent ; Isaac M. Denson, overseer. The office of the trustees is 
at No. 23 N. Frederick street. 
Hebrew Benevolent Society. J. Simpson, president, A. W. 
Dessauere, vice president, H. Franck, treasurer, L. Hertzberg, secretary. 



CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS. S5 

Baltimore State Colonization Society — For colonizing free 
persons of color in Africa. J. H. B Latrobe, president, T. K. Bond, sen., 

C. Howard, P. R. Hoffman, J. H. Briscoe, H. D. Evans, and William 11. 
Stewart, vice- presidents, John r.. Carey, corresponding and William F. 
Giles, recording secretary, 11. Mickle, treasurer. 

Baltimore General Dispensary. — Incorporated 1197, for tlio 

relief of sick persons who cannot afford tlie expense of medicine, and the ad- 
vice of attending; physicians. Office, corner of Liberty and Fayette streets. 
Open even day (ram 8 till 1 o'clock, and from -i o'cloi k till sunset I-ost chil- 
dren are kindly attended to, and provided for, until claimed bj their friends. 
.1 unes Wilson, president, Edward Ridgeley, secretary, Matthew Smith, trea- 
surer. Attending physicians, Drs. Miles L. Donaldson, Edward A. Meares 
and B. It. Hall. 

Baltimore Eastern Dispensary. — Incorporated in 1817 to sup- 
ply the poor with medicine and medical advice free of charge. Office, cor- 
ner of East Baltimore and Canal streets. Gen. Win. McDonald, president, A. 
P. Giles, treasurer, Dion. Downes, M. D., apothecary and resident physician. 

Humane Impartial Society. — Incorporated in 1811 for the bene- 
fit of indigent widows and orphans. To enable them to earn their own living 
by supplying them with work. The store of the institution is in South Gay 
street, four doors from Baltimore street. 

Charitable Marine Society. — Incorporated in 1*96, for the 

benefit of seamen, their widows and orphans. Since its establishment, the 
society has distributed among the families of its deceased members, more than 
thirty-seven thousand dollars, besides the assistance it has afforded living 
members. Captain W. H. Conkling, president, James Frazier, vice presi- 
dent, N. Knight, secretary. J. Corner, treasurer. 

Hibernian Society. — Formed in 1810, for the purpose of afford- 
ing relief to needy Irish emigrants. It was incorporated in 1818. The soci- 
ety, which consists of 175 members, meets quarterly on the first Monday in 
March, June, September and December. The annual meeting is held on St. 
Patrick's day — 17th March. Samuel Moore, president, Jacob G. Davies and 
William Gwynn, vice presidents, Rev. J. Dolan, chaplain, Sam"l I. Donald- 
son, counsellor, John H. O'Donovan and Charles Maguiue, M. D., physicians, 
Thomas B. Adair, treasurer, J. K. Law, secretary. 

Under the direction of this society, is the Oliver Hibernian Free School, 
founded and endowed by the late John Oliver, who was formerly the presi- 
dent of the society. The school, which has accommodations for both sexes, 
is held in the large building ,erected for the purpose, in North street. 

St. Andrew's Society.— Founded in 1806; incorporated 1817, 

for the relief of poor Scotchmen, their widows and orphans. Has 100 mem- 
bers, who pay annual contributions. The sum now invested, for the objects 
of the society, is $7,000. Hon. Alex- Nesbit, president, J. Mason Campbell, 
secretary. 

Manual Labor School.— Formed for the support and education 
of indigent boys. Incorporated in 1840. W. XV. Handy, president, George 
W. Norris, vice president, W. H. Beatty, treasurer, Win P. Stewart, secretary. 

St. Mary's Orphan Asylum and Free School, Franklin street, 

supports 55 orphans, and affords daily instruction to about -200 poor children. 
Attended by 5 Sisters of Charity. Sister Mary Maurice, sister servant. 
St. Vincent's Male Orphan Asylum and Free School, Front st. 
served by 3 Sisters of Chanty, who ha\ e 12 orphans under their care. The 
Free School has about 100 children. Sister Ann Alexis sister servant. 

Catholic Male Free School, Saratoga street. Number of chd- 

dren, about 100. 

Catholic Female Free School, rear St. Patrick's Church, F.P. 

No. of scholars, about 100. There is a school for boys in connexion with this 
6chool. 

Female Mutual Relief Society, for the spiritual and temporal 

aid of its members. Number of members, about 100. 



»b CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS. 

St. James Indigent Sick Society, in connexion with St. James 

congregation, to relieve the wants of the sick and poor. 

Tobias Society, for the decent burial of Roman Catholic colored 

persons. 

Robert Raike's Institute. — Formed 1841, to clothe and educate 

destitute orphan children. Twenty-six boys and twenty -one girls, receive the 
benefits of the institute. John S. Trough, president, C. Suter, vice presi- 
dent, C. Robinson, treasurer, J. F. Meredith, secretary. 

Indigent Relief Society. — Jacob Day, president; J. S. Suter, 

vice president, John V. 1'lummer, secretary, John B. Young, treasurer. 

Seamen's Union Bethel Society. — For imparting religious in- 
struction to seamen. James Wilson, president, Henry Mankin, recording 
secretary, C. Keener, corresponding secretary, Jas. Brundige, treasurer. 

Male Free School of Baltimore. — For the gratuitous instruc- 
tion of indigent children. Thomas Kelso, president, S. M. Barry, treasurer, C. 
R. Fite, secretary. 

Society for the Relief of the Poor. G. Earnest, president, 

J. Brundige, treasurer, T. Armstrong, secretary. 

Poor Society of William srteet Station. — S. Cornelius, 

president, Edw. Henher, vice president, John S. Brown, secretary and treas. 

Neptune Temperance Beneficial Society. — P. B. Lucas, pre- 
sident; W. Cornthwaite, vice president; Robert A. McAllister, secretary; 
J. Wright, treasurer. 

Howard Beneficial Society. — Incorporated 1835. Object, the 

relief of members in case of sickness. Meets 4th Thursday in February, April, 
June, August, October and December, over the Bazaar, in Harrison street. 
120 members, W. J. Williams, president. 

Seamen's Beneficial Society. — Formed May 1, 1841, for the 

benefit of seamen. Members. 60. G. N- Hollins, president ; Jas. Riddle, vice 
presideut; W. Robertson, secretary ; J. Smith, treasurer; T. P. Dill, steward. 

Washington Beneficial Society. — Formed November, 5, 1833. 

Object, to aft'ord relief in sickness, Meets on the 1st Tuesday in each month, 
in the hall of the Liberty engine house. Members, 103. L. G. Shipley, presi- 
dent ; W. H. Hahn.vice president; P. J. Costolay, secretary, E. Ford, treas. 

Western Beneficial Society. — Formed Feb. 6, 1839. Meets 

first Wednesday evening in the month, in the hall of the New Market engine 
house. Members, 80. H. W. Gibson, president; E. Jean, vice president, P. 
J. Costolay, secretary ; J. Baity, treasurer. 

Union Beneficial Society. — Formed 1814. Members 140. J. 

Dryden, president; T. France, vice president; John Helmling, secretary; P. 
Clautice, treasurer. 
St. Joseph's Beneficial Society. — Incorporated in 1841. Mem- 
bers, 100. R. Power, president; J. Flushell, vice president; A. Martin, sec- 
retary ; Edw Boyle, treasurer. 

Jackson Beneficial Society. — Members, 150. J. J. Daneker, 

president; Wm. Armor, vice president; A. Sliver, treasurer ; J.W.Woods, 
secretary. 

Carroll Beneficial Society. — Incorporated 1833. Members, 

100. J. S Suter, president ; S. Hindes, vice president; H. Bayley, treasurer ; 
J. W. Woods, secretary. 

Equitaele Life Insurance Society. — Formed 1841. Members, 
117. David Parr, president; R. B. Yarden, vice president; D. Tool, trea 
surer ; J. W, Woods, secretary. 

Fell's Point Washingxon Beneficial Society. — Incorporated 

1823. Members, 100. W. S. Espy, president; J. S. Beacham, vice president; 
Peter Foy, treasurer ; James Young, secretary. 



MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS. 87 

United Beneficial Society. — LP. Cook, president; A.Piwlall, 

vice president ; A. Sliver, treasurer ; C. Martin, secretary. 

La Fayette Beneficial Society.— Formed 182.3. Members, 54. 

John Brannen, president; M. Meteer, vice president; A. Parks, treasurer ; 
James Young, secret u*y. 

Franklin Beneficial Total Abstinence Society.— Incorpo- 
rated 1840. Members, 44. B. Booz, president ; A. J. Itandolph, vice presi- 
dent; J. Donohue, treasurer ; J. Young, secretary. 

Calvert Beneficial Society.— Instituted 183.") ; incorporated 

is::c. Members, 300. A. G. Hinister, president; L. Holter, vice president ; 
Tlios. Walsh, treasurer; C. Soran, secretary. 

Baltimore Temperance Beneficial Society.— Formed 1839. 
J, W. Bond, president; S. Kramer, vice president; G. "W. Magere, secre- 
tary; \V. K. Howe, treasurer. 

Newington Beneficial Society.— Th. Jenkins, president; John 

Kaufman, vice president; D. Horn, secretary, Alfred Cruther, treasurer. 

Baltimore Friendly Society. — D. Harryman, president; R. B. 

Tardea, 'ice president; 1. P. Cook, treasurer; J. Lowndes, secretary. 

Maryland Temperance Beneficial. — N. L. Wood, president; 

A. C Butler, vice president; E. Loane, treasurer, James Paul, secretary. 

Young Men's Anti-Chewing Tobacco Society. — Formed A. D. 

1841, for the purpose of inducing young men and boys to discontinue the use 
of tobacco. This society was lbunded by the exertions of Henry H. Bur- 
gess, A. M., and others, in the Whatcoat chapel, on Pennsylvania avenue. In 
its incipient state it met with much opposition, but was soon rendered sig- 
nally triumphant in the success it obtained, even over its warmest opponents. 
H. H. Burgess, president, Thomas Sewell, jun., secretary. 

"VI.— Me die al Institutions. 

Maryland Hospital. Located about half a mile from the city, 

on a beautiful and commanding eminence, which overlooks the river and bay. 
Has accommodations for ICO patients. Since 183'j, it has been exclusively 
appropriated to the benefit of the insane. Present inmates, seventy-eight It 
is managed by a board of visiters appointed by the state. K. S. Stewart, M. D.. 
president and consulting physician, William Fisher, M. D., physician and su- 
perintendent ; Mrs. Sarah A. Lewis, matron. 

University of Maryland. — Incorporated 1812. Managed by a 

board of regents, which consist of four faculties of seven members each, ex- 
cept the faculty of physic, which consists at present of rive members. Build- 
ings at the corner of Lombard and Green streets. Faculty nf Ph usic— Na- 
thaniel Potter, M. D., R. W. Hall, M. D., W. E. A. Aiken, M. D., N. R. 
Smith, M. D., and Samuel Chew, M. D. Faculty of Arts and Sciences. — Charles 
Hanson, A. M., A. B. Cleaveland, A. M., Rev. J. G. Morris, D. D., John 
Prentiss, A. M., Horace Morrison, A. M., Edward Hinckley, A. M., and Rev. 
G. W. Burnap, A. M. Faculty nf Theoloey. —Rev. W E Wyatt, D. I)., 
Rev. John Backus, Rev. James Hamner, Rev. G. C. M.Roberts, Rev. Ste- 
phen Hill, and Rev. Benjamin Kurtz, D. D. Faculty of Law, — David Hoff- 
man, L. L. D., Jonathan Meredith, Esq., H. D. Evan's, Esq., C.F.Mayer, 
Esq., G. W. Dobbin, Esq., William W. Hall, Esq. 

Baltimore Infirmary. — Situated on Lombard street, west of 

Green street This institution is in connexion with the University of Mary- 
land. In it there are generally from fifty to sixty patients, attended by the 
Sisters of Charity. 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery.— Formed iu 1840, for 

the improvement of the art of dental surgery. T. E. Bond, sen., president; 
John Fonerden, secretary. Faculty. — H. H. Hayden,'M.D.. professor of den- 
tal phisiology and pathology, Chapin A. Harris, M. D., professor of practical 
dentistry, W. W. Handy, M. D., professor of anatomy and physiology .and T. 
E. Bond, jr., M. D. professor of special pathology and therapeutics. 



88 MISCELLANEOUS INSTITUTIONS. 

Washington University. — Organised 1827; chartered 1832; al- 
lowed university privileges, 1839. Situated on Hampstead Hill. Medical lec- 
tures commence on the first Monday in November, and continue four months. 
Faculty of PhyHc.—Samea H. Miller. M. J)., professor of anatomy ami phi- 
siology, Samuel K. Jennings. M. D., professor of materia medica, William W. 
Handy, M. D. professor of obstetrics. John C. S. Monkur, M. D., professor of 
institutes and practice of medicine, Edw. Foreman, M. D., professor of chem- 
istry, John 11, W. Dunbar. 31. D., professor of surgery and surgical anatomy, 
and W. W, Handy, 31. D., adjunct professor and demonstrator of anatomy. 

Maryland College of Pharmacy.— Incorporated Jan. 1, 1841, 

T. G. JIackenzie, president, G. YV. Andrews and R, H. Coleman, vice pre- 
sidents, William H. Balderston, secretary, H. B. Atkinson, treasurer. 

VII. — Trade Societies. 

Baltimore Typographical Society.— Instituted Novem'r, 1831. 
Object, the preservation of the interests of journeymen printers. 3Ieets in 
Military Hall, last Saturday in each month. 31embers, £00. Joseph Smith, pre- 
sident, A. C. Cook, vice president, J. F. Cook, treasurer, T. D. Sultzer, re- 
cording, and F. Young, corresponding secretary. 

United Mercantile Association. — Organized in 1841, for the 

benefit and improvement of younger clerks, and to supply merchants with 
such clerks as will be likely to do justice to their employers. The association 
has regular literary exercises, consisting of lectures and debates on subjects 
connected with the mercantile profession. A. Parks, president, G. Dunan, 
vice president, D. Fahnestock, secretary, J. A. Servary, treasurer. 

Butchers Association. — Organized in 1840. — Was formed to 

prevent the community from being imposed upon by monopolizers, who as- 
sumed to control the price of beef to suit their own convenience and interests. 
It has triumphed over all opposition, and is now composed of all the respecta- 
ble butchers belonging to the city. 3Ieets on the first Wednesday in every 
month, at 4 o'clock, P. M., over the Bazaar, in Harrison street. C. 31yers, 
president; F. Hoover, treasurer, and 31. Wolf, secretary. 

United Society of Journeymen Cordvvainers — Men's Branch. 

3Ieets for the choice of officers semi annually, on the 3d 3Ionday of Jan. and 
July. Regular meetings for admission of members, &.c. are held on the 3d 
Monday of each month, at J. Laughran's, corner of South and Water streets. 
John F. Armiger, president, John Andrews, vice president, John W. Hender- 
son, secretary, Jesse Beachamp, treasurer. 

Trade and Benevolent Society of Journeymen Tailors. — 

Formed May 10, 1841. 3Ieets first and third Monday evenings in every month, 
corner South and 'Water streets. 31embers, 105. John A. Griffith, president, 
J. G. Fledderman, treasurer, G. A. 31agee, secretary. 

VIII.— Miscellaneous Institutions. 

Green Mount Cemetery. — Situated on the York road, bounded 

by Jenkins' lane and the old York road, on the north; Hoffman street on 
the south ; Knsor streeton the east ; and York avenue on the west. The area 
enclosed comprises sixty-five acres. It is surrounded by a substantial stone 
wall, and entered by a beautiful gateway, from York avenue. The stockholders 
■were incorporated in 1837. The public 31ausoleum, which is of the Egyptian 
order of architecture, is sufficiently large to contain eighty bodies ; it is used 
for the convenience of the lot-hoders. The walks are all shaded with large and 
beautiful trees, and there are numerous vines and flowers planted around the 
mansion house. C. Keener, president; J. H. B.Latrobe, secretary. 

Mount Orange Cemetery. — Situated on the north-eastern boun- 
dary of the city, in a beautifully elevated position, commanding a full view of 
the city and surrounding country. The land has been recently purchased by 
a number of gentlemen who propose to deed it to the lot-holders whenever re 
quired to do so. It is laid out in lots of convenient size, with suitable ave- 
nues for carriages and foot passengers. When a sufficient number of subscri- 
bers shall be obtained, it is the intention of the proprietors to have the Ceme- 
:losed by a permanent wall to be ornamented with a handsome gateway. 



MISCELL 



NSTITUTIONS 



S«) 



Masonic Societies. 



The Grand Lodge of Maryland, was formed by a deputation 

from the several Lodges of Ancient York Masons, in Maryland, which assem- 
bled at Talbot Court House, 17th April, 1787. Meets in the Masonic Hall, in 
St Paul's street, annually, on the third Monday in May. — Semi-annually, on the 
2d Monday in November. The Hall was dedicated November 29, 182-2. B. C. 
Howard, G. Master; C. Gilman, Deputy G. Master, William Denny, Sen. 
G. Warden ; T. Burchenal, Jun. G. Warden ; HL Mackubin, G. Secretary ; 
S. Keerl, G. Treasurer; W. W. Ball, Rev. G. Chaplain ; H. Lusby, G. Tyler. 
There are, at present, fourteen Lodges under the jurisdiction of the Grand 
Lodge. The following belong to the city of Baltimore. 
Concordia Lodge, No. 13. — Meets in the Hall, first and third 

Friday in each month. K. S. Courtney, \V. M. ; Dorsey, S. W. ; Walter 

Ball, J. W. ; II. Mackubin, secretary ; S. Child, treasurer. Members, 26. 

Amicable Lodge, No. 25.— Meets in the Hall, second and fourth 

Monday in each month. T. Mullen, W. M. ; Geo. F. M. Bell, S. W. ; William 
Vernetson, J. W. ; Sam'l Steel, sec. ; John Atkinson, treas. Members, 26. 

St. John's Lodge, No. 34.— Meets in the Hall, first and third 

Wednesday in every month. B. Gell, W. M. ; J. Briant, S. W.; Charles H. 
Lee, J. \V. ; J. Cloud, secretary ; Hugh Devalin, treasurer. Members, 13. 

Cassia Lodge, No, 45.— Meets in the Hall, first and third Mon- 
day in the month. T. W. Hall, W. M. ; H. S. Sanderson, S. W. ; Alexander 
Gaddess, J. W. ; John \V. Smith, sec. ; Samuel Keerl, treas. Members, 29. 

Warren Lodge, No. 51. Meets in the Hall, second and fourth 

Tuesday in the month. Edw. Wright, W. M.; E. Stansbury, S. W. ; S. 
Powell, J. W. ; James Lucas, sec; John Coates, treas. Members, 23. 
King David's Lodge, No. 68.— Meets in the Hall, first and third 

Tuesday in the month. William S. Montgomery, W. M.; William A. Fisher, 
S. \Y. ; Thomas H. Stanford, J. W. ; John D. Miller, secretary; Wm. Bayley, 
treasurer. Members, 42. 

Order of Independent Odd Fellows. 

The Grand Lodge of the United States is composed of dele- 
gates from the Grand Lodge of each State. Each Lodge has one representative 
ior every thousand members. The Grand Lodge meets, annually on the third 
Monday in September, at the Hall, North Gay street, Baltimore. John A. 
Kennedy, of New York, Grandsire ; James L. Ridgeley, of Baltimore, corres- 
ponding secretary. 

R. W. Grand Lodge of Maryland.— Holds annual and quarterly 

communications at the Hall, on the loth January, April, July and October. 
A. E. Warner, M. W. G. Master ; R. Marley, R. W. D. G. Master, p. t. ; John 
A. Thompson, R. W. G. secretary ; John Robinson, R. W. G. treasurer. 

Under the jurisdiction of the R. W. G. Lodge of Maryland, are twenty-eight 
working Lodges. The following belong to the city Baltimore. The officers 
being elected at intervals of three months, it is not deemed advisable to 
insert them. 



NAMES. 



Washington Lodge, No. 1, 
Franklin Lodge, No. 2, 
Columbia Lodge, No. 3, 
William Tell Lodge, No. 
Gratitude Lodge, No. 5, 
Harmony Lodge, No. 6, 
Marion Lodge, No. 8, - 
Jefferson Lodge, No. 9, 
Union Lodge, No. 16, . 



MEETINGS. 



Monday evenings, - 
Thursday evenings, 
Tuesday evenings, 
Tuesday evenings, 
Monday evenings, - 
Wednesday evenings 
Tuesday evenings, 
Thursday evenings, 
Thursday evenings, 



PLACES. 



Hall, North Gay street, 
do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

Hall, Ann street, (F. P.; 



The Lodges of Baltimore have a joint committee on education, which meets 
in the basement of the Hall, on the first and third Saturday of every month. 
The committee superintends the education of about 100 children. 



90 MISCELLANEOUS INSTITUTIONS. 



Order of United Brethren. 

Instituted April 7, 1835. The Grand Band is composed of all the 

members who have taken the third degree.— Meets quarterly. J. Marklin, 

president, J. Taylor, vice president, S. Or. Spise, secretary. 
Washington Band, No. 1.— Meets every Tuesday evening. M. 

R. Hanes, president, J. Taylor, vice president, R. Hopkins, secretary, Wm. 

S. Wilcox, treasurer. 
Franklin Band, No. 2.— Meets every Wednesday evening. S. G. 

Spise, president, J. P. Leppay, vice president, J. W. Carver, secretary, W. 

Konsey, treasurer. 

The Order was formed for beneficial purpose?. Each memher receives $3 
for the first week he may be confined by sickness, and $4 for every succeeding 
week, until his recovery. Forty dollars are appropriated to pay the funeral ex- 
penses of every deceased member, and each member contributes one dollar to 
the widow and orphans of the deceased. Under the superintendence of the 
order is a school fund, for the education of the children of deceased members, 
between the ages of seven and fourteen years. 

Public Schools in Baltimore.* 

The public schools are under the management of a Board of Commissioners, 
appointed annually by the City Council. They are supported by a light tax of 
about three-eighths or one-half cent on the hundred dollars. The system pursu- 
ed in all the schools except the High school, is very slightly monitorial ; the du- 
ties of teaching generally being performed by the principals and assistants. The 
schools have much improved within a few years, and the system, which could 
not be matured at once, has gradually improved until at present it is very suc- 
cessful. The buildings are large and substantially built. The Commissioners 
meet every week at the Depository . corner Calvert street and Lovely lane. \V. 
Krebs, president, C. Gilman, treasurer, J. W. Tilyard, clerk of the Board. 
High School, comer of Lombard and Hanover streets. — The boys 

are taught the classics, higher branches of mathematics, <fec. N. C. Brooks, 
principal, salary $1500; Mr. Crabster, assistant, salary $850. Scholars, 86. 

Grammar School, No. 1, — Corner of Fayette and Greene streets. 

M. Connolly, principal, L. Wilder and Baldwin, assistants. Scholars, 276. 

No. 2,— Corner of Wilk and Market streets, (F.P.) Wm. Gibson, 

principal, J. Murphy, assistant. Scholars, 251. 

No. 3, — Aisquith street. R. Connolly, principal, J. McCroden, as- 
sistant. Number of scholars, 255. 
No. 4, — Corner of Hanover and Barre streets. Jno. H. Falconer, 

principal, Jno. Coulter, assistant. Number of scholars, 195. 

No. 5,— Monument street. T. H. Robinson, principal, B. Charles, 

assistant. Number of scholars, 216. 

No. 6, — Richmond street. E. Y. Reese, principal, Dr. Grammar, 

assistant. Number of scholars, 178. 

Female School No. 1,— Comer of Fayette and Greene streets. 

Miss M. McConkey, principal, Miss Boyd, assistant. Scholars, 153. 

No. 2,— Corner of Wilk and Market streets, (F.P.) Miss MaryMc 

Dermott, principal, Miss M. McDermott, assistant. Number of scholars, 171. 

No. 3, — Corner of Pitt and Front streets. Mrs. Ross, principal, 

Miss Brown, assistant. Number of scholars, 130. 

No. 4,— Corner of Hanover and Barre streets. Mrs. H. King, prin- 
cipal, Miss King, assistant. Number of scholars, 150. 
No. 5, — Monument street. Miss Ann Story, principal, Miss Story, 

assistant. Number of scholars, 160. 

* Principals of Male Schools are paid $1,025 per annum. — Assistants, $625. 
Principals of Female Schools are paid $450 per annnm. — Assistants, $200. 



MISCELLANEOUS INSTITUTIONS. 91 

No. 6, — Richmond street. Miss Godman, principal, Miss Godraan, 

nit. Number of scholars, 130. 
Night Schools arc hold in the same buildings with the day 
schools— under the control of the same teachers. No. 1 has 102 scholars — 2, 
bolan -3, 88 BCholars — I, 10:5 scholars— .">, 71 scholars— 6, 01 scholars. 

W iisliiii^ton Monument. 

This chaste and splendid strui tare ~t ml- in the centre of a square of 200 feet 

. formed by the ol Monument and Charles streets. The 

area around the base of the Monument, enclosed by an iron railing, is about 100 

diameter. The corner sto i the 4th July, 18K5, and the statue 

was placed on the Buramil on the 19th October, L830. The height of the monu- 

ment. from the eminence on which it stands, is 180 feet. Above tide, 280 feet 

Heighl of the statue, 16 feet j weight, 16 tons. Number of steps to the gallery 

surmounting the capital, 220. -Robert Mills, architect. Robert Gilmor, president 

of board of managers j F. Lucas, jr. secretary; James Banol, treasurer. 

Battle Monument, 

Erected in Monument square, under the direction of the city government, to 
the memory of the brw e citizens who fell in defence of the city at the battle of 
North Point and bombardment of Fort McHenry, on the !2th and 13th of Sept. 
L814. The corner stone was hud on the 12th of Sept. 1815. The shaft of the 
monument presents a.J~<> ■ 1 of the Union ; the rods are bound by a 

fillet, on which are inscribed the names of the heroes killed, because by their 
glorious death they strengthened the bands of the union. The fasces is orna- 
mented at the bottom on the north and south fronts with Bass-relievos, one repre- 
senting tlr battle of North Point and death of General Ross; the other, the 
bombardment of Fori McHenry. On the fronts, east and west, are Lachrymal 
urns, emblems of regret and tears. On the top are two wreaths, one of laurel, 
expressive of glory ; the other of cypress, expressive of mourning. Each cen- 
tre of the Egyptian cornice is adorned with a winged globe; the globe repre- 
sents eternity, the wings, time, which flies. The edifice is entirely of marble, 
Surmounted bj R colotsal statue, representing the city of Baltimore. The head 
of the figure wears a mural crown, emblematic of cities. In one hand is a rud- 
der, emblem of navigation; in the other she raises a crown of laurel as 6he 
looks towarjs the field of battle. At her feet are an eagle of the U. S. and a 
bomb, in memory of the bombardment. The monument is enclosed with an 
iron railing, outside of which are chains fastened to marble cannons. The height, 
without the statue, is 42 feet 8 inches — the statue, 9 feet 6 inches — total height, 
6-2 feet 9 inches above the platform. The drawings were presented to the city by 
31. Godefroy, Esq. The sculpture was executed by Signor Antonio Capellano. 

Baltimore City and County Jail. 

The Jail is situated on the eastern bank of Jones' Falls, about half a mile from 
lire of the city. It is built of brick, and is surrounded by a strong Btone 
wall. Number of prisoners on the 1st of January, 1842, 88. Of whom were 
debtors, 9; criminals, males, 45; females, 15; confined for assault and battery 
and on peace warrants, 19. James Disney, warden ; Thos. O. Sollers, clerk ; 
John D. Nicoll, gatekeeper; Jas. Pamphileon, William Dames, George Fogle- 
man, deputy wardens. 

Maryland Penitentiary. 

The Penitentiary is situated on Madison street, east of Jones' Falls, separat- 
ed from the jail-yard by a stone wall. The buildings are of biick, and consist of 
a keeper's bouse in the centre, with wings, in which are the cells for the con- 
finement of the prisoners. In the rear are numerous workshops. The buildings 
are surrounded by stone walls, strong and high, upon the tops of which are walks 
for the watchmen, with balustrades on both sides, to allow them to walk in safety, 
and small houses to screen them from the weather. The report of the directors 
for 1841, states that the number of prisoners has gradually diminished since 1836 
—so that in the year L841, there were eighty -nine less than in 1836. The ave- 
rage profit earned by the labor of each prisoner is $53.48, beyond the expense 
of their mainti-nanrr. Number of prisoners on the 30th November, 306. J. G. 
Davies, H. W. Baxley, M. W. Jenkins, 11. Howard, H. R. Lauderman, and L. 
W. Gosnell, directors. William Houlton, warden; James McEvoy, clerk. 



\>>Z MISCELLANEOUS INSTITUTIONS. 

United States Navy— Baltimore Station. 

Henry E. Ballard, Commandant. 
John A. Davis, Lieutenant 
George S. Sproston, Surgeon. 

Naval Rendezvous — (Ivwer end of Bond street.) 
H. B. Sawyer, Commander. I Henry S. Coulter, Surgeon. 

Thompson D. Shaw, Lieutenant. Hunn Gansevoort, Passed Midshipman. 

A. G. Slaughter, Lieutenant 

U. S. Brig Pioneer, (Receiving Vessel.)— Off Waters' Wharf F. P. 
Zach. F. Johnson, Lieut. Commanding. I Daniel B. Ridgely, Lieutenant 
Robert F. Pinkney, Lieutenant | W. \V. Bassett, Midshipman. 

Navy Agent's office, N. E. corner of Baltimore and Charles streets, (second 

floor.) — Entrance on N. Charles street. 
Samuel McClellan, Navy Agent. | George F. Miller, Clerk. 

Baltimore Fire Department. 

Baltimore United Fire Department. — Incorporated in 1834. 

Is composed of delegates from the different lire companies. Each company is 
represented by seven delegates. The object of the department is, the better 
regulation of the fire companies composing the association, and for the redress 
of all grievances, and the settlement of all disputes arising between the com- 
panies. The department has power to impose fines, and to expel refractory 
companies from the corporation. Jeesfr Hunt, president, W. H. Watson, se- 
cretary, and Hugh Bolton, treasure!. 

FIRE COMPANIES IN BALTIMORE. 



NAMES: 


Inc. 


Mechanical, . • 


1763 


Union, . . . . • 


178? 


Friendship, . • 


178.', 


Deptford, . . . 


17H-: 


Liberty, .... 


1794 


Independent, . 


171H 


Vigilant, .... 


1804 


New Market, . 


180;", 


Columbian, . . 


ISO.", 


Franklin, . . . 


ISO., 


United, .... 


1810 


First Baltim're, 


1810 


Washington, . 


1815 


Patapsco, : . . 


182:-; 


Howard, .... 


1 830 


Watchman, . . 


1841 



LOCATION. 



S. Calvert street, . 
Hanover & Camden, 
N. Frederick street, 
Market and Fleet sts. 
Park and Liberty sts. 
Gay and Ensor st-:. 
Lombard and High, 
Eutaw street, . . . 
Market and Fleet sts, 
Market and Fleet sts, 
Howard and Liberty, 
McClellan street, . 
Lombard street, . . 
North and Fayette, 
Paca, near Fayette, 
Light street, .... 



PRESIDENTS. SECRETARIES 



T. M. Locke,. . 
Geo. Valiant, . . 
C. W. Karthaus, 
John Dutton, . . 
Joshua Vansant, 

J. O. Law 

W. Reanny, . . 
— Ireland, . . . 
J. Henderson, . 
W. Wickersham, 
VV. T. Rice, . . . 

S. Keerl, 

Wm. Wilson, . ; 
J. I. Cohen, jr. . 
B. P. Caughy, . . 
G. Brown, .... 



John Furlong. 
W. R. Patterson. 

D. Super. 

O. Monsarrat. 

A. Reese. 

W. L. Richardson. 
L. D. Daniels. 
H. E. Huber. 
Aaron Stockton. 
James Young. 

E. C. Steuart. 

B. F. Zimmerman. 
Wm. C. Simms. 
J. C. Holland. 

S. Reese. 

J. R. Jackson. 



Temperance Societies, 



NAMES. 



Washington, ■ 

Maryland State, ■ 

Jefferson, . - - 

Union,- -.--...-, 

Marion, , 

Neptune, 

Marion, Junior, ..... 

Howard, 

Howard, Junior, - - . - - 

East Baltimore, 

West Baltimore, 

Washington, Junior, .... 
William street Station, - - - 
William street Station, Juvenile, 
Whatcoat, ....... 



Mbs PRESIDENTS SECRETARIES 



W. K. Mitchell, 
Hon. S. Archer, 
A. B. Wolfe, - 
D. Parr, - - - 
Thos. Pindall, • 
T. Bruff, - - • 
M. Crownover, 
W. H.Watson, 
G. C. Gault, - 
W. H. Small, ■ 
M. Turner, - - 
P. J. Hedean, - 
J. McCleary, - 
William Krebs, 
H. Ruttery 



James Dunn. 
C. R. Taylor. 
H. Graby. 
T. W. Ewing. 
J. N. Millington. 
T. J. Warrington. 
A. Gibson, jr. 
R- A. McAllister. 

C. Boyd. 
J. Clarke. 

J. P. Thomas. 
J. S. Browne. 
T. Cornelius. 

D. Horn. 



M I 8 C E L I. 4 N BOOB INS TIT D T 10 N S . 93 

Military Companies in Baltimore. 

The uniformed Volunteer Corps of the city of Baltimore are comprised, gene- 
rally, in tin- First Light Division of Maryland Volunteers, in pursuance ot the 
provision of the ai I ol Lssemblj of 1836, chap. 295. This Division is composed 
of two Brigades, — th<- First and Second Light Brigades, — and each Brigade is 
composed of two Res in* 

The Firs! Lighl B I '■'■■ i'imc-nt of Artillery and 

the Fifth Regiment ol infantry and the Second Light Brigade of the First Rifle 
it, and the Kilty third Regiment of Infantry, Besides these, there is the 
Fifth Regiment o I Cavalry, and Capt- (r. I'. Kane's corps of Eagle Artillerists, 
whit b are attached to the Third l>r ision Maryland Militia, under the command 
of Major General John Spear Smith. 

Tin B tltimore Citj Guards an- not uniformed, and in fact are almost without 
organization. By the acts of Assembl] of 1835, chaps. 11 and 207, authority is 
raise a Company in each ward of the city; but tliere never were more 
than three or fo i .,,i of these but one, we believe, exists,— that of 

the First Ward. under Captain Cooney, which is fully uniformed and equipped. 
The City Guards are divided into two Regiments, and the whole Brigade is under 
command of General Columbus O'Donnell. 

FIELD OFFICERS — FIRST LIGHT DIVISION. 
Maj. Gen. George H. Steuart, I Brig. General Benjamin C. Howard. 

Aids,— G.H. Harrison, C.H. Winder. Aids,— H. G. D. Carroll, William 

Division Inspector, Fitzhugh, | Gilmor. 

Fifth Regiment Maryland Volunteer Infantry. 
Col N. Hickman, I Adj. Charle's Z. Lucas, I Surg., F. E. B. Hintze. 

Lt Col. S. Hillen, Qr. Master, Victor Vallette. Surg.Mate, E.F.Perkins. 

Maj. H. S. Sanderson, | Paj Master, Thomas Carroll, | 
First Baltimore Light Infantry, -•--.-- Capt. Danneker. 

Independent Blues, Capt. Lilly. 

Mechanical Volunteers, Capt. Watkins. 

Eutaw Infantry, Capt. Keyser. 

Marion Guards, Capt. Lucas. 

German Guards, Lieut Ismael. 

Pint Regiment Artillery. 
Lieutenant Colonel H. McKinncIl, | Adjutant R. M. Welch. 

Junior Artillerists, Capt. J. B. Klunk. 

Fifty-third Regiment Maryland Volunteer Infantry. 
Col. John Spear Nicholas. I Adjutant C. P. Durham, 

Lieut. Col. S. Owings Hoffman: | Pay Blaster Thomas E. Tilden. 

First Baltimore City Guards, Capt. Millikin. 

Independent Greys, Capt Law, 

National Guards, Capt. Thompson. 

Maryland Cadets, Capt. Newman. 

First Baltimore Invincible', Capt. Anderson. 

Independent German Yagers, Capt Frederick. 

La Fayette Volunteers. Capt. Roberts. 

Eagle Rille Corps, (Baltimore county,) .... Capt Smith. 

First Rijle Regiment 
I Maj 

Lieut Col. John Dutton, Adjutant J. G. Roberts. 

Morgan Volunteers, Capt. H. Hammond. 

Howard Riflemen, Capt J. Branson. 

First Baltimore Sharp Shooters, 

Fifth Regiment Cavalry. 
Lieutenant Colonel Benzinger, | Major Eoulden. 

Independent Light Dragoons, Capt. S. C. Owens. 

Uniformed Company attached to third division Maryland Militia. 

Eagle Artillerists, - - Capt G. P. Kane. 

DEFENDERS OF BALTIMORE.— The survivors of the gallant army, 
which defended the city from invasion in 1814, compose this highly honorable 
society. Meets semi-annually. Gen. Win. McDonald, president; CoL David 
Harris, Gen. Benjamin C. Howard, Major William Jackson, Major William 
Roney. and Jos. K. Stapleton, vice presidents ; H. W. Gray, secretary. | 



Col. J. L. Maguire, Major George Peters, jr. 



BALTIMORE BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



[This Directory contains a list of the names of persons engaged in business, 
with the occupation of each, and the place where their business is conducted. 
The different professions, as well as the names are alphabetically arranged, 
affording at once, a key to the enquirer, and an advertisement to the trades- 
man. By this arrangement the knowledge required in regard to the person or 
the firm sought, may be obtained at a glance. It was the design of the pub- 
lisher to have given a complete list of all the business men in the city ; but 
owing to the backwardness of some in handing in their names, business, &c. he 
has not succeeded in making the Directory as perfect as would have been desi- 
rable. In another year he hopes to overcome all difficulties, and present the 
citizens of Baltimore with a full and entire epitome of the operations of the 
whole city. To effect this end, the publisher will make it his business, during 
the ensuing summer, to collect the names, and learn the business and residence 
of every Professional man and Tradesman within the limits of the city,— all of 
which will be given in the next number of the Directory, without charge, and 
in the style of the following pages, except that advertisements will be excluded. 
It is in contemplation to reduce the price of succeeding numbers of the work 
so as to place it within the reach of every individual in the city— and as the 
name, business and residence of all business men toill be given, the publisher 
confidently anticipates a corresponding increase of the sales of the work, from 
which alone can he expect any remuneration for the necessary time and great 
expense of collecting and arranging the matter for publication.] 



Agricultural Stores. 

Chenoweth, Richard B., manufactures 
and keeps always on hand, an exten- 
sive and general assortment of Agri- 
cultural Implements, which he will 
sell at the lowest cash prices. Orders 
received for Hussey's Reaping Ma- 
chines, Corn Shelierand Crusher, will 
be promptly attended to, at the manu- 
facturer's prices. Warerooms, No. 
30 Pratt street, between Gay and Com- 
merce streets. Manufactory, corner 
Front and Plowman sts. 

Eastman, Jonathan S., Pratt street, be- 
tween Charles and Hanover streets, 
a short distance above the rail road 
depot, patentee of Eastman's Cylin- 
drical Straw Cutters, which are kept 
constantly on hand, of all sizes, both 
of iron and wood frames — also, thresh- 
ing machines, horse powers, corn 
shellers, a great variety of improved 
ploughs, and almost every other im- 
plement in the Agricultural line— 
also,Landreth's superior garden seeds, 
at retail, and dealer in grass seeds, 
etc. etc. 

Mott, A. G. & N. U., manufacturers of 
agricultural implements, S. E. corner 
Front and Ensor streets, O. T. 

Sinclair, Robert, jr. & Co., Light, near 
Pratt street, agricultural implement 
manufacturers, and seedsmen. 

Amusements. 

Benjamin, R., proprietor of the Billiard 
Saloon, 91 Baltimore street, (up stairs) 
entrance, also, from North street, ad- 
joining the Patriot office. 



Kensett& Perry, Gymnasium and Spar, 
ring rooms. 10 Holliday, between Bal- 
timore and Fayette streets. 

Museum and Gallery of the Fine Arts, 
corner of Baltimore and Calvert sts. 
Miss Phillips, Manageress. 

Phillips, J. H. & Co., proprietors of the 
Washington Museum, over the Mary- 
land arcade, Centre Market Space, 
contains, among other attractions, 
25 wax figures, 60 grand cosmoramic 
views, and extra entertainments in the 
saloon every evening. 

Theatre, Front street.— F. C. Wemyss, 
manager. 

Theatre, Holliday street.— Closed. 

Spies, Charles L., professor of dancing, 
Central Hall, corner of Charles and 
Baltimore streets, teaches the above 
art in all its branches. Practising balls 
every Wednesday evening. Open 
from September until May. 

Apothecaries. 

Andrews, George W., practical chemist, 
druggist, &c. 3 Baltimore st, where 
physicians may depend upon having 
their prescriptions compounded with 
accuracy and neatness, and where 
pure and genuine medicines are al- 
ways dispensed. 

Bain, James, corner of Gay and East 
streets, O. T. 

Briee, William N., successor toWm. R. 
Fisher, chemist and druggist, 192 Bal- 
timore street 

Chapman, John L., 2 South street and 
2 Sharp street. 

Fisher, A. F., 10 Pennsylvania avenue. 



BALTIMORE BUSINESS 

Gould, Moses, west Baltimore, between 
Pine and Cove streets. 

Kramer & Shane, Light street wharf, 
between Barre and Lee streets. 

Love, William S., 66 Lexington street. 

Mackenzie & Co., chemists and drug- 
gists, cornel B tltimore and N. Gaj at 

McCormick, .1 . O. & \. \\ ., 16 N. Gay 
6treet, O. T., manufacturers of perfu- 
mery, fancy soaps, cosmetics, &c. &c. 

Monsarratt, 14-2, Baltimore 

Moore, Win. Boswell, apothecary ami 
chemist, corner N. High and Pitt sta. 

Orrick, William K.. north-east corner 
Eutaw and i 

Perkins, J, F.4 111"-'., rurnor Franklin 

and Greene streets, dealers in chem- 

. punts, oils, .mil dye-stuffs; 

and manufacturers of plat 

ments, bins mass, blister cloths, i-c. 

Pitt, [.Thomas, 21 Market street, K. P. 

Roberts & Atkinson, corner of Balti 
mop' and Hanover stre< ; . 
agents for Swaim's Panacea, keep con- 
stantly on hand a general assortment 
of medicines, drugs, paints, oils, patent 
medicines and perfumery. Dwellings 
S. side Lombard, W. of Gl 

Sawyer, James A., 107 Pratt street, 3 
doors west of Eutaw street. 

Scott, James W., no Baltimore street. 

Stansbury, J. B., 37 Thames st, F. P. 

Tucker, G. W., corner Pratt and Eden 
streets, F. P. 

Wiseman, C, apothecary and druggist, 
and manufacturer of blacking, ink, 
varnishes, &c, west Baltin 
Cove st, 

Williamson, J. P., north-west corner of 
Gay and High ste. 

Architects and Builders. 

Harris, Samuel, architect and measurer 

of buildings, -22 west Fay< 

between Howard and Lib 
Minirie, William. Fayette street, oppo 

site the post office. 

Artificial Flowers. 

Baker, Mary Ann, -222 Baltimore street, 
(up stairs, ) manufacturer and importer 
of artificial flowers. 

Franchi, Andrew, 36 Baltimore street, 

ami ir I'; ..-' : I - I 

ma actures and keeps 

\ on hand, an extensive as- 
sortment of artificial flowers, which 
\.i!l be sold, wholesale or retail, on 
as reasonable terms as they can be 
purchase I elei where. 

Gould, Mrs. A., 71 west Pratt street. 

Auctioneers. 

Beadel, Henry & Co., auctioneers and 
commission merchants. 11 German st. 

Bool, H. W., 60 Baltimore street, auc- 
tioneer and commission merchant. 



R B C T O R Y 



\>r, 



Gl John L, corner ol Front and 

■ 
Hall, R. M. & Co., 21 south CI 
Hoflmai 

ti sers and commission merchants. 

Lemmon. R. & Co. Buchanan's whan". 
Merrill, Hotchkiss & Co., aucti 

and . - . . - 

man street. ])ws.- K. H. M< n ill, 

Green, 2d door north from Fayette st.; 
.1. Phelps Hotchkiss, Franklin, 2d door 

\v. \. Dutch, 
Lexington, 2 1 door east of !':■. 

-t, 

Taylor, R. A. St Co.,8 '■ 
tioneers and commission merchants. 

We ver, Cannon <S Co.,28BOutb Charles 
street, general auctioneers and com- 
mission merchants. 

Whiteley, A., 44 south Charles street. 

Bakers. 

Kernan, Peter, cracker and biscuit ba- 
ker, 7* east Pratt street, and 3 McEl- 
derry's wharf. Dw. 150 Sharp street. 
• lit and cracker 

manufacturers, 76 Pratt street, three 
doors east of South street. Dwelling, 
Wilk, one door west of Canal street. 

Met,, if, Edward, wholesale and retail 
baker, 4»: - 

Petei 3,Wm., Block and Lnn sta., F. P. 

Band and Fancy Boxes. 

Barnes'paper boxes, from Philadelphia, 
at 2 Hanover street, (up stairs.) Or- 
ders received for all the various kinds 
of boxes, and executed with more 
ti te and despatch than at any other 
establishment in tl 

Pulvermacher, F., 21 Pratt street, be- 
tween Hanover and diaries sts. 

Warren, William, 2 Holliday street. 

Baskets and Wooden 
Ware . 

Murdock, C, wholesale dealer in paint- 
ed buckets, brooms, brushes, baskets, 
mats, wood ware, &c, bS south Cal- 
vert street, between Pratt and Lom- 
bard streets. 

Rowe, S. jr., 70 south Calvert street, 
manufacturer and wholesale dealer in 
brooms, buckets, cedar ware, &c. 

Washington, William, basket manufac- 
turer, 43 north Howard street 

Baths. 

Hussey & Elder, Eutaw house, Eutaw 
street. 

Milhau, T... proprietor of the Colonnade 
baths, Saratoga street. Open every 
day for the reception of bathers, dur 
bag the summer, and on Saturday s and 
Sundays during the winter. Attached 
to the bath house, is a reading room 
for the accommodation of visiters. 



96 



BALTIMORE 



Rose, Dr. John, shower, vapor, and 
medicated baths, Faca, near Pratt st. 

Bell Hangers. 

Clark, James, 6 north Frederick street. 

Colton cfc McAleer, 92 Harrison street. 

Evatt, Mrs. Ellen, Water street, oppo- 
site Cheapside. 

Evatt, C, 54 Light street. 

Stewart, Columbus J., bell hanger and 
locksmith, 133 Bank lane, opposite 
Barnum's hotel. 

Blacksmiths. 

Buchta, John, 42 Harrison street. 

Devalin, Hugh, smith in general, 88 
Harrison street. 

Jones, William, Thames street, F. P. 

Pagels, E. & G. H., corner of Saratoga 
and Jasper streets, smiths m general. 
Constantly on hand a supply of tobac- 
co knives, churn irons, &c. 

Mettee, M. W., smith in general, Har- 
rison street, between the bend and 
Gay street, is extensively prepared 
to execute every branch in his line of 
business, with neatness and despatch 
and on reasonable terms. Particular 
attention is paid to house smith 
and to the manufacturing and fitting 
up of iron railings, wrought or cast, 
for steps or fencing. 

Mettee, L. C, horse shoer, railing ma- 
ker, and blacksmith in general, 13 
Balderston street, having commenced 
the above business, is now prepared to 
execute all kinds of work, in his line, 
entrusted to him, with promptness 
and despatch, in the very best manner 
and on the lowest terms. 

Simpson, W., Water, near Light street. 

Smith & Cullinmore, corner of Thames 
and Wolf streets. 

Weiker, John, Potter, above Hillen St., 
O. T., smith in general. 

Block & Pump Makers. 

Cathcart, Robert & Wm., Thames, 2 
doors west of Ann street, F. P. 

McLeane, Elias, 59 Pratt street. 

Morrow, S. W., 96 Dugan's wharf. Or- 
ders from any part of the state punc- 
tually attended toon reasonable terms. 

Powell, Henry, 7 McElderry's wharf. 

Thomas, William, 10 Grant, near Pratt 
street wharf, ship chandlery store, and 
block and pump maker, keeps con- 
tantly on hand a general assortmentof 
articles in his line of business. All 
orders promptly attended to. 

Waggner, G., cor. of Thames and Wolf 
streets, F. P. 

Boarding Houses. 

C laugh ton, P. C, Fulton boarding house, 
4 south Calvert street. 



[ESS DIRECTORY. 

Muhlhofer, J. M., 62 north Gay st. 
Sparrow, John, 49 Market space. 
White, .Mrs., accommodates transient 
and permanent boarders, 2S0 Bait. St. 

Boat Builders. 

Easley, Thos., corner York and Willicon 

Bts., south side of basin. 
James, Levi, east Thames st., F. P. 

Bookbinders. 

Cook, Isaac P., 52 Baltimore street. 

Crownfield, F., 24 north Frederick st. 

Hickman, N., 86 Baltimore street. 

Lane, J. H., Bank lane, opposite the 
Union bank. Dw. Granby, bel. Goffst. 

Lovegrove, Jas., bookbinder and patent 
machine ruler, 23 S. Calvert st. 

Math er,.William, (of New York,) would 
respectfully inform the gentlemen of 
Baltimore, that having lately returned 
from Europe, he has commenced the 
bookbinding business in Bank lane, 
(rear of Barnum's hotel,) and trusts, 
by unremitting attention and strict 
punctuality in the execution of all or- 
ders, to merit a share of public pa- 
tronage. W. M. has brought over 
from London, specimens of the latest 
fashions of ornamental stamps, &c. 
for gdding; copies from which have 
been manufactured by the best Ame- 
rican artists, which enable him to fin- 
ish all books confided to his care, in a 
superior style of excellence. All kinds 
of stationery supplied or bound to or- 
der. N. B. Gentlemen who cannot 
conveniently call upon him, will please 
send their orders through the post 
office, when they shall be waited on at 
their residence, and shown specimens 
of workmanship. 

Peters, Wm. L.,7 N- Liberty st., book- 
binder and machine ruler. Blank 
books made to order, and old books 
hondsomely rebound. 

Wright, Joel, bookbinding and machine 
ruling, 245 Baltimore street, between 
Howard and Eutaw sts. Dwelling, 
Conway, west of Eutaw st. 

Booksellers & Stationers. 

Brunner, D. 1 N. Charles st. Protestant 
Episcopal book depository, and agent 
for papers and periodicals issued by 
the Church. 

Candler, Isaac, Pratt, near Hanover st 

Cook, Isaac P. 52 Baltimore street, 3 
doors west of Gay. Bookbinding neat- 
ly executed. 

Cushing & Bro. 20o Baltimore street. 

Gushing, John & Co. 6 N. Howard st. 

Hantzsche, John T. 20 Baltimore street, 
between Frederick and Harrison st. 

Hickman, N. bookseller, stationer, pe- 
riodical agent and bookbinder, 80 Bal- 
timore street. 



B A L T I M 



o a 



DIRECTORY. 



99 



Knight & Colburn, 171 Baltimore st. 
i (ill X. 258 Baltimore st. 

Lovegrove, James, stationer's ball, 23 
south Calvert street, blank book ma- 
nufacturer, patent machine ruler, and 
stationer in general. M< 
count books ofei erj desi ription, com- 
posed of the best materials, and bound 
in superior style. Job printing and 
bookbinding neatly executed. Rags 
and quills taken in exchange for arti- 
cles of stationery. 

jr. 138 Baltimore 

Moore, J. half price antiquarian book 
store, 74 Baltimore street. ' 
second-hand books bought, sold, or 
exchai 

Kunday, 11. 63 N. Howard st. 

Plaskitt & Cuyle, 218 Baltimore street. 
Dwellings, John Plaskitt, Monument, 
corner Park street; John Cuyle, 92 
Hanover street 

Ramsey, Jos. A. Market street, F. P. 

Robinson, J. 110 Baltimore st. 

Steever, Geo. 20 Pennsylvania avenue. 

Turner, Henry A. 1"> North st., prints, 
songs, toy books and play store. 

TQyard, J.'w. agent lor Sunday School 
Depository, 15 south Calvert st. 

Bonnets «Sf Straw Goods. 

Atwooil, S. &, B. manufacturers ofstraw 
bonnets, and dealers in palm leaf 
hoods and hats, 187 Baltimore street, 
up stairs, over E. B. Estes. 

Burns, M. straw hat and bonnet maker, 
3-2 Centre Market Space. 

Warner, Lewis M. & Co. 13.5 Baltimore 
street, (up stairs,) dealers in Leghorn 
hats and straw bonnets, ribbons and 
artificial llowers, umbrellas and para- 
sols, fur, hair, and sealette caps, &c. 

Boot and Slioe Makers. 

Adams, David, cor. Lomberd and High. 

Allen, T. S., cor. Howard and Conway. 

Bangs, John, 80 Pratt st. betw. Sharp 
and Howard, Ladies and Gentlemens 
cheap and fashionable Boot and Shoe 
store. 

Eangs, William H., 2 Hanover st wholi ■ 
sale and retail dealer, and manufac'r. 

Biatenger, John D., Pa. avenue, oppo. 
site state hay scale. 

Butler, A. C, 3 Hanover st. 

Butler, Thomas, 53 W. Pratt st. three 
doors below Sharp st., Ladies and 
Gentlemens Boot and Shoe maker. 

Claiborne, Chs. H., Elisor, near Ease st 

Colton, William, 24 Market St., F. P. 

Croehaw, Wm.34 Pratt st. 

Dent, Charles, 44 Baltimore st. 

Donadieu, P., 15 E. Baltimore st. 

Dorman, Thomas. 12 Baltimore st. 

Fimister, Alexander, dealer in Boots 
and Shoes of Eastern and Baltimore 
manufacture, 30 Marsh Market Space 



Ford. Kin-. ".I X. Kutaw st. 

Fritz, Charles A. Bond st F.P. 

George, la lac S. 64 Centre Market Sp. 
. James, at his old stand, 9 S. 
Calvei I itantlj on hand 

an e.\t .,i of J > r. ss, 

Pump, Cork and Double-soled Boots, 
manufactured under his immediate 
direction, from the very best materi- 
als, and in a style of neatness and 
durability which cannot be surpassed 
by any oilier manufacturer in the U.S. 
and at prices as low as the same de- 
scription of work can be had in this 
city. Hi3 numerous City, Southern 
and Western customers, and Country 
Merchants generally are respectfully 
reminded that he is now, and will at 
all times be prepared to till their or- 
ders with his usual promptness, and 
with work which for excellence of 
materials, elegance of finish, durabili- 
ty and cheapnes, cannot be excelled 
here nor elsewhere. 

Harman, George, 54 Pratt st. 

Harman, John, 12 X. Liberty st. 

Hamer, W. H. cor. Carolioe and Pratt. 

Hayes, Ths. Gay st. opposite Exchange. 
-A.i south Gay st. 

Hill, John H. 54 X. Cay st. 

Irelan, David, manufacturer of Ladies 

and Gentlemens fine Boots, Shoes and 

> Baltimore street, (up 

Ismael, George, E. Pratt st. bet Albe- 
marle and Plowman sts. 

Keirle, Matthew, 74 Lexington st 

Kummer, John, 16 S. Howard st. 

Lafetra, Jacob, Ladies and Gentlemens 
Boot and Shoe maker, 64 Pratt street, 
dw. 28 \. Gay st. 

Lewis, James. 1 1-2 Holliday st manu- 
factures Gentlemens Boots of every 
description, of the latest and most 
approved fashion, of the best materi- 
als, and at prices to suit not only the 
times, but the wishes of all who may 
call. 

Long,Wm. Market st. F.P. 

Love. Joseph, 77 Hanover stop, market 

Lone. Levi, basement Barnum's Hotel. 

McDowell, Thomas, wholesale and te- 
tail, 16 X- Gavst. 

Miller, Dominick, 40 W. Fayette st. 

Norris, Saml. 01 W. Pratt, near Sharp st 

Peck, H. 11 Pratt st. wholesale and re- 
tail manufacturer. 

Roszberg, Gottlieb, Harrison, near Gay 
st. On hand and is daily making such 
as Ladies, Gentlemens, Misses and 
Childrens Boots and Shoes. He in- 
vites the public in general, and coun- 
try merchants in particular, to give 
him a call before purchasing. Con- 
stantly on hand all kinds of Boots and 
Shoes, coarse and fine. 

Schroeder, D. £ H. 83 X. Gay st 



98 



ALT I MORE BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Shutzi, Aug. D. 13 Light st. 
Stoops, A. 54 Lexington st. 
Switzer, John, cor. Penn. avenue and 

Seminary lane. 
Thater, Philip, 82 W. Pratt st. between 

Howard and Sharp sts. Boot and Shoe 

maker in both Ladies and Gentlemens 

branches. 
Wilcox, Wm. L. 7 X. Gay st. O.T. 
Wood, John, 26 1-2 N. Entaw st. 
Lrxdics Shoe Makers. 
Abbot, Stephen F. 3 Lexington st. 3 

doors west of Charles st. 
Ardin, David, 80 Harrison st. 
Bangs, John, 80 Pratt st. 
Chase, Wm. 27 W. Lexington st. 
Cole & McBriety,cor. Bait, and High. 
Coles, Wm. 98 Pitt st. O.T. 
Ellis & Nicolai, 63 Baltimore st. 
Goodman, E. C. 57 N. Gay st. O.T. 
Hamilton, J. cor. Lexington and Sharp. 
Hemmick, Jacob, 81 Lexington st. 
Hemmick, Geo. A. 9 Lexington st. 
Hissey, Wm. 50 Pratt st. 
Hugg, Richard, Park, st. op. Pleasant 
Hunt, John W. 15 S. Exeter si. 
Jenkins, Robert, 24 Fayette st. 
Leonard, Amasa, 48 N. Liberty st 
Marriott, J. H. 67 Baltimore st 
McMakin, B. Pratt st. betw. Eutaw and 

Norris, B.B., S. W. corner of Eutaw 
and Lexington sts., Ladies fashiona- 
ble Boot and Shoe maker, keeps con- 
stantly on hand, and manufactures to 
order, Elssler and Gaiter Boots, Jef- 
fersons, French Ties, Seal, Kid and 
Satin Slippers, and every other de- 
scription of Boots and Shoes for La- 
dies, Misses and Children, which he 
warrants to fit in the neatest manner, 
and of a style of workmanship, com- 
bining every desirable requisite, and 
as cheap as the cheapest. 

Pierson, "Wm. T. Ladies French Boot 
and Shoe maker, Saratoga st, below 
Charles. 

Rous, John G. 54 N. Howard st. 

Thorne.C.N. Ladies Philadelphia Boot 
and Shoe store, 121 1-2 Baltimore st. 
nearly opposite the Museum. 

Tunis, A., N.Gay st. near Bel Air market 

Walls, John, German st. below Sharp. 

Wheeler, S. German st. between How- 
ard and Liberty. 

Boots, Shoes, Hats, etc. 

WHOLESALE . 

Brooks, Towner& Tibbals. 255 Bait. St. 

Carroll, Charles H. dealer in shoes, hats, 
caps, bonnets, &c. N. W. corner Bal- 
timore and Liberty sts. (up stairs.) 

Menzies & Howe, dealer in boots, shoes 
hats, caps and bonnets, 232 Baltimon 
street, opposite Sharp st. (up stairs.) 

Pendexter & Alden, 248 1-2 Bait. st. 



Stearin, Thomas, dealer in shoes, palm 
hats, straw and domestic goods, 4 Ger- 
man st. 

Thurston & Webb, 5 Hanover st. 

Tiffany, Fite & Co. dealers in boots, 
shoes, hats, caps, &c. 199 Baltimore 
street Dwellings, C. Tiffany, Madi- 
son street extended ; C. R. Fite, Sharp 
street, near German; Chas. A. Grin- 
nell, Courtland, near Franklin st. 

Tinges, W. George, dealer in shoes, 
hats, caps, bonnets, &c, N. E corner 
of Baltimore and Howard streets, (up 
stairs.) Dwelling, 102 Park st., near 
Franklin. 

Ware, Robert S. 202 Baltimore street, 
(up stairs,) dealer in boots, shoes, 
hats, caps and bonnets. 

Watkins, Dungan & Rust, dealers in 
boots, shoes, caps, fur, wool and palm 
leaf hats and bonnets, 186 Baltimore 
street. Dwellings, Thomas C. Wat- 
kins, Lee, between Charles and Hano- 
ver streets; F. D. Dungan, Fayette, 
between Pine and Cove streets; Geo. 
Rust, jun., boards at Beltzhoover's 
hotel. 

Walker &. Kimberly, dealers in boots, 
shoes, hats, caps, bonnets, trunks, 
blacking, &c. corner of Howard and 
Baltimore sts. (up stairs.) 

Botanic Medicines. 

Larrabee,Eph., Phoenix Establishment — 
the first mdl erected in the U. S. for the 
special purpose of preparing Thom- 
3onian Botanic Medicines. Labora- 
tory, 20 south Calvert street. Always 
on hand, the largest and most valua- 
ble collection of Botanic medicines in 
the United States — comprising all the 
various compounds and crude arti- 
cles, recommended by Dr. Samuel 
Thompson, besides a great variety of 
other Botanic medicines. 

Rose, John, south Paca. near Pratt st. 

Williams, John M. 53 Harrison st. 

Williams, W. J. cor. Front and Hillen, 

Bottling Establishm'ts. 

Boyd, John & Son, 11 South st. 

Walsh, Thomas, bottler, and porter, ale 
and cider refiner, keeps constantly on 
hand, London brown stout and Scotch 
ale, Poughkeepsie and Albany ales, 
Philadelphia pale ale and brown stout, 
and Baltimore porter and ale ; New- 
ark, and other ciders, in bottles and 
casks. Establishment, south Gay r st, 
near the Exchange. 

Brass Founders. 

Davis, Joseph H. corner Thames 

Fell streets, F. P. 
Mitchell, Wm., North st, opposite the 

gas house. 



BALTIMORE BUSIS E B B 



RECTORY. 



<M> 



Odell, James H. 37 S. Frederick street, 
brass and composition founder, is pre- 
pared to furnish all kinds of braae 
work, such as soda pumps ami appa- 
ratus, hose screws, still, and stop 
cocks, copper rivets, brass solder, etc. 
Fire engines built and repaired. .Slop 
work, church and steamboat bells, 
made to order. 

Paul, Alex., Lexington, west of Green st. 

Peters, Wm. corner of Concord and 
l'ratt sts., near the bridge. 

Brewers. 

Clagctt, E. dwelling and brewery, east 
Lombard street, near the bridge. 

Lucas, S. corner Conway and Hanover 
streets. 

Medtart, J. &. J. L. brewery, Saratoga, 
near Cove. 

Brickinakers. 

Russell, Alex. .jr. & Co. Columbia st., 
nearly opposite Green st. 

Warner, Michael, jr. continues in the 
brickmaking business, Scott street, 7 
doors west of Columbia street, and is 
solicitous of his friends and the pub- 
lic's favors. 

Brokers— Stock and Exchange. 

Coale, Wm. K. 172 Baltimore street 
Coaklev, P. H.cor. Lombard and South 

streets. 
Cohen, Benj. I, corner Baltimore and 

Calvert sts. 
Cohn, David I. Franklin Bank building. 



Ludlow, Parshall & Co. Bullion and 

Exchange Brokers,— dealers in all 

kinds of uncurrentbank notes, specie, 

;es, \-c Ac. in 1-2 Baltimore, 

near Calvert street. 

. i o. ih-2 Ualtimore st. 
Pairo & Bro. ii« Baltimore st. 

Lottery and Exchange. 

Boone, John H. D. corner Gay and 
Baltimore streets. 

I'd., k, Wm. B., N. Gay street, near the 
engine house. 

Clark, John. Museum Building. 

Dickey, M. 8. 1 Light St. 

Doj 1- !, B. corner Light and Pratt sts. 

Doyle, M. 2 1 Pratt at., opposite Balti- 
more and Ohio Bail Road depot. 

Dutton, George H. 9 Pratt street. 

Gridley & Co , 4 1-2 X. Calvert St. 

Hamilton & Doyle, cor. of Exchange 
place and .South st. 

Heialer & Co. the old established house, 
No. 1, North Calvert street. Orders 
for Tickets from any part of the Un- 
ion meet with prompt and careful at- 
tention. Over one million of dollars 
have been distributed by these fortu- 
nate venders. Drafts. Notes, Bills of 
Exchange on all parts of the Union 
bought and sold on the best terms. 

Lambert, John R. 2 1-2 North Gay st 

Leach, C. L. 8 X. Howard st 

Lee, Josiah & Co. S. E. cor. of Balti- 
more and Calvert sts. 

Lupton, C. F. 249 Baltimore street. 

Lukens, E., N. E. corner of Baltim ore 



d Front sts. 
Lukens, E. & Miller, 12 1-2 Baltimore 
st. near Marsh Market Space. Orders 
for Tickets from any part of the U. S. 
will be thankfully received and 
promptly attended to 



North st. 

Dorsey, Joshua 19 Exchange building. 

Duzall, Lemuel E. Second st. near Gay. 

Harris, Samuel & Son, Stock, Exchange 
and Bank Note office, 88 Baltimore st. 
one door below North st Stocks of 

all kinds, Ground Rents, etc. bought Marshall & Bro. 156 Baltimore st 
and sold on commission. Drafts and Marshall, John, 19 Pratt street 
Notes collected. McPherson, Jonas. -224 Baltimore st 

Horwitz, T. B. Broker and Commission Miles, Diiah, 217 Baltimore street, be- 
Merchant, 6 S. Frederick st tween Liberty and Sharp sts. 

Peters, Jesse T. Stock, Exchange, and Nicholson, J. J. 235 Baltimore st. 
Commission Agent, X. W. corner of, NituoIson . J - L - & Bros. Lottery, Ex- 
Baltimore and North sts. change and Money Brokers, 16 and 

Ward, Wm. 37 Exchange place. 235 Baltimore street, and cor. Fish 

Wigman, H., North, near Baltimore st- and Marsh Market Space. 

Publication office of the Baltimore Robinson, Daniel, 105 north Howard 

Counterfeit Detector and Bank Note street. 

List Rochester, Wm. 12 Light street 

llf«^/... „„-7 v~~k „ Scribner, S. Si Co. Manager's office, Fay- 

Money and Exchange. | ett e, near Calvert strelt. 

Carter, Morton & Co. Exchange and Stoner, John L. 3 E. Baltimore st. 
Money Brokers, 135 Baltimore street Schoofield's Lottery and Exchange of- 



Uncurreut bank notes, and gold and 

silver coin of every description, bought 

and sold. 
Fowler & Bros. 170 Baltimore st. 
Greene, Edward, 182 Baltimore street 
Johnston & Lee, 

Calvert sts. 



fice, 34 Baltimore street, next door to 
the corner of Frederick street, where 
all the big prizes are sold. Give him 
a call. 
Ward. Wm. 37 Exchanne place. 
Baltimore and Winchester, Samuel, corner of Balti- 
I more and North sts. 



LTIMORE BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 



Butchers-Beef. 



I'ankard, Jacob, 
Carmichaei; William, - 
Church, Thomas, 
Dyer, Leon, - 
Eden, William, 
Elmore, James 
Farmer, Will.'am, - 
Gaasley, Jacob, 
Gallagher, Richard, - 
Gudman, John D. 
Godshall, Frederick, 
Hardy, John, 
Hoover, Fiancis, 
Kral't, George— Beef and 
I.i vering, George A. 
Mitchell, Thomas, 
Moon, Edward B. - 
Muckelroy, John, - 
Myers, James, . 
Myers, Charles, - 
Pentz, William F. - 
Pentz, P. Henry, 
Pentz, Samuel I. 
Reinhart, George, 
Rush, Robert, 
Rush, John, 
Thomas, James P. - 
Turner, Harry F. 
Turner, Lewis, 
Wilcox, Peter, - 

F 

Earranger, Lewis L, 
Bower, Jacob I. • 
Bower, Jacob I. 
Cook, Frederick, 
Hoffman, Aaron, 
Holland, George, 
Layer, Christian, 
Lawson, James, - 
Pappler, Jacob, 
Seltzer, Lewi.--, 
Super, Frederick, - 
Suter George, 
Zerweek, Daniel, 

S 

Huster, Andrew, 
Kral't, Frederick, 
Kraft, Jacob, . 
Turner, Joshua M 



Sheep Butcher 



oik B n t c li 



li c e p B « t c li 



Veal Butche 



Atkinson, George, - 
Bell, Christian A. 
Burke, Barney, 
Curtain, James 

Deale, George . 
Zeigler, Frederick M. - 

Brasli makers. 

Ferguson, B. cor. Howard and Fayette. 
Hope, Daniel, 50 west Pratt street, be- 
tween Charles and Hanover. 



49 

and 20 



43 
7 and 9 

10 
29 and 31 

53 



Lexing. 


H 


B 


_ 






56 


53 


— 








17 


.v> 





23 


34 





2 and 4 


10 


_ 


76 







74 


•1 





69 


35 





67 




_ 


83 








36 


9 





16 


91 





18 







30 


— 










28 


IT 


- 


44 






6 


13 


— 


— 


— 




— 


— 


_ 


— 





33 








11 


IS 


_ 


11 


4 


— 


— 


2? 


— 


~ 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 



_ 


_ 


- 








43 


28 




21 


23 


- 


79 


- 


- 


10 


20 


. 


38 


47 


' 


5S 


51 


= 


— 


16 


— 



27 


14 — 


l!l 
50 


-b 



Kemp, Henry, wholesale and retail i 
nufacturer, 5 N. Howard st. 

Page, Joseph, wholesale and retail i 
nufacturer, 39 N. Howard st. 



BALTIMORE BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



101 



Ramsey, William, wholesale and retail 
manufacturer, 17 N. Howard st 

Stapleton, J. K. wholesale and retail 
brush, bellows, and (ishing tackle ma- 
nufacturer, 268 Baltimore et. 

Cabinet Makers. 

Beatson, H., Lombard st. above Howard, 
adjoining Friend's Meeting House, 
cabinet maker and upholsterer. 

Bowers & Hume, 49 S. Charles, near 
Pratt street 

Bobeth & Schubenberg, cabinet and 
chair makers, Sharp, one door south 
of Pratt st. 

Brashears, J. B 31 South st 

Byrne, J. 41 South st., undertaker, etc. 

Cinnamond, J. 3 west Lexington st 

Clemmons, VV. 18 Pennsylvania avenue. 

Clemens, Augustus D., N. Gay, near 
Potter st, O. T. 

Eastwood & Marsh, 27 E. Baltimore st 

Emich, Andrew, Paca st, 2d house N. 
of Lexington market. 

Foss, Wm. W. 79 Fayette street. 

Frey, Samuel, S. E. corner of Eutaw 
and Lexington sts. 

Gillespie, Stephen, Fayette, near Gay- 
street 

Griffiss, James, N. Gay street, opposite 
Mott st near the Bel Air market 

Hiss & Austin, cabinet and mahogany 
chair makers, 69 Fayette st 

Leitz, Andrew, Pennsylvania avenue, 
between Biddle and St. Mary's sts. 

McCracken, J. & W. 97 Pratt st 

Muhlhofer, J. M. 62 N. Gay st. 

Murray, Wm. cabinet and chair manu- 
facturer, 24 Lexington st 

Needles, John, 54 Hanover st 

Pursley, James, Saratoga, one door east 
of Howard st 

Renwick, Robert, 84 N. Howard st 

Rodenmayer, G. C. cabinet maker and 
undertaker, 93 Ensor st, O. T. 

Shryock, Henry S. Fayette street, oppo- 
site Assembly Rooms. 

Tarr, Edwin S. 4 N. Gay st 

Tarr, Wesley B. 32 N. Gay street, oppo- 
site the Shot Tower. 

Wiegel, Henry ,19 Water street, between 
South and Calvert ; also warerooms 
at 4 Cheapside. 

Ziegenfelder, Carl Frederick, S. Paca, 
above Pratt st. 

Card Manufacturers. 

Chase, Wells, 5 S. Eutaw st, dealer in 
wool, machine cards, manufacturers' 
findings, tinners' tools, and machines, 
etc. etc. 

Haskell, J.H. steam card factory, leather 
store, and manufacturers' warehouse, 
Eutaw, above Pratt st 

Schmidt, Charles, Light, corner of Bal- 
timore St., manufacturer of porcelain 
and playing cards, fancy papers, etc. 



Carpenters and Builders. 

Caldwell, W. Q., Fayette, near Gay st. 

Carman, D. S. & Murray, house carpen- 
ters, and manufacturers of sash and 
Venitian shutters, moveable and sta- 
tionary slats, etc. 6 Grant street, be- 
tween Lightand Calvert streets; also 
printers' furniture of every descrip- 
tion. All orders, from the city or 
country, will be attended to at the 
shortest notice— the work done in the 
most workmanlike manner, and on 
reasonable terms. 

Cunningham, W. C. 10 Comet st 

Dean, Thomas, McClellan's alley, near 
Fayette st. 

Downey, John, 50 N. Gay street, oppO' 
site the Shot Tower. 

Ehrrnan, J., German, near Eutaw st. 

Gardner, James, 10 S. Frederick, near 
Baltimore st. 

Gilpin, H. L., Mercer, near Calvert st. 

Hess, Samuel. Dwelling, Saratoga, be- 
tween Howard and Eutaw sts. 

Irvine, John F. Cowpen alley. 

Kirk, W., Clay, above Liberty st. 

Klunk, J. B., Pennsylvania avenue, be- 
tween Biddle and St. Mary's sts. 

McMillan & Davis, 85 Conway st. 

Morrow, John, corner Hanover and Lee 
sts., opposite Public School, No. 4. 

Mudge, Wm., Grant St., between Balti- 
more and Mercer sts. 

Peregoy, C, Saratoga, between Cove 
and Pine sts. 

Quinlan, B. W. & J. E. corner of Grant 
street and Light alley, immediately in 
rear of Beltzhoover's Fountain Inn. 

Roche, M., Wine, rear of Light street. 
Jobbing in all its branches. 

Rouse, J. B. house carpenter and joiner, 
1 Lerew's alley. 

Simmons, S. T. carpenter and hat block 
maker, 13 Monument street, and 7 
York avenue. 

Stafford, J. & N. 39 Fell's street, F. P. 

Staylor, Henry, High street, one door 
east of French. 

Thompson, Thomas F. 100 Eutaw, north 

of Franklin st 
Welsh, J. & J. W. Hogg, 77 and 79 
North st., near Pleasant. 

Carpetings. 

Beck, Thomas, 45 Market space, three 
doors from the S. E. corner of Lom- 
bard street, carpet manufacturer and 
dyer, keeps constantly on hand an as- 
sortment of coverlids and ingrain car- 
petings. Also, manufactures to order, 
all kinds of carpets, and has for sale 
an assortment of carpet chains of va- 
rious colors. Dying done on the most 
reasonable terms. 

Crook /James, wholesale and retail car- 
pet and floor cloth dealer, 132 Bait st. 



103 



ALTIMORE BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Duvall & Bro. wholesale and retail car- 
pet dealers, 210 Baltimore st 

Fulton, Thomas H., N. Howard street, 
near the Bolton Depot, manufacturer 
of carpet chains of various colore, to- 
gether with every variety of cotton 
wrapping twine ; also black and white 
pelisse wadding, quilting bats, etc. etc. 

Jeffreys, Wm. 76 Baltimore st., corner 
of Holiiday. 

Lanpher & Wellman, dealers in car- 
peting, carpet chain, wrapping twine, 
boots, shoes, etc. etc. 272 Baltimore 
street. 

McDowell & Gable, importers and deal- 
ers in carpeting, floor oil cloth, etc. 
etc. 268 Baltimore st. 

Carvers. 

Hays, Robt. house and furniture carver, 
Gay St., opposite the exchange. 

Murray, M. carver, N. W. corner of Bal- 
timore and North streets, executes to 
order every description of ornamental 
work, (either of wood or iron,) in a 
cheap and tasty manner. For designs, 
or plans of vaults, monuments, tombs, 
or railings, (with estimates of their 
total cost,) apply as above. 

Chair Manufacturers. 

Bride, Cotter, rustic chair manufacturer, 
3 Lexington, near Liberty st. 

Gorrell, G. W. corner Fleet and Market 
sts., F. P. 

Hodgkinson, J. 32 Hanover st., fancy 
and Windsor chair manufacturer. 

Jeft'eris, W. Y., Second St., near Market 
space. 

Johnson, Howard, manufacturer of par 
lour and Windsor chairs, S. E. cornel 
of Paca and Lexington sts. Entrance 



May, J. A. fancy and Windsor chairs, 21 
Fayette, west of Liberty st. 

Mathiot, A. & J. B. 18 N. Gay st, where 
may be obtained all kinds of raw mate 
rials for the manufacture of chairs. 

Robinson, J. & Son, 51 South St., fancy 
and Windsor chair manufacturers. 

Shutt, Augustus P., 10 N. Gay st., con- 
stantly on hand, and finished to order 
chairs of every variety. 

Simonson, J. fancy and Windsor chair 
manufacturer, 23 Pratt st 

Simonson, Charles P. 65 Hanover s' 

Tucker & Robinson, fancy and Windsor 
chair manufacturers, 5 Exchange pi, 

Chemical Workers. 

Gist, Wm. corner of Eutaw and Conway 
sts., manufacturer of white lead, etc. 

Trego, W. manufacturing chemist. Of- 
fice, 59 Smith's wharf. Factory, cor- 
ner of Columbia and Cove sts. 



China and Glass Ware. 

Bokee, William F. 37 N. Howard st. 
between Fayette and Liberty streets. 
Wholesale and retail dealer in China, 
Glass and Queensware. 

Chapman, Geo. commission merchant, 
and dealer in American and English 
flint and green Glassware of every 
description. Also, agent for the sale 
of Brittania castors, lamps, ladles, 
tea and table spoons, cups, etc. 42 S. 
Charles st. 

Edwards &, Cobb, 7 N. Charles st. op- 
posite the Union Bank, commission 
merchants and agents of manufactur- 
ers of Glass, China and Earthenware, 
in original packages. 

Hammond & Porter, 204 Baltimore st. 

Kerr, E. M. & Co. China Hall, 196 Bal- 
timore street, wholesale Queensware, 
China and Glass warehouse. 

Levering, Clinton, (late A. R. Levering 
& Son,) 8 Pratt st. wharf. 

Levering &, Clement, 13 S. Calvert st. 

Marston, J. R. & F. W., 5 S. Liberty, 
near Baltimore st. importers and dea- 
lers in China, Glass and Queensware, 
wholesale and retail. 

Marston, James H. 4, Lorman's Row, 
Hanover street, wholesale and retail 
dealer in China, Glass and Earthen- 
ware, and agent for the New England 
Flint and New England Crown Glass 
Companies. 

Pawley, James, 18 S. Calvert st. 

Riley, A. cor. Water and S. Calvert sts. 

Smith & Sharkey, cor. S. Howard and 
German sts. 

Stilson, Mrs C. 13 S. Charles st. 

Wonderly Wm. S., N. Gay, near Front. 

Clothing Stores. 

Buckley, Robert L., fashionable and 
ready made Clothing, 19 Pratt st. four 
doors above Charles. 

Caldwell, Wm. 75 N. Howard st 

Caughy, John H. wholesale and retail 
Clothier, Centre Market space, gran- 
ite front store, next door to Maryland 
Arcade. 

Coonan, Daniel, wholesale and retail 
Clothing establishment, No. 58 Centre 
Market space, south of Lombard st. 

Cooke, John, wholesale and retail cheap 
Clothing store, 103 N. Howard st 

Dahle, C. & F. W. Schwalbe, 22 Centre 
Market space, fashionable ready made 
Clothing. Also, on hand an extensive 
assortment of Cloths, Cassimeres and 
Vestings. 

Fry, G. 28 Pratt st. opposite Patterson. 

Lipp, Joseph, 81 N. Howard st. 

Orman, H. 22 N. Eutaw st. cheap and 
fashionable Clothing store, wholesale 
and retail. 

Wilson Thomas, cor. South and Pratt 



ALTIMORE BUSINE 



DIRECTORY. 



103 



Clock Dealers. 

Hale, Elias, 9 Baltimore street, (near the 
bridge,) wholesale and retail dealer in 
clocks, jewelry, and fancy goods. Ev- 
ery variety of eastern clocks constancy 
oil hand, and for sale at manufactur 
ers' prices. 

Smith &. Fenn, 34 S. Charles street, ma- 
nufacturers and dealers in clocks of 
every description, wholesale and retail. 
Watch signs, and clock parts and trim 
mings, for sale ; also clocks repaired 
and warranted. 

Coach Builders. 

Bishop, Richard, coach builder and har- 
ness manufacturer, N. Charles street, 
between Lexington and Fayette sts., 
keeps constantly on hand a general as- 
sortment of new and second hand 
work, which he will sell on very accom- 
modating terms. Every description 
of work in his line of business, made 
and repaired neatly, promptly, and ir 
the very best manner, and on moder 
ate terms. 

Child, Samuel, 30 N. Gay street. 

Clark, M. corner of North and Franklii 
streets, 

Curlett, J. coach and harness maker, 
North, near Saratoga St. 

Force, D. C. corner of Fayette and Mc 
Clellan's st 

Maccnbhin, N. R., North street, next 
door to Gas Company's office. 

McC urley, James, 23 Liberty street; car- 
riages made and repaired at short no- 
tice, and on moderate terms. 

Selvage, William, coach and harness 
maker, Davis st., adjoining Owings' 
stables. 

Sommer, Jacob, S. W. corner of Howard 
and Lombard sts. 

Coal Dealers. 

Child, Wm. 88 Bowly's wharf. 

Fahuestock. P. & L. coal dealers. Yard, 
Spring Gardens, foot of Eutaw st. 

House, Samuel & Son, corner of Light 
street wharf and Barre st. 

McElderry. Henry, keeps constantly on 
hand a supply of the best anthracite 
coal, from the various mines, suitable 
for families and manufacturers. Also 
a quantity of Alleghany bituminous 
coal, which will be found a superior 
article. The location of his yard af- 
fords facilities to those wishing to ship 
a cargo, or less quantity. Apply at 
the office, 10 Lombard, near South st., 
— at Hugh McElderry's lumber yard. 
Light street wharf, (where samples 
may be examined,) or at the yard. 
West Falls avenue, mouth of Union 
Dock, where John McElderry is in 
constant attendance. 



Collectors and Property- 
Agents. 

Anderson, Robt. 11 Fayette st. 

Breman, T. B. cor. St. Paul and Fayette. 

Farquharson, Chas. 11 Fayette st. 

Gelbach, Geo., Baltimore Property and 
General Commission Agency, corner 
of North and Fayette streets, opposite 
the post office. 

Harrison, Z. C.,York, near William st. 

Tracy, J. cor. Fayette and St. Paul's sts. 

Combs and Fancy Goods. 

Boury, Joseph, 164 Baltimore St., im- 
porter of French, German, and English 
fancy goods, and toys of every de- 
scription, perfumeries, etc. etc. 

Brauns & Focke, importers of German 
goods, — dealers in combs, buttons, and 
iancy goods, 190 1-2 Baltimore St. 

Cutler, J. S. 69 Baltimore st. 

Diegs, John R. 15 west Baltimore st. 

Eytmge, S., S. Charles, near Baltimore 
street. 

Fickey <fc Poulson, importers of buttons 
and fancy goods, and wholesale deal- 
ers in combs, brushes, and looking 
glasses, 245 1-2 Baltimore st. 

Hennings, E. A. & Co. importers of 
German and French fancy goods, laces, 
hosiery, tapes, bindings, toys, etc., 
225 1-2 Baltimore st. 

Hoffmeister &, Co. importers and whole- 
sale dealers, 6 S. Liberty St., between 
Baltimore and German sts. 

Huptield & Schroeter, importers of Ger- 
man fancy goods, 199 Baltimore st. 
(up stairs.) 

Kemp, Henry, 5 N. Howard St. dealer 
in German fancy goods. 

Konig, T. & Co. N. Howard, near Bal- 
timore st. 

Lilly, Flack & Lentz, importers of Eng- 
lish, French,and German fancy goods, 
and manufacturers and dealers in 
combs, looking glasses, buttons,b rush- 
es, etc. etc. 232 Baltimore St. 

Mittnacht, G. H. & Co. 9 S. Liberty st. 
between Baltimore and German sts., 
importers of, and wholesale dealers in 
German, English, and French fancy 
goods, trimmings, stockings, zephyr 
worsted; all kinds of canvass, che- 
nilles, patterns, laces, cutlery, pistols, 
clocks, looking glasses and plates, 
musical instruments, combs, brushes, 
toys, etc. etc. 

Mortimer & Mowbray, 116 and 180 Bal- 
timore street, dealers in German fancy 
goods, etc. 

Russell. Thomas, late Gillingham & 
Russell, wholesale dealer in combs, 
buttons, German and fancy goods, em- 
bracing almost every description of 
small articles, 220 Baltimore st. 

Shreck, G. & J. 1 East Baltimore st, 



101: 



BALTIMORE BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



adjoining the bridge, tortoise shell and ' 
Brazilian comb manufacturers, and 
dealers in fancy goods. Citizens and 
country merchants will find the great- 
est variety in their line of busines, at 
moderate prices. Tortoise shell combs 
cut and altered to the latest fashion, 
and in the neatest manner and war- 
ranted to look as well as new 

Thierman, Henry, 6. N. Eutawst. im- 
porter of German and French fancy 
goods. 

Trust, Jacob, 2 N. Howard st. (opposite 
Wheatfield Inn, or Cockey 's Hotel,) 
importer and dealer in French, Eng- 
lish, and German fancy goods, cut- 
lery, jewelry, combs, buttons, brushes, 
baskets, looking glasses, clocks, etc. 

Willie, Chas. & Dickey, importers of 
German goods, 7 Hanover st. 

Commission Merchants. 

Batlee & Lowe, tobacco dealers, No. 13 
Light st. wharf. Advances made on 
consignments. 

Barnett, A. H. 90 Dugan'a wharf, has 
constantly on hand a general assort- 
mentofgroceries, at the lowest prices. 

Boggs, John & Co. 14 Spear's wharf. 

Bruudige, Jas. & Son, 93 Bowly's whf. 

Bui k & Herr, 8 Spear's wharf. 

Carvill, J. R. 12 Light st. wharf. 

Carson, T.J. 33 Cheapside. 

Child, Wm. commission merchant, and 
dealer in coal, 88 South st. 

Collins, G. C. 15 Light st. whf. 

Corner, J. I. & Bro., Maryland whf. 

Crookshanks.John, 6 Light st. whf. 

Etting, B. G. 36 south Gay st. 

Ferguson, Thomas, OS Bowly's wharf, 
sole agent for the sale of G. W. Wart's 
patent hydraulic cold pressed castor 
oil, pressed mustard, ground spices,etc 

Fisher, J. I. 7 Spear's wharf. 

Garland ,fc Elwell, 86 Bowlv's wharf. 

Gordon, J. R. & Co. 14 Bowly's whf. 

Griest, M. 21 Light st. whf. 

Harding, Walter E. 3 Bowlv's whf. 

Hazlehurst & Walters, 16 Spear's whf. 

Hause, O. P. 69 west Pratt st. 

Heald, Jacobs Co. com. merchants for 
the sale of tobacco, 44 south Gay st. 

Hooper, James & Sons, 16 Light st. whf. 

Hooper, Thomas, 5 Spear's whf. 

Jenkins, L. A. & Co. 46 Light street, 2 
doors below Lombard st. produce and 
commission merchants. 

Judah<ff Block, 5 Spear's wharf. 

Keys & Krems, 63 Calvert st. 

Keene, John H., temperance grocer and 
commission merchant, 1-2 Light st. whf. 

Levering, T. W. & L. 9 Pratt st. whf. 

Locke, t. M. 12 Light st. whf. 

Gill, James L. D. general commission, 
flour, produce, and forwarding mer- 
chants, 75 Bowly's whf. 

Macilroy, Thomas, 2 Light st. whf. 



Mister, Abraham, 14 Light st. whf. 

Moore, Win. 51 Smith's whf. 

Norman & Courtney, No. 49 south 
Gay street, tobacco commission mer- 
chants. 

Parkhurst & Nye, 84 Bowly's whf. 

Pike & Neale, 3 Light st. whf. 

Randall, John R. commission merchant, 
and agent for the Charleston and Sa- 
vannah line of packets. 104 Smith's wf. 

Reynolds, Wm. 38 N. Howard st. grocer 
and commission merchant. 

Robinson, J. & Son, 26 Light st wharf. 

Rutherford & Hurlburt, 11 Bowly's whf. 

Spencer, W. W. & Co. 5 Bowly's whf. 

Sullivan, J. & Son, 26 Light st. wharf. 

Taylor, J. S. S. 25 Light st. wharf. 

Thompson, Henry & Son, 41 S. Gay st. 

Trimble & Wilson, 77 S. Calvert st 

Waters & Hall, 11 Light st. wharf. 

Wergman & Levering, 67 Smith's wf. 

Whitridge, TI103. agent for the despatch 
line of packets to New York, and man- 
ufacturers' line for Boston, Nos. 12 
and 13 Bowly's wharf 

Williams, N. F. 14 Bowly's wharf. 

Wilson & Herr, 71 & 73 South st. 

Wood, Samuel, of Jas. 8 Light st. wf. 

Confectioners. 

Bridges, Wm. 225 Baltimore St. confec- 
tioner and fruit dealer. 

Butcher, Alexander, confectionary and 
ice cream establishment, No. 31 north 
Charles st. 4 doors above Lexington. 

Camp, James L. 25i Baltimore st. 

Dessin, Henry, 9 east Pratt st. 

Dieterlv, Christopher, 62 N. Gay st. 

Erney, V. L. & J. 118 N. Howard st. 
wholesale and retail dealers in fruit, 
and western manufacturers of confec- 
tionary, lemon syrup, jellies, etc. 

Garaud, Edward, wholesale and retail 
confectioner, fruit dealer and distiller, 
No. 78 Baltimore st. Keeps constant- 
ly on hand, all kinds of candies, sugar 
almonds, dried, preserved and crystal- 
ized, fruits, syrups, and cordials, of all 
qualities. Also, on hand, a good as- 
sortment of green and dried fruits, all 
kinds of meats, game, poultry, fish and 
vegetables preserved, and pickled, ex- 
cellent for sea use. 

Bonbons, avec gravures, Fleurs im- 
ite en Sucre, Ornements, gelee cris- 
tallisee, Pastilles a liqueur, gome Ar- 
abique, Pate de guimauve, de jujube, 
chocolat de sante, a la vanille, et au- 
tres quahtees Dragee superfine a tous 
les gouts, comfitures de France et des 
colonies. Trufl'es conserves par le 
steam, et autres Salaisons, Liqueurs 
d'ltalie, de Martinique et de Chine, 
etc. cartonage cornets evec une grande 
varietees, daus tout ce quil y a de plus 
nouveau, venaut de Paris. 



LT1M0RE BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Hagan.J. H.3 nortli Howard Bt whole 
sale and retail dealer in fruit, con fee 
tionary, lemon Byrup, jellies, etc. etc 

Irvm, Mrs. K. cor. St. Paul st. and Bank 
lane. 

Laconick, L. cor. Gough and Caroline 
streets. 

Price and Thurston, wholesale and re 
tail dealers in confectionary Ol 
own manufacture. Also, constantly 
on band, an i i ment of 

preserves, fruits, nuts, etc. at very re 
duced prices. No. 139 Iialtimorest.se 
cond door from Light Bt 

Reilly, John, 36 N. Howard st 3 doors 
from Fayette, wholesale and retail 
confectioner and fruit dealer. 

Raoaare, A. successor to T. McCarthy, 
corner of Baltimore and Frederick 
streets. 
Schwartz &, Rogers, manufacturers of 
confectionary, lemon syrup, etc. No. 
189 1-3 Baltimore st. 
Weaver, Levi, 4f> Pratt st. between 
Charles and Hanover sts. wholesale 
and retail dealer. 
Wild, Philip J. 43 Franklin st. 

Coopers. 

Cooney, P. Thames st. F. P. 
Espey, Wm. S. Fell st F. P. 
Gardner, Ephraim, 66 Pratt st. 
Grubb, G. cedar cooper, No. 1 Para st. 
Batter, Lewis F. No. 17 north Gay st, 

cedar cooper and wooden ware dealer. 
McCauley, D. Howard, between Pratt 

aod Lombard sts. 
Mott, D. Balderston, near Light st 
Wilson, Robert, York, east or Light st 
Pease, F. Cowpen al. above Liberty st. 

Copper Dealers. 

McKim, Win. & H. 4-2 S. Gay st. 

McKim, John, jr. &, Sons, manufactu- 
rers of sheet copper, corner of Pratt 
and Frederick sts. Dwellings, John 
McKim, jr., Holliday st. ; David T. 
McKim, Hollidayst.; John S. McKim, 
Monument at near Howard. 



Corsets, etc. 

Clermorns, Mad., Saratoga st. 4 doors 

of Charh-s — the only French 

t maker in Baltimore — keeps 

constantly on hand, and manufactures 

to order, French corsets, shoulder 

braces for both 3exes, etc. in the 

neatest and most fashionable style, 

_ and at the most reasonable prices. 

Cutler, J. S. 69 Baltimore st. corset 

trimmings, shoulder braces, Russian 

belts, gum webbing, etc. 

Counsellors. 

Addison, Wm. M. Fayette st 
Aim ks, T. P. Court House lane. 
Baker, Wm. G. 20 St. Paul's st. 
Belt, Geo. Gordon, Court House lane. 
Blackburn, John C, Court House lane. 
Boyd, C. Joseph, corner of Court House 

lane and Calvert st. 
Breck, Jos. cor. Lombard and South. 
Brice, Geo. H. Fayette st next St. Paul. 
Carrere, John, cor. Lexington and St. 

Cole. Wm. J .St. Paulst 
Collins, W. H. Court House lane. 
Dobbin, G. W. St. Paul st. 
Dulany, Grafton L. St. Paul st. 



Copper St u if lis, 

Dorry, E. G. plumber and coppersmith, 
25 Thames st. F. P. 

Kelley, James, 53 South st 

Smull, David B. coppersmith, tin and 
sheet iron worker, etc. 31 Pratt st. be- 
tween Gay and Commerce. 

West, Win. north east corner of Bank 
and Eden sts. copper refiner and lead 
smelterer. Constantly on hand and 
for sale, lead in piggs and bars, sein 
leads and deep sea leads, made to or- 
der, at the shortest notice. 

Cork Cutters. 

Chestnut, Samuel, No. 40 south Cal 
vert street. Residence, No. 51 Al 
bemarle street. 



*y 



Earnest, Geo. Court House lane. 

Emery, W. H. & D. C. Hopper, Fay- 
ette st. 

Famandis, W. jr. Lexington st. rear of 
Law Buildings. 

Glenn, John, Court House lane. 

Hanan, John, Fayette st 

Heushaw, A. G. Fayette, east St. Paul. 

Hinkley, Ed. 21 N. Charles St. 

Horl'man, David, South st. 

Johnson, Reverdy, Calvert st. 

Kendall, S. A. cor. Fayette and St Paul. 

Krebs, Wm. G., Fayette st. 

Latrobe, J. H. B. Calvert, near Fayette. 

Legrand, J. C. Fayette, east St. Paul. 

Lucas, Chas. Z. Post Office building. 

McMahon, J. V. L. Lexington st. 

Meredith, J. Calvert st. 

Moale, Samuel, Fayette st. 

Heal. Abner, Fayette st, east St. Paul. 

Nicols, C. Lexington, east of Charles. 

Pitts, C. H., Fayette st. op. Barnum's. 

Pitts, Win. Fayette St. op. Barnum's. 

Pre.-ton, Wm. P. 18 Fayette st. N. side. 

Purviance, Robert, jr. Frederick st. 

Read, W. G. St. Paul st. near Saratoga. 

Richardson, G. R. Court House lane. 

Ridgely , C. W. Court House lane ; dw. 
N. E. cor. Saratoga and Green sts. 

Ridgate, B. C. cor. Fayette and StJPauI. 

Ropes, A. Court House lane. 

Schley, W. cor. Lexington and St Paul. 

Scott, T. Parkin, St Paul st 

Spence, Carroll, Court House lane. 

Stewart, David, 20 St Paul st 

Stewart, Wm. P. 20 St Paul st. 



10G 



ALTIMORE BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



Steel, J. N. St. Paul st. 

Tagart, S. H. St. Paul st. 

Varnum, Joseph B. commissioner of 
deeds for Connecticut, Rhode Island, 
New Jersey and South Carolina, Fay- 
ette st opposite City Hotel. 

Warner. G. jr. Fayette st. \v. of Calvert. 

Walsh, T. Y. Court House lane. 

Wallis, S. T. Fayette st. west St. Paul. 

Williamson, G. W. cor. St. Paul and 
Fayette sts. 

Williams, N. Monument sq. 

Williar, G. H. Lexington st. rear of 
Law Buildings. 

Wolfe, A. B. Fayette, near Calvert st. 

Worthington, Ed. Fayette st. near Bar- 
num's Hotel. 

Curriers. 

Bleakely, Samuel H. 5 Water st. 
Canox, Joseph, cor. East and Ensorsts, 
Jenkins, Wm. & Sons, 4 Water st. 
Seyler, Frederick & Co. 24 S. Liberty 

st. Leather dealers and Curriers. 
Williar, Andrew, Lexington st. 3 doors 

east of Paca st. 

Cutlers. 

Daffin, Benjamin, old establishment for 

cutlery, 1 Holliday st. 
Jackson, .Samuel, 11 N.Liberty st. 
Reinbardt, Charles C. cutler and surgi 

cal instrument maker, 24 Lombard st 

Dentists. 

Briscoe, A. H. cor. Charles and Fayette, 

Brown, A. J. 7 Lexington st. 4 doors 
west of Charles, is prepared to insert 
artificial teeth, from one to an entire 
set, so as to avoid detection from the 
most scrutinizing observer; they will 
greatly improve mastication, and are 
adapted to the patient without pain 
and forever retain their color and pu< 
rity. They will be inserted, as well 
as all operations appertaining to den 
tal surgery, on terms lower than any 
in the city. 

Cassell, J. F. cor. Bait, and Liberty sts. 

Edmunds, T. H.55 Hanover st. 5 doors 
north of Pratt st. dental surgeon and 
manufacturer of silicious mineral, or, 
porcelain Teeth. He inserts such 
teeth, from one to a complete set, and 
performs all other dental operations, 

Hall, J. E. 41 South st. 

Harris, Dr. C. A. 53 Hanover st. 

Hay den, H. H. & Son, cor. Mulberry 
and Charles sts. 

Holmes, Asa, Lexington, stnear Calvert 

Holmes, O. Lexington st. op. C. House 

Laroque, Ed. 33 N. Charles st. 

Mark dl, Leonard, Lexington st. east of 
Charles. 

Noyes, Enoch, M.D. Fayette st. oppo- 
site Ilev. Mr. Duncan's church. 

Petheribridge, J. C. 13 E. Baltimore st. 



Pratt, Wm., W. Fayette st. opposite the 
City Hotel, one door from Monument 
square. Incorruptible mineral teeth 
inserted on gold plate singly or in 
whole sets, and every pains taken in 
their adjustment, to render them nat- 
ural in appearance and servicable in 
mastication. All operations for the 
regulation, and preservation of the 
natural teeth, and the health of the 
gums, both of adults and children, 
thoroughly and carefully conducted. 

Tilyard, H. W., Eutaw, 3 doors north of 
Lombard st. 

Wilcox, J. R. 39 Fayette st. near the 
post office. Artificial Teeth inserted 
in the most durable and natural man- 
ner. These teeth forever retain their 
color and purity, and exactly resem- 
ble sound human teeth. They are 
fitted to the mouth withont pain, and 
greatly improve mastication, utter- 
ance, and the general health. The 
excellence and durability of his work, 
as well as the invariable use of the 
best materials, has already rendered 
his mode of inserting teeth prover- 
bial. The terms are extremely mod- 
erate, and every information as to the 
proper method of inserting in each 
case, will be kindly and cheerfully 
given, without charge. 

Druggists. 

Baker, R.J. drugs, dye-stuffs, and paints, 
corner of Howard and Fayette sts. 

Ball & Garrettson, 22 Pratt st. 

Davis, J. W. & R. W. wholesale drug- 
gists, 254 Baltimore st. 

Emach, Wm. successor to Messrs. J. B. 
Fitzgerald & Co. 4 S. Liberty street, 
near Bait., wholesale dealer in drugs, 
paints, dye-stuffs, window glass, etc. 

Frey, E. & S. wholesale druggists, 251 
Baltimore st. 

Keerl, G. H. 233 Baltimore street, keeps 
constantly on hand a very extensive 
assortment of drugs, paints, dye-stuffs, 
druggists' glass, perfumery, etc. etc. 

Ober, G. & Co. successors to P. S. 
Chappell, 3 N. Charles st. 

Stabler & Canby, importers, Pratt street 
wharf, 2d door west from Calvert st. 

Dry Goods. 

Importers and Wholesale Dealers. 

Albers & Co. importers of German dry 
goods, 2 German st 

Armstrong, Harris & Co. dealers in fo- 
reign and domestic dry goods, 183 Bal- 
timore street, between Charles and 
Hanover sts. 

Baltzell, T. & P. 280 Baltimore st. 

Bowly & Falconer, foreign and domestic 
dry goods, 198 Baltimore st. 

Brown & Muncaster, dealers in British, 
French, and domestic dry goods, 117 



BALTIMORE BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



107 



Baltimore st. between Charles and 
Howard, sts. 

Brooks, Towner & Tibbals,256 Balt.st. 

Brown, Robt. P. 9 German st. 

Browne & Owens, dealers in foreign and 
domestic dry goods, 225 1-2 Baltimore- 
street. 

Carroll, Win. straw bonnets and trim- 
mings, French, silk and lace millinery 
B -It. hi ire st 

Cole & Howard, foreign and domestic 
dry goods, 245 Baltimore st. 

Dammann, F. W. importer of German 
goods, 7 S. Charles st. (u]> 
Burlaps, Tecklenburgs, cotton hosiery, 
and handerchiefs, tumblers, etc. etc. 

Davidson & Sanders, wholesale i 
in foreign and domestic dry go 
Baltimore st. 

Decker & Gerdes, 59 Lombard st. com- 
mission merchants for the sale of dry 
goods. 

Easter, Brother & Co. wholesale dealers 
in British, French, and American sta- 
ple and fancy dry goods, 181 Bait. st. 

Gaither, Matthews & Quids', dealers in 
foreign and domestic dry goods, 203 
Baltimore st. 

Gardner, B. F. 238 Baltimore st. 

Gosnell & Devries, dealers in foreign 
and staple dry goods, 264 Baltimore 
St., X. W. corner of Howard st. 

Hack A: Ruthraurt", dealers in staple and 
fancy dry goods, 276 Baltimore st. 

Hambleton & Dunham, 225 Baltimore 
St. between Liberty and Howard. 

Harrison <fc Co. commission merchants 
for the sale of dry goods, cor. Charles 
and German streets. 

Hartzog <fc Robinson, dealers in British, 
French, and domestic dry good <, NY>. 
244 12 Baltimore street, near Liberty. 

Henry, Win. commission merchant for 
the sale of dry goods, 14 S. Charles st. 

Hoft'meister & Co. importers of German 
cotton and woollen hosiery and gloves, 
woollen and silk shawls, trimmings, 
laces, threads, German and French 
fancy goods, musical instruments, 
looking glasses, hardware, toys, etc. 
etc.6S. Liberty st. between Baltimore 
and German sts. 

Hoffman, G. B. & Bros. 18 S. Charles st 

Imbrie & Farnum, commission mer- 
chants for the sale of foreign and do- 
mestic dry goods, 16 German st. 

Inloes, J. S. & Co. staple and fancy 
dry goods, 188 Baltimore st. 

Janney, Hopkins &, Hull, importers and 
wholesale dealers, 202 Baltimore 3t. 

Kroesen, A. 257 Baltimore st. 

Marye, G. T. & Co. wholesale dry goods 
merchants, 239 Baltimore st. 

Meredith & Co. 246 Baltimore st 

Murdoch, W. F. & A. & Co. importers 
of dry goods, 8 S. Charles st. 

Riggs Sl Co. 7 German st. 



Pendleton, Long & Riely, dealers in fo- 
reign and domestic dry go' 



-t. 



Rodewald, F. & Didier, commission 
merchants for the sale ol French and 
German dry goods, 16 German st. 

Sangston, J. A. <fc G. E. & Co. dealers 
in foreign and domestic dry g'v 
Baltimore street, between Hanover 
and sharp sts., keep constantly on 
hand a large supply of goods, "pur- 
chased principally at auction, which 
they are determined to sell on the 
most reasonable terms. 

ij. Whiteley & Co. 175 Bait st. 

Slingluff & Stevenson, dealers in foreign 
and domestic dry goods, N. E. corner 
of Baltimore and Howard sts. 

Todhunter. Jos. <Sr Co. importers and 
commission merchants, 10 German st. 

Wetherall & HolTman, wholesale and 
retail dealers in foreign and domestic 
dry goods, 240 Baltimore st. 

Wilkins & Wonn, dealers in foreign and 
domestic dry goods, 193 Baltimore st 
4 doors west of Hanover. 

Williamson, Chas. A. 12 S. Charles St.; 
dw. 62 north Charles st. 

Domestic Dry Goods. 

Brady, E. F. commission merchant for 
the sale of cotton yarn and domestic 
goods, corner of Baltimore and Hano- 
ver sts. 

Duvall, Keighler & Co. (successors to 
Tiffany, Duvall &, Co.) agents for the 
sale of domestic cotton and woollen 
goods, No. 199 1-2 Baltimore street. 
Dwellings, J. H. Duvall, Charles st. 
north of Hamdton; W. H. Keishler, 
54 north Charles st; Wm. B. Duvall, 
corner of Howard and Monument sts. 

Ford & Stannard, 242 Baltimore st. 

Jones, Woodward & Co. agents for the 
sale of domestic cotton and wool- 
len goods, 197 Baltimore street, be- 
tween Sharp and Hanover sts. Dwel- 
lings, A. D. Jones, Eutaw st. south of 
Lombard; W. Woodward, Eutaw, be- 
tween Saratoga and Mulberry sts. 

Mayhew, Wm. E. &, Co. commission 
merchants, for the sale of domestic 
goods, Nos. 1 and 3 German st. 

Tiffany, Ward & Co. commission mer- 
chants, for the sale of domestic goods, 
corner of Hanover and German sts. 

Tiffany, O. C. &. Co. wholesale dealers 
in domestic goods, 205 Baltimore st. 

Dry Goods. 

Wholesale and Retail. 

Allen, G. N". 81 Baltimore st silk and 
fancy dry goods, cheap for cash, from 
the Philadelphia and New York auc- 
tions. 

Armstrong, Thomas, 157 Baltimore st. 



10S 



BALTIMORE BUSINESS D1EECTORV. 



Bevan, Joseph, 56 N. Gay st. one door 

N. of Exetei L 
Bird, Edward .). dealer in fancy and 

staple il r> -mids, S'.l li tltnnore st. 
Brown, G. & Sons, 97 Baltimore St. 
Brown, W. L18N. High St. (). T. 

Buckey and Uuvall, wholesale and retail 
dealers in fancy and domestic dry 
goods, 109 1-2 Baltimore st. between 
C.ih i-i t and South st.. 

Cobnrn, James, 151 Baltimore St. 

Dirienderfter, H. .v Co. wholesale and 
retail dealers in French, Italian, and 
India silk goods, 4:5 Baltimore st 

Dorsey & Nelson, L3 Baltimore street, 
3 doors west of Market space. 

Drydren and Brother, 25 Baltimore st. 
keep constantly on hand a general 
assortment of staple and iiuicy dry 
goods, wholesale and retail- 
Easter, Hamilton 4- Co. 157 12 Bait. st. 

Easter, John, 33 Pratt st. 4 doors west 
of Hanover st south side. 

Estes, E. B.<y Ryan, 1533-4 Bait. st. 

Farnandis and Co. foreign and domestic 
dry goods, 141 Baltimore st. 

Fenby, T. 42 N-Gay st. 

Gould, Mrs. Lydia A. west Baltimore 
st. eastol'Cove,— dry goods, fancy and 
variety store- 

Guyton and Hyde, 58 Hanover st. 

Greensl'elder, B. dealer in fancy dry 
goods, 35 Baltimore -t. 

Hayward, Ely B., S. E. corner of Gay 
and Front sts. O. T. 

Harrison, John, wholesale and retail 
dealer in foreign and domestic dry- 
goods, 121 Baltimore st. 

Harvey, J- & Co. dealers in foreign 
and domestic dry goods, N. W. cor- 
Pratt and Howard sts. 

Heron, Alexander & Son, cor. of Bal- 
timore st. and Centre Market space. 

Hirsch, Preiss, &, M. Cohen, dealers in 
British, French, German and Ameri- 
can dry goods, 17 Baltimore st. 

Holt, A. 60 1-2 Lexington st. Fancy- 
articles, silks, etc. very low. 

Hopkins, Wm. M. 101 Baltimore st. 

Horn, J- 59 N. Howard st. 

Huppmann. Nicholas, 13 N. Howard st. 
Importer of German dry goods. 

Jackson, James, 10 Baltimore st. 

Kennard, Geo. I. dealer in foreign and 
domestic dry goods, No. 125 Balti 
mote street. 

Lankford, Mrs. M. A. fancy dry goods, 
51 1 -2 Baltimore st. 

Lauer, Lewis. 4 E. Baltimore st. be 
tween Front and High sts. Auction 
goods, wholesale and retail. 

Leas, Charles A. 55 Baltimore st. 

Lee, Wm. fancy dry goods, bonnets, 
etc. 79 Baltimore st. 

Leeke, Rich., cor. Hanover and Pratt. 

Leche, David, 9 north Charles st. Im 
porter of and wholesale and retail 



dealer in British and French dry 
goods. 
Lewis & Leveling, cloth, silk and shawl 
store, dealers in foreign and domestic 
fancy and staple dry goods, wholesale 
and retal, 161 Baltimore Bt between 
Ch irlesand Light sts. An tion cloths 

and ('assimeres, at a small advance, 
or to punctual customers at the usual 
credit. 

1,'iin-i, William, cor. Gay and High sts. 
Country tow and flax, linen and lind- 
sev always bought at market prices. 

McConnell, Tlios. 29 Baltimore st. 

McEldowney, Robert & Co. 36 Centre 

M irk el 

Miller, E. * Co. S. E. corner of Lom- 
bard and Hanover sts. 

Murdoch, J. H. 11 Baltimore st. 

Needles, John, 54 Hanover st. 

Osborn, Wm. Mc Kinney, 56 Hanover. 

I'assano, L No. 40 12 Centre Market 
space, dealer in foreign and domestic 
dry goods. 

Powell, C. R. & Co. 6 C. Market space. 

Read & Craig, 18 Centre Market space. 
Foreign and domestic dry soods. 

Richardson, Edward J., 39 Baltimore 
st. has now opened a general assort- 
ment of fresh goods which will be 
sold low for cash. 

Richardson, John W- 23 Baltimore st. 
De iler in imported dry goods. 

Richardson, Beale H. 165 Baltimore st. 

Roche, John A. 61 Baltimore st. 

Royston, John W 41 Baltimore st. In 
store a full assortment of imported 
and domestic dry good, cloths, cassi- 
meres, etc. 

Royston, Joshua, staple and fancy dry 
goods, 57 Baltimore st. 

Rosenstock, G Market st F.P. 

Russell, J. and S. No. 12 Centre Market 
space, dealers in foreign and domestic 
div goods. 

Street, John C. 21 Baltimore st. 

Smith, A. K. cor Gay and Front sts. 

Taylor, John, 48 N. Howard st. 

Toldridge, B. 123 Baltimore st. dealer 
in fashionable dty goods. 

Wilmot, John, G. 1(17 Baltimore st. 

Wright, B. C. 77 Baltimore st. 

Dyers. 

Balbirnie, Geo. silk dyer, 4 Front st. 

Bond, James, 95 west Pratt st. cloth 
drssing and dying establishment. 

Fisher, Thomas, 10 S. Calvert st. 

Guerand, F. from Paris, dying and scour- 
ing establishment, No. 102 north How- 
ard st. dyes and finishes all kinds of 
woollen, silk and cotton goods to any 
color. Also, cleanses and removes 
stains on merino and silk dresses, coats, 
carpets, table covers, gause veils, etc. 
Merino, cashmere, crape and silk 
shawls, cleansed to equal new. 



BALTIMORE BUSINES 



RE C TORY. 



109 



Hulse, J. cor. Holhday and Saratoga sts 

Martin, John, 37 S. Charles st. 

Perkins, Henry, 20 S. Calvert st. 

Williams, Chas. S. (successor to John 
Townsend.) N. W. corner of Nortl: 
and Franklin sts. 

Williams, James R. & Sons, dying es 
tabUehment, south Charles st. near 
Lombard, silk, woollen and cotton 
goods of every description, dyed and 
bushed at, this establishment at the 
shortest notice, such as cloths, cassi- 
mers, merinos, etc. Ladie3 dresses, 
shawls and bonnets, re-colored and 
finished to equal in appearance, new 
articles. Merino cloaks and mat 
las cleansed or re-dyed, and straw or 
leghorn bonnets bleached or dyed to 
order. Gentlemens wearing apparel 
cleansed or re-dyed, and handsomely 
pressed so as to resemble new clothes. 
Domestic or American sewing silk 
ungummed, and dyed of every colorto 
equal tin- best Italian in lustre, bril- 
liancy of color and permanency of 
dye. The constant personal attention 
of the proprietors is given to every 
department of the establishment, in 
view of maintaining its well known 
credit for excellency of workmanship 
and punctuality of engagement. 

Engineer. 

Roche, George F. de la ; dwelling, 
corner of North and Spring streets- 
office in the basement. 

Engine Hose. 

Dukehart, William, 3 Balderston, near 
Light street, engine hose manufac- 
turer. Dwelling, High st. near French. 



Engravers. 



Anderson, James M. 53 Baltimore st. 
(up stairs.) 

Bannennan, Wm. W. historical and ge 
neral engraver, and copperplate print- 
er. 1 St. Paul st. 

Brown, M. S. 30 Fayette st. 

Medairy, John, bank note and general 
engraver, and copperplate printer, 136 
Baltimore St. (up stairs.) 

Horton, J. S. cor. Baltimore and South. 

Simpson, Jos., lapidary seal engraver, 
Fayette st. opposite Assemby Rooms. 

Feather Beds, etc. 

Hodges, B. O. <f Co. Bedding Mart, 
N. W. and S. W. corners of Lombard 
and Light streets; constantly on hand 
an extensive assortmnnt of every de- 
scription of goods in their line. 

Feed Stores. 

Martin, Jas. <y Wm. 6 Pratt st whf. 
Saumenig, Henry, Lombard, between 
Hanover and Charles sts. 



Saumenig, J., Howard, near Pratt st. 
Turner, J. J. 58 N. Gay street. 
Walmsly, J. G., Pennsylvania avenue, 

next to Black Horse tavern. 
Wilson, C. E. cor. Hillen and Exeter. 

Files. 

Greenwood, Wm. south Paca, between 
Lombard and Pratt streets, manufac- 
tures and keeps constantly on hand, 
ami for sale, wholesale and retail, a 
general assortment of tiles. Old files 
recut i.i the best manner, at short 
notice, and on reasonable terms. 



Finding Stores. 

Ault, Samuel <f Son, wholesale deal- 
ers, corner of Calvert and Water sts. 

Larrabee, Ephraim, importer and dealer 
in shoe threads, and findings in ge- 
neral, 30 and 34 S. Calvert st. 

Maxwell, A. 78 Ensor st. O. T. 

Vanlill, H. M. HOW. Pratt st. 

Flour Dealers. 

Black, T. and Co. 30 N. Howard st. 

Kemp and Poole, corner Baltimore and 
Paca sts. 

Meixseli <?■ Stonebraker, 88 Pratt st. 

Saumenig, Henry, Lombard, between 
Hanover and Charles st. 

Wilson, Charles E., N. W. cor. Hillen 
and Exeter streets, O. T. 

Wysham, E. C. corner of Paca and Bal- 
timore sts. 

Forwarding and Com- 
mission Merchants. 

Elder, Gel-ton & Co. 10 X. Eutaw st 

Hailman, Burbridge &. Co. wholesale 
grocers, forwarding and commission 
merchants, Baltimore st. one door 
east of Paca. 

Gill, J. L. D. general commission, flour, 
produce and forwarding merchant 

O'Conner, James & Co. Portable Car 
Body Line, carrying freight to Pitts- 
burg without transhipment Ware- 
house, 68 North st. 

Taylor. J. & Son, wholesale grocers, for 
warding and commission merchants, 
corner Eutaw and German sts. 

Wilson, James, 117 N. Howard st. agent 
for Bingham's Line of Transportation 
to the West, via Baltimore and Sus- 
quehannah Rail Road and Pennsyl- 
vania canal. Depot, 123 N. Howard 
street 

Fruit Dealers. 

Garraud, Edward, wholesale and retail 
fruit dealer and confectioner, 78 Bal- 
timore st. 

Kidd & White, fruit dealers and con- 
fectioners, Bait. st. near the bridge. 

Schwartz and Rogers, wholesale and re- 



110 BALTIMORE BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

Gold Beater. 

Leach, Win. Baltimore gold and silver 
leaf manufactory, 69 1-2 Baltimore st. 
respectfully informs the consumers of 
gold and silver leaf, that he still con- 
tinues to manufacture gold leaf, and 
dentists' gold foil of the best quality ; 
also, gold and silver bronze, gold plate 
and wire, for dentists ; also Stockton's 
best teeth, with dentists' files— all at 
the lowest prices for cash. 

Grain Dealers. 

Cox, Luther J. 75 Calvert st. ; residence, 
Paca, north of Lexington st. 

Fenby, A. M. & Co. corner of Cheap- 
side and Pratt st. 

Fenby, S. & Bro. cor. Gay and Pratt sts. 

Sheppard and Martin, grain, produce, 
and commission merchants, 4 Light 
st. wharf. 

Turner, J. J. <$• S. 30 Pratt st head of 
Frederick st. dock. 

Grocers, 

Wholesale and Retail. 

Adams, J. P. 7 Bowly's wharf. 

Alden, S. tea dealer and grocer, cor. of 
Fish and Centre Market spaces. 

Amos, J. J. coi. of Gay and Potter sts. 

Apph-garth & Faulkner, 9-2 Dugan's wf. 

Atkinson, Joshua 22 Market st. F. P. 

Auld, H. Eutaw st. 2 doors W. Lexing- 
ton market. 

Bartow & Pendergast, grocers and com- 
mission merchants, No. 91 Smith's wf. 

Beatty, Wm. & Co. cor. South and Pratt. 

Bliss & Caldwell, grocers and com- 
mission merchants, No. 254 12 Balti- 
more st. 

Bourke, Edward, 84 Dugan's wharf. 

Bush, D. & Co. grocers and flour dea- 
ler;, 3 Franklin st. 

Caughy, B. <$• P. grocers and produce 
merchants, 4 Pennsylvania avenue. 

Chestnut, Wm. grocer and commission 
merchant, 80 Pratt st. near Cheapside. 

Clark, James, 17 Alice Ann st. F.P. 

Cook <f Harris, 36 German st 

Coleman, Morgan, grocer and produce 
dealer, 305 W. Baltimore st 

Corner, B. M. & Co. 3 Maryland whf. [ 

Crawford, Wm. jr. 6 Bowly's whf. 

Denison, Marcus, 31 Baltimore street, 
keeps constantly for sale a choice as- 
sortment of teas, wines, spices, and 
groceries generally ; dw. S. Gay st 

Emory & Stephens, 2 Bowly's whf. 

Ennis, A. W., No. 55, foot of Light st 
whf. keeps constantly on hand a large 
and superior assortment of groceries, 
which are offered to city or country 
trade on pleasing terms. 

Evatt, C. cor. Camden and Howard sts. 

Flack, Wm. M., produce and groceries, 
cor. of Franklin and Paca sts. 



tail dealers in fruit, 189 1-2 Baltimore 
street 
Price <f Thurston, fruit dealers and 
confectioners, wholesale and retail 
139 Baltimore st. 2d door from Light 
street, where they keep constantly on 
hand a large assortment of fruits, nuts, 
and preserves ; also an extensive stock 
of confectionary of their own manu- 
facture—all which are offered at re- 
duced prices. 

Furniture Dealers. 

Eytinge, S., S. Charles, near Baltimore. 
Gardner, Wm. 3 Marsh Market space. 
Magee, John, dealer in new and second 

hand furniture, Eutaw, 3 doors south 

of Saratoga st. 
Osbourn, Wm. O., Second street, near 

Marsh Market space. 
Shannon, Win., N. E. corner of Second 

and Frederick sts. 

Fur Dealers. 

Cox, Joseph & Sons, 2 S. Liberty st. 
importers of hatters' furs, trimmings, 
dye-stuff's, shellac, etc. The highest 
price paid, at all times, for shipping 
furs. 

Pearson, Joseph <f Sons, 260 Baltimore 
st importers of furs and hatters' 
trimmings, and every article apper- 
taining to the manufacture of hats. 

Salzwedel, J. f.j Sharp, near Baltimore 
street. 

Furnishing Stores. 

Gentlemens. 
Alexander, Wm. 3 Sharp st. near Balti- 
more, keeps for sale stocks, collars, 
bosoms, shirts, Gentlemens dressing 
gowns, shoulder braces, stock frames, 
etc. etc. 
Cave, Mrs. A. C. stock manufacturer 
and ready made linen store, 145 Balti 
more st. 
Danskin, W. A. 113 Baltimore st. 
Fritz, G. H., Thames st. W. of Bond, 
Kimberly, N., Thames st. W. of Bond, 
Presstman, G. Thames st W. of Bond 
Tennant, T. 3 South st. manufacturer of 
stocks, shoulder braces, buck sk 
shirts and drawers, suspenders, shirt 
collars, cravat stiffners, surgical ban- 
dages, etc. etc. 
Warren, Henry, 4 North, near Bait. St. 
Winchester, O. F. 165 1-2 Baltimore st 
Young, Miss E. C. 2 1-2 Holliday st. 

Glass Manufacture!'. 

Baker, Wm. Baltimore window glass 
manufactory, 3 N. Liberty st. whole- 
sale dealer in coach and window glass, 
glass shades, etc. etc. of a superior 
quality. 



ALTIMORE BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 



111 



Friend, A , cor. N. Charles and Barnet. 

Gillme\er, F. R. produce and groceries, 
15 Pennsylvania avenue. 

Girvin, James, commission merchant, 
and dealer in produce, cor. of Frank- 
lin and Eutaw sts. 

Gregg, Andrew & Co. grocers and pro- 
duce dealers, 18 Franklin street 

Greves, David & Son, 1 Market at F.P. 

Hampson, A. J. St. Paul st 

Herring, B. W. cor. Gough and Spring. 

Holbrook, P. M., S. E. cor. Gay st and 
Bel Air market, has in store, and in- 
tends keeping constantly on hand a 
good assortment of groceries, which 
he will dispose of on the most accom- 
modating terms. Dr. Brandnth's cel- 
ebrated Vegetable Pills for sale as 
above. 

Hough, Hupp<f Co. 1 Pratt st. whf. 

Humes, Thomas, dealer in produce and 
liquors, cor. High and Hillen sts. O.T. 

Hutton, G. M.,tea, wine, and grocery 
store, 24 Baltimore st. 

Jacobs <$- Alexander, cor. Lexington and 
Liberty sts. 

Juris, Joseph <f Son, flour and grocery- 
store, 5 Franklin st 

Jerome, J. H. T. cor. Lexington and 
Paca sts. 

Keys, H. C. <f Co. Cheapside, near Pratt 

Klockgether, D. 104, N. Howard st li- 
quor and grocery store. 

Landstreet, John <f- Son, irrocers and 
commission merchants, south How- 
ard street. 

Lockington, J. 20 Cheapside. 

Martin <y- Valletta, tea dealers and gro- 
cers, 66 Baltimore st. 

Bfaufeby, D. L. 110 N. High st. O.T. 

McClain, John A. cor. of Lexington and 
Sharp sts. 

McFaul, E. <f Co. 9 and 11 Pennsylva- 
nia avenue, produce and groceries. 

McKunna, P. <£ Co. wholesale and retail 
dealers, Pratt st. W.of Paca. 

McKew, P. tea dealer and grocer in 
general, 103 High st. O.T. 

Meares, J. B. cor. High and Pratt sts. 

Mitchell, Ed. grocer and commission 
merchant, 5 Dugan's whf. 

Moore, Robert, grocer and fruit dealer, 
61 Centre Market space. 

Moxley, Lloyd, 17 Pennsylvania ave- 
nue, groceries and feed. 

Norris, Wm. B. grocer and commission 
merchant, 256 Baltimore st 

Nugent, Wm. dealer in produce and 
groceries, 74 Franklin st. 

Peters, John Jacob, cor. of Charles and 
Balderston st. 

Pierce, D. M. cor. Gay and Frederick 
sts. prepares and keeps constantly on 
hand and for sale a very superior arti- 
cle of Stomach Bitters, which invari- 
ably prove a certain remedy for all 
bilious diseases. 



Randall, John, cor. Camden and Hano- 
ver sts. 
Raiiiv, John G. 26 E. Baltimore St. 
Reese, Daniel G. flour and groceries, 
Pennsylvania avenue, bet. George and 
Biddle sts. 
Reese, John, flour and groceries, 62 N. 
I Howard st 

Rieman, Wm. J. dealer in bacon and 
I groceries, N. W. corner of Eutaw and 
I Lexington sts. 
Roloson, Fred, bacon, provision, flour, 
feed, and groceries, cor. of Pennsyl- 
vania av. and St Mary's st 

D -teel, Joseph W. 28 Franklin St. 
I grocer and vinegar dealer. 
i Ross, Chas. H. grocer and commission 
| merchant, 9 Dugan's whf. 
, Sanders, B. J. and E. J. wholesale gro- 
cers, corner of Frederick street and 
J Smith's allev. 
Scarff, Wm., 112 north High st 
Simmonds, J. A. 46 Light st. 
Stansbury <f Brummel, 13 Pennsylva- 
| nia avenue, distillers, and produce 
| merchants. 
Stewart, Robt. 6 Forest st. grocer and 
| produce dealer. 
Stilley, J. cor. Pratt and Presidentsts. 
Swain, W. cor. Gay and Potter sts. O.T. 
Van Ness, W. I. 48 Marsh Market space, 
wholesale and retail grocer, constantly 
on hand an extensive assortment of 
groceries, selected with care for fami- 
ly use; wooden ware, baskets and 
brooms, at wholesale and retail. The 
money refunded for any goods that 
may not suit the purchaser. 
Whiteford, David, 272 Baltimore st. 
White, S. K. cor Fayette and Howard. 
Wilson, John <?• Son, 6 Baltimore St., 
I dealers in groceries, wines and liquors 
j generally. 

Wilson, Wm. 16 Franklin st. grocer and 
' flour dealer. 
Wilson, James, 117 N. Howard street, 
! grocer and produce merchant 
Winn <f Co. Franklin, below Paca St. 
I produce and groceries. 
Wood, O. 16 Market st F. P. 
Young <$• Jontz, 78 Franklin st. whole- 
sale and retail grocers and produce 
dealers. 

Gun Smiths. 

Cromwell, L. Thames st. F. P. 

Evatt, Columbus, bell hanger, lock and 

gun smith, 56 Light st. 
Evatt, Mrs. Ellen, Water st opposite 

the head of Cheapside. 
Keene, John, 8 Water st. 
Merrill, Jas. H. 59 South st. gun, rifle, 

and pistol manufacturer. 

Hair Dressers. 

Brown, A., S. E. cor. Charles and Pratt 
Brown, H. H. 16 Holliday st. 



113 



BALTIMORE BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Caldwell, H. C, N. Gay st. next door 

to the town clock. 
Cromwell, G. cor. Eden and Baltimore. 
Davis, Richard, 40 Pratt st. 
Hammer, J. 28 N. Howard st. 
Jakes, Henry, 2 Bank lane. 
Jakes, James, 16 1-2 South st. 
Morgan, Wm. 2 S. Gay st. 
Rock, Henry, 11 North st. 

Hair Work. 

Croyeau, Augustin, No.149 Baltimore st. 
above Light, hair dresser and perfu- 
mer, and importer of French anu Eng- 
lish fancy goods. 

Devouges, A. hair cutter, (from Paris,) 
and importer of flowers, perfumeries, 
fleur brushes, hair work, and French 
fancy goods, 99 Baltimore st. 

Hammer, J. wig maker and hair dresser, 
28 N. Howard st. 

Hardware Dealers. 

Albert, Jacob <f Co. importers, 271 1-2 
Baltimore st. 

Armistead <f- Manning, importers and 
dealers in hardware, cutlery, edge 
tools, saddlery, guns, rifles, etc. 171 1-2 
Baltimore st. a few doors west of 
Charles st. 

Audoun, Lewis, 41 Thames st. F.P 

Balderston, J. P. 19 N. Howard st. 

Browning, Wm. S. dealer in hardware, 
cutlery, etc. west Pratt st near Paca. 

Cappeau & Uhler, com. merchants, and 
manufacturers' agents for the sale of 
American hardware, 20 German st. be 
tween Hanover and Sharp. 

Diffenderner, J. A. 23 Baltimore st. 

Evatt, C. 56 Light st. dealer in all kinds 
of hardware on reasonable terms. 

Evatt, Mrs. E. Water st. opposite Cheap 
side, dealer in every description of 
hardware, at very low prices — cash 
paid for all kinds of old metals. 

Faithful, W. E. B. 5 Pennsylvania av 

Foy, James, 68 1-2 S. Calvert st. 

Friedenwald, J. $ Co. Bond st. F. P. 

Gillingham <f Jessup, corner of Light 
and Pratt sts, 

Greenfield, A. H. 76 Lexington st. one 
door E. of Eutaw, keeps a general as. 
sortment of hardware, which he will 
sell cheap for cash. On hand, gene- 
rally, some goods at reduced prices. 

Hoffmeister & Co, importers and whole- 
sale dealers. 6 S. Liberty st. 

Ludden, Lemuel, importer and whole- 
sale dealer in hardware, 221 Balti- 
more st. 

Norris <$■ Bro. importers of hardware, 
216 Baltimore st. 

Pike <f Ward, 21 Calvert st. 

Plummer <$- King, wholesale, dealers N. 
W. corner Baltimore and Liberty sts. 

Powles, H., N. W. corner of Howard 
and Saratoga sts. 



Proctor, Wm. 4 Pratt st head of the 
basin, wholesale and retail dealer. 

Rigden, John E., Hanover st 3 doors 
south of German, wholesale dealer. 

Spilman, James, 3 Gay st. bridge. 

Stickney <f- Noyes, 20 and 22 S. Charles 
st. commission merchants for the sale 
of nails, pig iron, iron wire, Ameri- 
can hardware, etc. 

Thomas * Co. importers of, and dealers 
in hardware, saddlery, cutlery, etc. 
etc. 196 Baltimore st. 

Turner, R. T. 6 Pratt st. 4 doors west 
of Light, importers of hardware. 

Voss, F. ■$ R. «f Co. 10 S. Charles st. 
importers and wholesale dealers. 

Zimmerman, B. F. 21 Franklin st. dealer 
in foreign and domestic hardware. 

Hats, Caps, Furs, etc. 

Abbes, John, furrier and cap maker, 102 
Baltimore st. 

Boston <f Price, 1 South st hats, caps, 
and furs. 

Boston, Jacob, 8 S. Calvert st 

Burns, M. 32 Centre Market space. 

Clark, Geo. 44 N. Howard st 

Cogswell, James, 94 Harrison st 

T)e Goey, Wm. 22 1-2 Centre Market 
space, fashionable hat and cap manu- 
facturer. 

Dryden & Gorsuch, 80 Pratt st between 
South and Commerce. 

Hickson, J. fashionable hat maker, 126 
Baltimore st. (Museum Building.) 

Hickley, R I. 42 N. Howard st. 

Hurtt, H. N., Pratt st. 1 door from Mar- 
ket space, fashionable and practical 
hat and cap manufacturer. 

Keevil, 66 1-2 Baltimore st. a few doors 
below Holliday, and exactly opposite 
Tripolet's alley. Facts ! facts ! facts! 
Keevil's cheap hats triumphant ! — 
Who has the hardihood to deny that 
Keevil sells a greater quantity of one 
priced hats than any other in Balti 
more? Such is the case — for people, 
one and all, are beginning to open 
their eyes, and act wisely, by purcha- 
sing of the one priced Keevil. His 
splendid hats are sold at the following 
prices :— He will sell a $5 Russia hat 
for, remember, $3,50; he will sella 
$4 silk hat, remember, for $2,50; he 
will sell a $5 or $6 Nutria beaver hat, 
bear in mind, for only $4; and last, 
though not least of all, don't forget 
that any person having purchased a 
hat at his store, which should prove, 
on examination, not to be exactly and 
precisely as good as represented by 
the seller, the purchase money thereof 
shall be refunded, on the hat being 
returned within the space of one week 
from the sale. So come, one and all, 
to the anti-humbug store. 
Leamy, P. <J Sons, 27 Thames st. F. P. 



ALTIMORE BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



113 



Pierce, Stepen A. 10 Market space, man 
ufacturer of gentlemens hats, and la 
dies beaver bonnets. 

Quail, George K. 56 Pratt st. a few doors 
above Hanover. 

Ridgaway, S. C. 24 N. Eutaw st. 

RieFsnider, L. S. 26 N. Howard st hat 
and cap manufacturer. 

Sappington, Frederick, 48 1-2 Baltimore 
street, near Gay, keeps constantly on 
hand, and manufactures at the short- 
est notice, all kinds of modern silk 
and fur hats, caps, etc. 

Sirata, V. cor. Baltimore and Eutaw sts. 

Towson, C. is selling in Eutaw st. one 
door north of Lexington, his splendid 
hats at the following very low prices: 
brush hats, 83,00; moleskin, with fur 
bodies, $2,50 ; and napped hats, from 
$1,50 upwards — all of the latest pat- 
terns, and of good materials, not sur- 
passed, if equalled, for the price, in 
the city. The trade supplied with hats 
in the rough. 

Vansant, Joshua, fashionable hat and 
cap emporium, S. W. corner of Balti- 
more and South sts. 

Wright & Howard, 158 Baltimore st 
wholesale and retail dealers. 

Hides and Leather. 

Birely, V., Cheapside. L. A. Birely, 
agent— Dwelling, 19 W. Pratt st. 

Crane, W. & Co. cor. Cheapside and 
Lombard st 

Deford, B. & Co. corner of Calvert and 
Lombard sts. 

Pasquay, Jacob, 16 Cheapside. 

Krebs.Geo. W. 52 S. Calvert st 

Horse Shoers. 

Chester, Wm. Pleasant st. near North. 
Reynolds, J. Balderston st near Light. 

Hosiery and Gloves. 

Bickley, C. 9 Baltimore et 

Cutler, J. S. 69 Baltimore st. 

Fischer, Charles & Co. importers and 
wholesale dealers in hosiery, gloves, 
laces, etc. 274 Baltimore st. 

Hoffmeister & Co. 6 S. Liberty st 

Lovejoy, S. hosiery, yarn, and trimming 
store, 95 Baltimore st between South 
and Calvert 

Lovejoy, Amos, 217 Baltimore st. near 
Liberty, wholesale dealer in gloves, 
knitting yarns and worsteds, knitting 
cottons, embroidering worsteds and 
patterns, canvass, etc. ; also, patent 
threads, needles, pins, tapes, bobbins, 
hooks and eyes, spool cotton, silk 
galoons, silk, worsted, and cotton 
Fringes, coat cords and bindings, carpet 
and Venetian bindings, silk and cotton 
braids and cords, sewing siks, woollen 
comforts, silk purses, eylets, tooth | 



10 



brushes, buttons, thimbles, scissors, 
silk, woollen, merino and cotton un- 
dershirts and drawers, suspenders, 
etc. etc. 

Merriam, J. \V. dealer in gloves, hosiery, 
woollen and worsted yarns, embroid- 
ering worsteds, patterns, etc. 147 Bal 
timore st. 

Sisco, Charles, 71 Baltimore st opposite 
Holliday. 

Stearns & Sikken, 45 Baltimore st 

Ink Manufacturer . 

Furlong, John, manufacturer of Nonpa- 
reil Writing Ink, N. E. corner of Li- 
berty and Fayette sts. 

Instrument Makers. 

Ewin, John, manufacturer and importer 
of mathematical and nautical instru- 
ments, 23 Thames st F.P. 

Green, James, 53 South st 

Hunt, Harvey W. 69 Pratt st. below 
South, mathematical, philosophical, 
nautical, and optical instrument ma- 
ker. 

Rutt, Richard & Sons, mathematical 
instrument makers, Thames st. F.P. 

Sadtler, Philip B. & Son, (late T. F. 
Hamilton & Co.) 172 Baltimore st 

Iron Founders. 

Barker, John & Son, N. Calvert st. 

Bates, James, iron founder, Pratt street 
bridge. Every description of heavy 
and light castings made at the shortest 
notice. All orders promptly attended 
to. 

Blake & Fales, North st. iron foundry, 
between Franklin and Bath. 

Chenoweth, Richard B. corner of Front 
and Plowman sts., and 30 Pratt street, 
between Gay and Commerce, machin- 
ist and iron founder. 

Denmeads & Daniels, monument foun- 
dry, corner of Monument and North 
sts., have their iron foundry, and ma- 
chine shop in complete operation, and 
are extensively prepared to execute 
all orders in their line, faithlully and 
promptly. 

Paul, Alexander, iron and brass founder, 
millwright and machinist, Lexington 
st. west of Green. 

Share, Richard, W. Falls avenue, south 
of Pratt st bridge, engineer, machinist 
and iron founder. Orders for machin- 
ery and castings of every description, 
cotton and tobacco screws, presses, 
castings for flour and sawmills, etc. 
executed with despatch. 

Wilson, J. G. & Bro. iron foundry, Pratt 
Et between Eutaw and Paca. 

Winans, Ross, Mount Clare depot, man- 
ufacturer of locomotive engines and 
rail road wheels. 



ALTIMORE BUSINE 



DIRECTORY. 



Iron and Steel. 

Brooks, Isaac, 72 and 71 S Calvert st. 

keeps constantly on hand, a large 
stock of every description of wrought 

iron, especially such as is suitable for 
machinery, including very large size.-. 
of Hats, squares and rounds, of best 
English refined. 

Holland, J. cor. Light and Water sts. 

Keyser, S. S. 67 South st. Bowly's whf. 

Parker, Oliver, corner of Calvert and 
Lombard sts. importer of tin plates, 
iron and steel, and dealer in all kinds 
of American iron, iron wire, block tin, 
spelter, sheet zinc, copper, pig lead, 
sheet brass, sheet lead, etc. etc. 

Smith, J. & A. iron merchants, 4 Pratt 
street wharf, keep regularly on hand 
the following, in all the various sizes 
in general use: — hammered and rolled 
bar iron ; flat, round, and square, hoop- 
band, rod ami scroll iron; east, shear, 
German and blister steel; castings, 
hollow-ware, nails, spikes, etc. etc. 

Jeweller. 

Johannes, J. M. jeweller and diamond 
setter, Bank lane, between Charles 
and St. Paul 's sts. 

JLace Goods. 

Edwards, S. lace and fancy store, 7-3 Bal- 
timore st. 

Fischer, Charles & Co. importers and 
wholesale dealers in laces, hosiery, 
and gloves, etc. 274 Baltimore st. 

Hoftmeister & Co. importers and whole- 
sale dealers, 6 S. Liberty st. 

Hennigs, E. A. A Co. importers, No. 
225 1-2 Baltimore st. 

King, J. T. 27 1-2 VV. Pratt st. 

Pulvermacher, F. cheap lace and ribbon 
store, 21 W. Pratt st. 

JLace and Fringe Manu- 
facturers. 

Gade, John, 20 N. Gay st. respectfully 
informs his friends and the public, 
that he has on hand, and oners for 
sale, a variety of patterns of lace and 
fringes. Coach makers and storekeep- 
ers are invited to call and judge for 
themselves. Purchasers dealt with 
on the most liberal terms, and the 
goods sold as low as any of the same 
description in the United States, either 
for cash or approved paper. 

Miller, John H. 157 Baltimore st. 

Siseo, Charles, 71 Baltimore st. opposite 
Holliday, manufacturer and importer 
of fringes, tassels, cords, gimps, but- 
tons, bindings, webbings, laces, braids, 
borderings, ladies' dress trimmings, 
cap trimmings, horse nets, gold and 
silver fringe, tassels, cords, stars.laces, 
edgings, braids, bullions, foil stone, 



coach lace, fringe and tassels, military 
trimmings, odd fellows and masonic 
regalia, jewels, breast plates, gavils, 
robes, caps, banners, etc. etc. 

Lamp Makers. 

Bailey, P. A. dealer in Webb's patent 
burners and camphine oil, 109 Balti- 
more st. 

Spilcker, C. W. wholesale and retail 
dealer in lamps of every description, 
lamp glasses, wicks, etc. etc. 100 Bal- 
timore st. 

Thompson, M., Marion st. between Park 
and Howard sts., manufactui 
keeps constantly on hand, wholesale 
and retail, every description of coach 
lamps, of the neatest and most sub- 
stantial workmanship, at reasonable 
prices. Glass bent to order, and every 
other kind of work in his line, will be 
promptly attended to, and executed 
in a satisfactory manner. 

West, C. VW west Pratt street, between 
Howard and Eutaw sts. manufacturer 
of the safety reflecting camphine oil 
lamps. The best quality of camphine 
oil always on hand. 

JLast Makers. 

Smith, Seth, 22 S. Calvert street, and in 
Lombard, between Lloyd and Canal 
sts., has on hand a full assortment of 
articles in his line. Lasts made and 
warranted to fit the foot. 

Merriken, J. S. 5 Lombard street, west 
of South, manufacturer, and wholesale 
and retail dealer in boot and shoe 
trees, lasts, crimping machines and 
boards— prices reduced fifteen per cent. 
Constantly on hand boot trees, per 
piece, 62 12 cents ; mens' block lasts, 
per pair, 62 12 cents ; womens' lasts, 
per dozen, $-2,50— all others in pro- 
portion. Lasts made to fit any defor- 
mity of the foot, or tenderness occa- 
sioned by corns or otherwise, so as to 
give perfect ease and satisfaction, or 
the money will be returned. Boot 
and shoemakers will avoid the disa- 
greeable necessity of altering, by pur- 
chasing their lasts of him, as they are 
in order to go to the journeymen. 

Leather Dealers. 

Birely, V., Cheapside.— L. A. Birely, 

agent. 
Crane, W. ,fe Co. corner Cheapside and 

Lombard st. 
Davenport, Joseph, 14 Cheapside. 
Deford, B. & Co. corner Calvert and 

Lombard sts. 
Jenkins, W. N. &, Sons, 4 Water St. 
Krebs, G. AV. 52 3. Calvert st. 
Pasquay, Jacob, 16 Cheapside. 
Startzman, Isaac, 56 S. Calvert st. 
Sullivan, T. H. 36 S. Calvert st. 



ALTIMORE BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



115 



Lcechers and Bleeders. 

Gill, Bryson & Sons, practice bleeding, 
leeching, ami cupping, cor. Hanover 
and Lombard Eta. 

Jackson, Clias. bleeder, k-echerand cup- 
per, 8 N. Frederick st 

Kennedy, Mrs. E. cupper and leecher, 
n ui st. 1 door E. of How trd. A 
• int supply of the best Spani b 
leeches. 

better Cutter, in Metals. 

Smith, Wrn. corner of Light and B ill 
more a%e , is prepared to i-m I ., 
lions, stamps, artificial Sower p 
es, Btem ils,etc. for the use of millers, 
merchants, mechanics, &c. in tbe 
Beatest manner, on n 
and with punctuality, and solicits a 
share of public patronage. 

Libraries — Circulating. 
Ha.r/.-che, John T. 30 Baltimore st. 
Knight & Colburn, 171 Baltimore st. 
Library Company of Baltimore, 

of Fayette and Baltimore sts. — U. 11. 

Owen, librarian. 
Moore, J. 74 Baltimore st. 
Robinson, J. 110 Baltimore st. 

Lime and Feed. 

Fitzpatrick, John, 3 Hollingsworth and 

Grant sts. 
Green, Jacob, 40 X. G ty st 
I.ockerd, John, Pratt st. west of Paca. 
Mayburry, Thomas, dealer in lime and 

plasterers hair, second door from the 

south east corner of Lexiogti 

Green streets, near the west end of 

Lexington Market. 
Robinson Win., No. 4 Hollingswortb st. 

2 doors from Pratt; dwelling corner 
tmden and Eutaw sts. 
Trotter, Thos. Xo. 2 Buchanan's whf. 

Lithographers. 

Weber, Edward & Co. Light, corner of 

Baltimore street, are prepared to exe- 
cute, with neatness and despatch, all 
kinds of maps, plans, charts, portraits, 
anatomical and architectural drawing, 
landscapes, diplomas, machinery, title 
pages, visiting and business cards, 
circulars, bills of exchange, bill-heads, 
checks, notes, labels, etc. etc. 

Livery Stables. 

Dukehart, H. Exchange Stables, North 
street. 

Mofl'ett, Robert, corner of Liberty and 
Lombard streets ; also, cor. of Lom- 
bard and Howard sts. 

"I, George, Fountain Stables, 
Fayette st. between Charles and Lib- 
el ty. 

Stewart, John, 64 N. Calvert st carriage; 
for hire. 



Woodward, N. R. Post Oflice Stables, 
North street. 

Lock Smiths. 

Clark, James, X. Frederick St. lock 
smith and bell hanger. 

Cell.,., & McAlefir, Xo. 99 Harrison 
street, patent lever lock makers and 
bell bangers. 

F.vatt, Columbus, 56 Light st. 

Johnson, F. 38 Baltimore st. house, 
ship, store and bank locks of all kinds, 
made to order. 

Kloke, Anton, Green st. between Fay- 
I Baltimore. 

Renter, A. 37 Harrison st. patent lever 
lory. 

Stewart, C. J. lock smith and bell hang- 
er, 133 Bank lane. 

Looking Glass and Pic- 
ture Frames. 

Cariss & Schultz, (late T. Palmer & Co.) 
furnishing warerooms, No. 108 Balti- 
more street, importers of French anil 
German looking glasses, cutlery, plat- 
ed, japaned and failCJ hardware, and 
manufacturers of portrait, picture and 
looking glass frames, window cornices, 
every variety. 

Fryer, E. S. No. -2 north Gay st. practi- 
, .,| | nt, and ptc tr.re 

frame manufacturer ; has constantly 

On hand by direct importation, and 
otters for sale, wholesale and retail, 
leasing terms, a very extensive 
and general assortment of superfine 
French and German looking glass 
I, from the largest to the smallest 
size in use. He is extensively pre- 
pared to manufacture mantel, pier, 
looking glass, portrait and picture 
frames, brackets and cornices for win,. 
and mouldings for rooms of 
every vavity of pattern and finish, 
which for cheapness, elegance and du- 
rability, cannot be surpassed by any 
other establishment in the U. States, 

Geddes, G. & C. 32 Fa3ette st. one door 
■ i tot Howard, manufacturers of look- 
ing glass, portrait and picture frames 
in all their varieties. A general as- 
sortment of which is alwaj s on hand, 
and ottered wholesale and retail, at 
the lowest manufacturing prices; old 
frames regilt; looking glass plates and 
picture glass by box or single plate. 

Seager, Thomas, No. 7 south* Sharp st. 
manufacturer of looking glass and pic 
frames, wholesale and retail ; looking 
glass plates of all sizes; old frames re- 
guilt in the best manner. Country 
men hants are requested to call and 
examine before purchasing elsewhere. 

Smith & Fenn, No. 34 south Charles St. 
A general assortment of looking glas 
ses, wholesale and retail. 



116 



ALTIMORE 



Lumber. 



USINESS DIRECTORY. 



Carson, Allison & Co. Buchanan's whf. 
Creamer, J. & Son, Union Dock — also 

Monument street, O. T. 
House, Samuel, & Son, corner of Light 

et. wharf and Barre st. 
House, T. J. cor. Saratoga and Pacasts. 
Kirby, Waters & Miller, cor. of Centre 

and Howard sts. 
Mills, Wm. P., W. Falls avenue, near 

Pratt st. bridge. 
Randolph, John W. Fell street, F. P.; 

dwelling cor. Wilk and Market sts. 
Sloan, White & Co. 27 Light st. whf. 
Wilhelm, Geo. W. cor. of Monument 

and Ensor sts. 

Machinists. 

Denmeads & Daniels, cor. Monument 

and North sts. 
Mayger & Washington, Front st, be- 
tween Lombard and Plowman. 
Murray, James, millwright, machinist, 

turner, and pattern maker, York st 

east of Light. 
Page, Geo. W. Franklin st. extended. 
Reeder, Chas., iron founder and steam 

engine builder, south side of the basin. 
Rodgers, John, 46 N. High st. 
Watchman & Bratt, iron founders and 

steam engine builders, south side of 

the basin. 

Magistrates. 

Eichelberger, Wm. of J. corner of Fay 
ette and St. Paul sts.; dwelling Lex 
ington st. Pascault's row. 

Gray, Henry W. north-east corner of 
Lombard and Charles sts. ; dwelling 
northeast corner of Sharp and Con 
way streets. 

Heath, J. P. Favette near Charles st 

McDonald, D. H. No. 3 Holliday street; 
dwelling St. Mary, south of Ross st. 

Miltenberger, A., Mercer, near Calvert. 

Pechin, Wm. cor. Bond and Alice Ann. 

Purviance, S. cor. St. Paul and Fayette. 

Ridgely, Noah, 15 S. Howard St. 

Schaefler, Wm. A— Dwelling, N. Fred- 
erick st. — office in the basement. 



Mahogany. 



Hiss & Austin, No. 69 Fayette st, al 
ways on hand and for sale, an assort' 
ment of mahogany on reasonable 
terms. 

Marble Manufacturers. 

Baughman & Bevan, cor. Franklin anc 

Park sts. 
Benteen, H. C. Eutaw, below German 
Connolly, John F. Monument street, 
opposite the jail; constantly on hand 
and for sale, an extensive supply of 
Marble in the rough and from the 



Gaddess, Alex, cor. Sharp and German 
streets, opposite Rev. Mr. Henshaw's 
church. 

Power & O'Donald, cor. Franklin and 
Calvert sts. 

Medicines. 

French, John C. 33 South st. general 
agent for the sale of the genuine Mor- 
rison's pills, imported from London. 
Gouley, L. vegetable medicine store, 
No. 21 1-2 Baltimore et between Har- 
rison and Frederick, where can be had 
the following medicines, of his own 
manufacture, which have been pro- 
nounced superior to any others before 
the public for the cure of the different 
diseases to which they are applicable. 

Gouley's Vegetable Bitters.— This 
will be found one of thevery best med- 
icines f5r the cure of fever and ague, 
bilious fever, dyspepsia, weakness of 
the stomach, liver complaint, head- 
ache, disentery, rheumatic pains and 
swellings, piles, etc. Directions for 
their use accompany each bottle — price 
50 cents per bottle. 

Gouley's Cough Drops.— Warrant- 
ed to cure coughs, hooping cough, 
croup, or any other chronic disease. 
They will also cure the most aggra- 
vated case of consumption if taken 
with the vegetable bitters, according 
to the directions which accompany 
them. — Price 50 and 37 1-2 cents per 
bottle. 

Gouley's Anti-Bilious Pills. — These 
pills will be found to be a valuable 
medicine for the cure of all bilious 
complaints, head ache, etc., and will 
act on the system without producing 
pain, griping, or any disagreeable feef 
ing whatever. — Price 25 cents per 
box. 

Gouley's Eye Water. — For the cure 
of sore, weak and inflamed eyes. — 
This preparation will be found one 
of the best extant for persons afflicted 
with weak, sore or inflamed eyes; 
the proprietor having received numer- 
ous testimonials of its good effects. — 
Price 37 1-2 cents per vial. 

Gouley's Tetter Liniment. — A cer- 
tain and speedy cure for tetter and 
ring-worm, affections of the skin, etc. 
Price 50 cents per vial. Many persons 
in this city have been cured by this 
application. 
Houck, J. laboratory, 10 S. Charles st. 
Ziegler, B. agent for the sale of Brand- 
reth's pills, corner of Light and Mer- 
cer sts. 

Merchants. 

Barney, John & Son, south Gay st. 
Brown, Alexander & Sons, merchants 
aud bankers, No. 128 Baltimore street 



BALTIMORE BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



117 



Dws. — George Brown, Holliday si 
opposite the theatre; H. H. Perry 
corner of High and Salisbury 'ts. 

Crosby, Joseph, importer and wholesale 
dealer in fruits, etc. 40 S. Charles at 

Deecke & Gerdes, 62 Lombard st. ex- 
porters oI'li-al'ti.h.nTo, -importers and 
wholesale dealers in coflee, madder, 
in atin. 

Gilmor, Robert & Son-?, Second st, be- 
t ween Gaj and South. 

Wilson, Wm. >t Sons, 105 Baltimore at 
Dwellings; James Wilson, Holliday 
st; Thomas Wilson, Lexington st. ; 
l)a\ id 8. Wilson, Lexington st 

Military Goods. 

I I ft Brother, corner of Balti- 
more and Charles st-. manufacturers, 
and wholesale and retail dealers in 
every description of military goods. 

Jacob, manufacturer of military 
caps, silvei and brass ornaments, etc. 
etc.; also, executes dies for military 
companies, in the neatest manner, and 

ly given description, — 220 Balti 



lure st. 



Milliners. 



Carter, Jane, corner Gougli and Caro- 
line sts. F. P. 

Dixon, Maitha, Market st F. P. 

Dolan, B. 3 Baltimore st 

Hahn, Mrs. M. 27 Lexington st. between 
Charles and Liberty sts. — Bonnets, 
trimmings, ribbons, artificial flowers. 



etc. 



stc. 



H mult. m, Mrs. M. A. corner Lexington 
and Sharp sts. 

Hunt, W., Market st. F. P. 

Lafferty, Rosanna, N. High st near Gay. 

Lambeer, Marj & Eliza, comer Charles 
and Saratoga sts. 

Lee, Miss Martha, Eden st 6 doors from 
Jefterson. Dresses made to order in 
the neatest manner, and most fashion- 
able style, and on reasonable terms. 

Lankford, Mrs. M. A., Fren h millinery 
store, 51 1-3 Baltimore st. 

Murdoch, A. 59 Lexington st cheap 
bonnet and ribbon store. 

Rosenswig, E. importer and manufac 
turer of straw bownets ; straw bonnets 
cleansed and altered in the neatest 
manner, — 3G Lexington st. 

Smith. Mrs. S. E. millinery and fancy 
store, 75 N. Gay st. 

Smith, Susanna, Market st F. P. 

Snyder, Mrs. Eliza, millinery and fancy 
goods, 29 Lexington st 

Millstones. 

Egenton &. Morris, at the old stand, 
west Falls avenue, foot of Pratt st. 
bridge, and corner of Para and Sara- 
toga sts. continue to make to order, 
French bun millstones, of all dimen 



Hions, which they will warrant to be 
of be^t quality, being made from burr 
blocks or their own importation, and 
selected b$ them from the best quar- 
ries in France. Tbes keep for sale 
Dutch or < al igne millstones, all sizes; 
Cocalico and E opus, ditto, French 
burr blocks, and calcined plaster of 
Paris. Orders promptly attended to. 

Mineral "Water. 

Randall & Co. mineral water and syrup 
dealers, wholesale and retail, base- 
ment of Barnum's City Hotel, Mon- 
ument square. ]). A. Randall and P. 
H. Keech. 

Morocco Dealers. 

Ballauf, Augustus, 74 Harrison st 
Davenport, Joseph, 14 Cheapside. 

Grafllin, J. W. ft S. D. tor. Cheapside 

and Lombard st. 
Grnbb, Wm. 3 Hillen st. 
Kalbfue, D. ft L. <fc Co. 2 Cheapside. 
Kqqi, John, 17 Cheapside. 

Musical — Instruments, etc. 

Ben teen, F. D. (successor to J. Cole,) 
piano forte and music warehouse, 137 
Baltimore st. has an extensive assort 
ment of all music published in this 
country, and likewise a large assort- 
ment of foreign music from the most 
classical composers ; piino f ites from 
the celebrated factories of Chickering 
& Mackay, Boston ; Nunns ft Clark, 
New York, and Rosenkranz, Germa- 
ny, with met die plates and metalie 
frames, warranted to be of the first 
order. Splendid double action harps, 
made by Erard, London ; guitars, 
with patent screws, and all other mu- 
sical instruments, etc. constantly for 
sale. 

Carusi, S. piano forte and music store, 
84 Baltimore st importer of music, 
musical instruments, Italian strings, 
etc. etc. 

Conradt, G. J. piano forte dealer and 
music seller, 155 Baltimore st. 

Eisenhrant, C. H. 54 Baltimore st 

Hildebrandt, S. W. 4 Park ft. 

Horl'meister & Co. 6 S. Liberty st 

Pfafi, J. 91 W. Pratt st. 

Willig, Geo. jun. music publisher, mu- 
sical instruments, etc. No. 161 Balti- 
more st. 

Notaries Public. 

Eiclielberger, Wm., of J., cor. Fayette 

and St. Paul st. 
Gill, John, 42 Lombard st 
Miltenberger.A. Mercer st. near Calvert 
Sanderson, H. S. cor. Gay and Lombard 

streets. 
Welch, R. M. 46 Lombard st 



118 



BALTIMORE BUSINESS D1EECTORY, 



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Nurseries. 

Feast, Samuel, exotic Nursery and 
seedsman, N. E. cor. of Charles and 
Saratoga sts., keeps constantly on 
hand a general collection of green- 
house plants, ornamental trees and 
shrubs, herbaceous plants, dahlias, 
etc. ; together with a choice assort- 
ment of garden and flour seeds,— all 
which he offers for sale on the most 
liberal terms. Nursery, Franklin st. 
west of Cove. 

Oil Stores. 

Bailey, P. A. dealer in Webb's Patent 
Burners and Camphine Oil, 109, Bal- 
timore st. Constantly on hand a gen- 
eral assortment of lamps, adapted to 
every use, — for safety, brilliancy, e- 
conomy and simplicity of construc- 
tion, they far exceed anything that 
has ever heen offered ; and as a re- 
commendation, it is only necessary to 
state that we have now over thirty 
thousand in successful operation in 
the United States. Recollect, No. 109 
Baltimore st 
Greenough, B. F. Patent Lamps and 
Chemical Oil, No. 99 1-2 Baltimore st 
where he has now on hand a complete 
assortment of lamps for stores, shops, 
churches, factories, hotels, etc., con- 
sisting of a new style of shadowless 
lamps for parlors, study, Liverpool, 
mantel, side and branch lamps, etc. 
This article has been used in many of 
our principal hotels and most respec- 
table families for upwards of two 
years, with entire satisfaction — not a 
single instance having occurred dur- 
ing this period wherein the purchasers 
availed themselves of the agent's 
guarantee. Any one so disposed can 
be satisfied that a single burner will 
emit more light, at an expense of one 
cent per hour, than three ordinary 
burners, consuming sperm oil at an 
average expense of three cents each. 
Another, and not the least advantage 
from its use, is the simplicity of the 
construction and cleanliness of the 
Chemical Oil. It is warranted to be 
a far better and cheaper artificial light 
than any other now in use. Every 
lamp will be warranted — if not per- 
fectly satisfactory, can be returned. 
Those about purchasing lamps would 
find it for their advantage to call at 
the store, as above, where the differ- 
ent kinds may be seen in operation. 
Spilcker, C. W. wholesale and retail 
dealer in Lamp Oil; Sperm and Tal 
low Candles ; Lamps of every descrip 
tion ; Lamp-glasses ; Wicks, etc. etc 
No. 106 Baltimore st. 



LTIMORE BUSIN 



DI RE CTO 



119 



West, C. 93 west Pratt st manufactures 
and keeps constantly on hand Cam 
pliine Oil of the best quality. 

Oil Clotli, etc. 

Cutler, J. S. No. 6'J Baltimore street, 
plaid, white, and black Oiled Silk 
Aprons, &c. Also, a general assort- 
ment of India Kubber goods. 

Denison, Conain & Co. Oil Cloth manu- 
facturers, south High st. O.T. l'at.;nt 
Floor Cloths, (oilcloth carpets,) are 
manufactured of all dimensions, with- 
out seams, in a great variety of splen 
did and plain patterns, at the e~t ib 
lishment, corner of Pratt anil Market 
sts. F. P , and for sale at the ware- 
rooms, in south High st. between 
Baltimore and Lombard sts. where 
they may be had at all times read] 
for use; also, Carriage and Portrait 
cloth. 

Opticians. 

Holland, L. 13 St. Paul, near Bait. st. 

Sadtler, Philip B. &. Son, (late T. Fen- 
ton Hamilton & Co.) 172 Baltimore st. 
between Charles and St. Paul sts., 
have for sale an assortment of Optical 
and Mathematical Instruments, Ther- 
mometers, Barometers, Spectacles, 
Spy-glasses, etc. New glasses fitted 
to spectacle frames ; spectacles and 
thermometers repaired. Their spec- 
tacles will be furnished with glasses 
of the best quality, and particular at 
tention will be given as to the focus 
best adapted to the sight of the wearer, 
as great injury often results from an in- 
judicious selection of glasses, or from 
the use of those of an inferior quality. 
Gold, Silver and Steel Spectacles by 
the dozen, well assorted in sights. 

Organs. 

Judge, Henry, 15 Holliday st. between 
Fayette and Baltimore, Organ builder 
and general Musical Instrument ma- 
ker. Also, repairs and tunes Organs, 
Piano Fortes, Harps, Accordians, 
Flutes, and all other kinds of Musical 
Instruments, in the best manner, at 
the shortest notice, and on reasonable 
terms. 

Painters. 

House, Sign and Fancy. 

Duvall & Maccubbin, 1 east Fayette st. 

Eichelberger, J. M., N. Paca, S. of Lex- 
ington st, 

Hayes, John, Marion, between Howard 
and Liberty sts. painter and decorator. 

Hook, Henry, 43 Lexington st. 

McLean, Arthur, 1 Harrison st. house, 
sign and ornamental Painting, Glazing, 
Gilding, etc. All orders in his line 
will receive immediate attention. 



McLeary, Henvy, jun. Bank lane, one 
door from Calvert st. and immediately 
opposite Barnum's Hotel. All kinds 
of house and coach plating executed 
in the best manner, and on reasonable 
terms. 
Meredith, J. F. Concord stone door 

from Pratt St. 
Mules, Isaac, German, near Howard st. 
Nails, Benj. F. 17 N. Gay st 
Needles, Edward, cor. Hanover and 
German sts. ; Painter, Glazier, and 
Plumber. 
O'Laugblen <fe Armor, cor. of Holliday 

and Fayette sts. 
Pell, VVm. 17 N. En taw, st 
Pope Daniel, 111 W.Pratt st 
Pope, Folger, 32 S. Calvert st. 

Lines. J. 16 S. Charles st 
Sullivan, Wm. 95 S. Eutawst 
Sbannessy, James, 91 Fayette st 
Stone, James E. 10 N. Paca st 
Turner, T. K. 11 E. Fayette st. 
Welch, John, cor. Ann and Thames sts. 

Portrait and Miniature. 
Fitz, H.jr., Daguerreotype Likenesses, 

11-2 Baltimore st. (up stairs.) 
Gebhard, Chas. E. J. 97 Baltimore st. 
Lockwood, Rembrandt, 1 Baltimore st 
Voigt, Lewis Towson, 100 Baltimore st 
Wattles, J. H. cor. Koss and Eutaw sts. 

Paints, Oils and Glass. 

Ball & Garrettson, 22 W. Pratt st. 

Howell, w. p. j un . 2-2 Cheapside, keeps 
constantly on hand a general assort- 
ment of window glass, oils, paints, and 
dye-stuffs ; tar, rosin, etc. fresh and 
of good quality, which he will sell 
low for cash, or to approved custom- 
ers. He is also prepared to contract 
for the delivery of any quantity, and 
6ize of window glass, at short notice. 

Hulls, John, 2.3 N. Gav st. 

Townsend, T. J. No. 57 Centre Market 
space, dealer in glass, oils, paints and 
dye-stuffs. 

Paper Hangings. 

Birch, W. S. manufacturer and whole- 
sale and retail dealer in paper hang- 
ings, 131 Baltimore st. between Cal- 
vert and Light 

Griffith, G. S. & Bro.1001-2 Baltimore st. 

Hulls, John, 23 N. Gay st 

Ryland, John, N. Gay stone door S. of 
Front 

Sholes, Thos. C. 3 N. Gay st. 

Paper Warehouses. 

Carter, R. & Son, paper manufactur- 
ers ; warehouse, Lombard st. between 

Light and Charles. 
Meeteer's paper warehouse, 3G South 

Charles st. ; T. G. Hill, agent 
Spear, Otis, commission merchant, and 



no 



ALTIMORE BCS1NES! 



wholesale dealer in paper, slioes, hat3, 
eti . -1 ■-'• Charles st. 
Tamer, Wheelwright & Mudge,2south 
Charles st. ; dealers in paper, shoes 
and hats. 

Pattern Makers. 

Denmeads & Daniels, cor. Monument 

and North sts. 
Murray, James, York st. east of Light 

Periodical Agents. 

Hollis, C. agent for the periodicals of 
the Methodist Ep. Clinch. Office. 
at I. P. Cook's hookstore, 52 Balti- 
more st; dvv. Gibson st near Blddle. 
N. Y. Christian Advocate and Journal, 
weekly, $276 ; Sunday School Advo 
cate, semi-monthly — to Sun. Schools 
62 12 cents; to individuals, $1,00. 
Quarterly Review, $:j, 25; Ladies lie 
pository, (of Cincinnati,) monthly, 
with embellishments, $-2,75. Theabo 
are the advance prices, per year, i 
eluding delivery. 

Robertson, James, Literary Agency, 
222 12 Baltimore st., where can he 
obtained all the useful and entertain- 
ing literary publications of the U. S. 
and Europe. Also, blank books and 
stationery, and binding done to order. 
He is also agent for Dr. A. Sherman's 
Medicated Lozenges, Poor Man's 
Plaster, and compound Orris Tooth 
Paste. No person ever used either of 
them without being inclined to give 
them another trial. 

Taylor, Wm. Newspaper and Periodical 
office, 12 North st near the post office, 
where single copies of the following 
publications are constantly for sale, 
and subscriptions received : Periodi- 
cals, Graham's Magazine, The Lady's 
Book, Lady's Companion, Dollar 
Magazine, Young People's Book, 
People's Library, Lady's Amaranth. 
Lady's Album, Lady's Garland, Mili- 
tary Magazine, Roberts' semi month- 
ly Magazine, Phoenix and Budget, 
Portraits of the People, Journal of 
Banking, and Counterfeit Detector. — 
Nnospapers, Brother Jonathan, New 
World, Weekly and Daily Herald, 
Universal Yankee Nation, Boston No- 
tion, United States, Saturday Courier, 
Saturday Evening Post, Sat. Chroni- 
cle, N. Y. Mechanic, Sunday Atlas, 
Sunday Tunes, N. Y. Daily Express, 
New Era, N. Y. Sun, N. Y. Tribune, 
Philadelphia Ledser, Phil. Spirit of 
the Times, The Albion, The Europe 
an, Em. Old Countryman, Bell's Life 
in London, The Boston Times, Bal- 
timore Visiter, The Ocean, Washing- 
ton Globe, The Madisonian, National 
Intelligencer, etc. etc. A liberal de- 
duction to those who buy in packages. 



E C T O R Y 



Physicians. 



Aitkin, James. 44 N. Gav st. 

Bailey, G.W. Lombard stW. of Charles. 

Bain, J. cor. Gay and East sts. O. T. 

Baxley , W. Fayette st. above Eutaw. 

Bodder, L. D. corner of Lexington and 
Liberty sts. 

Bond, T. E. jun. 94 Lombard st 

BrjSCOe, J. H., N. Charles ; t. 

Chew, Samuel, 88 N. Howard st. 

Clendinen, Alexander, corner of Balti- 
more and Exeter sts. 

Cockrill, J. J. 9 Thames st. F. P. 

Davis, Chas. S. east Baltimore st near 
Exeter. 

Diffenderffer, M. corner of High and 
Plowman sts. 

Dulin, A. F. corner of N. Charles and 
Fayette sts. 

Dunbar, J. R. W. corner Lombard and 
Hanover sts. 

Durkee, D. A. 41 N. Gay st 

Fonerden, J. Fayette st. near Park. 

Fulton, R. 39 Sharp st. 

Handy, J. 14 S. Howard st. 

Handy, W. W. Piatt st. west of Sharp. 

Haynel, A. Fayette st. 

Hess, !•'. 62 Frederick st. 

Hintze, F. E. B , S. (Jay st.near Second. 

Jameson, H. Lexington St., near How- 
ard. 

Jamison, T. W., S Gay st. near Second. 

Jennings, S. K., Baltimore street, near 
Exeter. 

Love, W. S.— office and dwelling, C5 
Lexington st. 

Lynch, A. A., S. Charles st. three doors 
from Pratt st. 

McCulloch, H. T., S. W. corner of Pratt 
and Eden sts. 

McDowell, Maxwell, Fayette St. 

Miller, J. H. Fayette st. near Park. 

Miltenherger, G.W. demonstrator, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, corner of Sarato- 
ga and Sharp sts. 

Moore, W. B. cor. N. High and Pitt sts. 

Morris, H. corner of Wilk and Market 
sts. F. P. 

Monkur, J. C. S. Fell's Point Institute, 
Ann st. — Dwelling opposite. 

Otto, G. C. A. 67 Harrison st. 

Perkins, J. S. cor. Franklin and Green. 

Perkins, E. H. cor. Franklin and Green. 

Potter, N., St. Paul's st. 

Riley, Wm. Fayette st. between North 
and Calvert. 

Robinson, A. C. cor. Pine and Bait. sts. 

Smith, G. B— office, under the Chesa. 
peake bank, North st. ; Dwelling, Mul- 
berry st. between Pearl and Pine sts. 

Smith, N. R. 95 Lombard st. 

Starr, H., Liberty st between Fayette 

and Lexington. 
Stevenson, J. S., N. Gay st. near Front. 
Steuart, Rich. S. Saratoga st. between 

St. Paul's and Charles. 
White, J. oor. Hollidav and Fayette sts 



BALTIMORE BCS1NES 



DIRECTORY. 



121 



Whitridge, John, N. Gay st. south of 

Saratoga. 
Wright, T. H.— office, 71 Fayette st 

Botanic. 

Rose, John, first licentiate of botanic 
medicine in Maryland. — Office, Paca 
st. near Pratt 

Williams, Wm. J. — Office and dwelling, 
corner of Front and Hillen sts. In 
valids from a distance can be accom 
modated at his dwelling. 

Williams, J. M. 35 Harrison st the first 
oldest Thomsonian physician in Ma- 
ryland. 

Female. 
Strandley, Mrs. R. respectfully informs 
her friends and the public, that she 
still continues the practice of mid- 
wifery. Residence, Ida E. Pratt street, 
F. P. 

Piano Fortes. 

Benteen, F. D. 137 Baltimore st. 

Carusi, S. 84 Baltimore st. 

Conradt, G. J. 166 Baltimore st 

Eisenbrant, C. H. 54 Baltimore St. 

Hartge, Henry, west Baltimore st be- 
tween Pearl and Pine. 

Hisky, Jos. manufacturer — warehouse, 
6 S. Calvert Bt 

Huppmann, Geo. 26Hanoverst 

Knalie, Win. 45 N. Libeity st 

Miller, Joshua M. 22 Light st maker 
and importer of superior European 
piano fortes. 

Newman, J. & Bro. manufacturers and 
importers of piano fortes, 325 W. Bal- 
timore st. 

Stern & Quay, manufacturers, corner of 
Gay and Baltimore sts. 

Walter, Jacob, 56 N. Howard st. keeps 
constantly on hand, new and second 
hand piano fortes.— Pianos tuned and 
repaired, 

Willig, George, jr. 161 Baltimore st 

Wise, J.J. & Broth., No. 132 Baltimore 
street 

Planes. 

Atkinson, John, 56 Light st 

Brown, J.T., Lexington st near Liberty. 
Planes of all kinds, warranted of the 
best materials and workmanship, can 
be purchased on the most reasonable 
terms. 

Caldwell, Edwin, corner of Calvert and 
Mercer sts. ; dwelling, Paca St. four 
doors above Franklin. Planes of all 
kinds made of the best seasoned tim- 
ber, and in the best manner, and on the 
most accommodating terms. Planes 
made to architectural drawings, at 
short notice. Merchants supplied at 
the usual discount. 

Chapin, P. cor. Light and Balderston sts. 



Platers. 

Campbell & Schleigh, 16 S. Calvert st. 
Paine, Allen, 2-35 Baltimore st 
Seeger, Jacob, silver plater, 226 Balti- 
more st has constantly on hand a gen - 
eral assortment of house furniture, as. 
door plates, bell pulls, knockers and 
railing knobs, etc., both silver and 
brass, at moderate prices. Lock fur- 
niture, of every description, plated 
with despatch.— Gilding and silvering 
executed. 

Plumbers. 

Boss, Henry & Co. 20 Thames st F. P. 

Jorden, John M., No. 59 Centre Market 
space, keeps constantly on hand a gen- 
eral assortment of sheet lead of various 
thickness, and lead pipe of various 
sizes, water closets, pumps, cocks, 
etc. — Bath houses fitted up in all their 
various forms. 

Potteries. 

Brotlierton & Morton, manufactory, Pitt 

st. near Eden. 
Greble, Benjamin, at his pottery, Ensor 

st. above Monument, manufactures 

black and brown tea pots, common 

earthen and stone ware, etc. 
Jones, James E. manufacturer of stone 

and earthen ware, red and black tea 

and coffee pots, etc; 22 N. Gay street, 

near the bridge. 
Parr, Margaret, corner of Eden and E. 

Baltimore sts.— warerooms, 49 South 

street. 
Perine, M. & Co. western stone ware 

pottery, corner of W. Baltimore and 

Schroeder sts. 
Perine, M. earthen ware pottery, corner 

of Pine and Lexington sts. 
Powder Manufacturer. 

Beatty, James, 7 Pratt st. 

Printers — Book and Job. 

Bull & Tuttle, book and job printers, 7 
N. Gay st. are extensively prepared to 
execute every description of printing 
at the shortest notice, on the most 
reasonable terms. 

Cloud, R. M. & Co. 27 Second street— 
Every description of job printing exe- 
cuted with despatch, and on moderate 
terms. 

Haller, Thomas, 7 S. Liberty st 

Hanzsche, John T. 30 Baltimore st. 

Kurtz, B. superintendent of Publication 
Rooms, 7 S. Liberty street — Printing, 
publishing, and bookselling. 

Lucas & Deaver, coiner of "Calvert st 
and Lovely lane. 

Matcbett, Richard J. north-east corner 
of Gay and Lombard sts. 

Murphy, John, 146 Baltimore st printer 
and stationer. 



132 



BALTIMORE BUSINESS 



RECTORY, 



tJTeilson, It. 6 S. Calvertst (up staira.) 

Robinson, Jos. 110 Baltimore st. 

Sands, S. cor. Baltimore and North 6t8. 

Toy, John D. corner of Baltimore and 
St. Paul st; printing of even descrip 
tion done with neatriess and despatch, 
at the shortest notice, and most rea 
sonable terra?; dwelling, Monument 
st. cor. of Park. 

Warner, Wm. G. 3 S. Gay st. cheap job 
printing office. 

Woods & Crane, No. 1 N. Charles st 

Young, James, N. W. corner of Balti- 
more and Holliday sts. is extensively 
prepared, by constantly adding all the 
new, fashionable and useful type and 
borders, to execute every description 
of plain, fancy or ornamental printing, 
in a variety of colors, at short notice, 
and on terms equally low with any of- 
fice in the city. 



Copperplate. 

Bannerman, Wm. W. No. 1 St. Paul st. 

Mt-d airy, John, bank note and general 
copperplate printer, No. 136 Baltimore 
st. (up stairs.) 

Sands, Samuel, bank note and general 
copperplate and music printer, No. 53 
Baltimore St., opposite Mr. H. W. 
Bool's auction rooms, is prepared to 
execute every description of plate 
printing, such as bank notes, certifi- 
cates of stock, bills of exchange, dip- 
lomas, apotbecaries and manufactu- 
rers labels, batters tips, cards, music, 
etc., on the most reasonable terms, — 
having a greater number of presses, 
and of larger size than any other es 
tablishment in this city, be can exe- 
cute all orders entrusted to him with 
the utmost despatch. 

Horton, J. S. cor. South and Baltimore 
sts. engraver and copperplate printer. 

Property & Gen. Agents. 

Belt, Thos. H. & Thos. B. Breman, 
property agents, S. W. corner of Fay- 

Public Houses 



ette and St. Paul's sts.— Thos. B. Bre 
man, general agent. 

Hamer, Richard H. broker and general 
agent, S. Pa. -a st. 

Israel, F. & J. R. conveyancers. N. W. 
cor. of St. Paul and Fayette sts. 

Rose & Co. No. 40 Pratt street, general 
intelligence agents and collectors. 

Scotti, Lewis F. general intelligence 
broker's and slave agency office, W 
Fayette street, one door from St- Paul, 
the oldest establishment in the State 
of Maryland, where cash, and the 
highest prices at all times will be giv- 
en for slaves. 

Smith. Gideon B. agent for Audubon's 
birds of America, Albany Cultivator, 
Farmer's Cabinet, and for the pur- 
chase and sale of agricultural imple 
ments, animals, seeds, etc., — office un 
der the Chesapeake Bank, 2d door 
south of the Post Office. 

Spurrier, B. & A. conveyancers, Lex- 
ington st. west of the Law Building-, 

Warfield, W. cor. St. Paul and Fayette. 

Yearly, Alex, property and commission 
agent, accountant and collector, No. 
10 St. Paul ,-t. 

Young, Samuel, land agency office, Fred 
erick st. 1 door from Baltimore. 

Provision Dealers. 

F.arly, John D. 269 Baltimore st. 

Gassaway, Noah, commission merchant, 
for the sale of produce, etc., Nos. 3 
and 5 Pennsylvania avenue. 

Reynolds, Isaac, & Sons, Lombard st 
between Light and Charles. 

Rieman, Henry & Son, corner of How- 
ard and Fayette sts. curers of, and 
dealers in provisions; dwelling, cor. 
Lexington and Pearl sts. 

Van Brunt &. Adams, dealers in provi- 
sions generally, Lexington st. oppo 
the Market, ort'er for sale on pleasing 
terms, mess, No. 1, and prime beel 
and poik, in barrels and half barrels 
smoked beef; smoked and pickled 
tongues; bologna sausages ; bacon and 
lard, all wan anted of the best quality. 



NAMES OF HOL'SES. 



Baltimore House, 

Black Bear Hotel, 

Centre Hotel, 

City Hotel, 

Commercial House, 

Eagle Hotel, 

Eutaw House, 

Exchange Hotel, 

Farmers and Mechanics Retreat. 

Fountain Inn, 

Fowler's Hotel, 

Franklin Inn, 



LOCATION. 



18 Mercer st. 
Saratoga, near Howard, 
cor.Centre and Grant st^. 
Calveit and Fayette sts. 
I E. Piatt st. 
Franklin, near Eutaw st. 
cor. Bait, and Eutaw sts. 
Exchange Building, 
Franklin and Eutaw sts. 
Light, near Baltimore st. 
13 Bond st. F.P. 
'Howard and Mulberry, 



PROPRIETORS. 



,1. Chatburn 
Nimrod Woolery 
George Freeburger 
David Barnum 
J. G. Dorman 
Peter Rider 
Hussey & Elder 
J. Jewett 
William McCollum 
George Beltzhoover 
Wm.H, Fowler 
J. R. Kemp 



BALTIMORE BUSINES 



DIRECTORY 



123 



NAMES OK HOUSES. 

Franklin Inn, 
French's Hotel, 
General Wayne Inn, 
Globe Inn, 
Green House, 
!i 'a Hotel, 

Hand II 
Monument House, 

land House, 
Pennsylvania 1 1 
Stage Offii ' 

Hoi I, 
United StaU a Hotel, 

.mil Farmers Inn, 

a Hotel, 
Wheatfii I 
White Hall, 
William Tell House, 



LOCATION'. 

High and Hillensts. O.T. 
Market st. F. P. 
Baltimore and I'aca sts. 
Baltimore and Howard, 
Pratt st. op. K. i: 
116 N. High .st. O.T. 

:, ton st 
Monument S 
::i Pratt st. 

Franklin and I'aca sts. 
n st. 

. I.'. R. depot, 
Franklm 

How ird, near Baltimore, 
Fell's l'oint, 
3 Pratt st 



Ale and Oyster Houses. 



Adams', 
Adelphi House, 
Burton Ale Rooms, 

Cate's, 

Charles st. Restaurat, 

Collins', 

E igle Coffee Hou.se, 

user's, 
Franklin Coffee House, 
Kcnsett's, 
Marbury's, 
McCormick's, 
Military Hall. 

New Market Coffee House,' 
Nicholson's, 
Robinson's, 
Boonej 's, 
Sawkins', 
Shambure'a, 
Shaeffer & D -avail's, 
Sparrow's, 
Vickers', 
Western Lunch, 
Whittemore's, 



•2 Light ft. 

HolTiday and Fayette, 

28 Thames st. F. P. 
1 S. Charles st. 
14 Thames st. F. P. 
I.i-xington and Jasper, 
Court Hoti 

Second st. near South, 
n -t. E. of Eutaw. 

under Law Buildings, 

\. Gay, near Fayette st. 
31 Eutaw st. 
Green and Baltimore sts. 
t op. Bcltzhoov's. 
Mi i I II, i st 
Hollingsworth st 
rty st. 
under Assembly Rooms, 
r.l Market space, 
McClellan st. 
I'aca, near Lexington st. 
Lexington st.op. Market. 



PROPRIETORS. 

.J. H. Watkins 

Adam Trench 
Charles Goddard 
R. M. Beam 
C. W. Reach 

B ll.ibberset 

L. G. Quinhn 
Wm. <fc J. Guy, jun. 
Mil hael Dempsy 
A. Picking 
George Weaver 
Appier & Seguin 

1 haw 
I) . II utman 

v Lawless 

• ckey 
James Wall 
George N. Fischer. 



Philip Adams 
Frederick Elterman 
Win. H. Rose 
Amnion Cate 
Alex. Bandurand 

Urns 
John Bell 

mkhauser 
\ . A. Mc Donald 
George Kensett 
Wm.A. Marbury 

i ''ormick 
Thomas J. Sutton 
Krein & Hoffman 
Andrew Nicholson 
Thomas Robinson 
Michael Rooney 
W. Sawkins 
Wm. Shamburg 
Shaeffer & Duvall 
John Sparrow 
John Vickers 
Chas. McDonald 
J. Whittemore. 



Rope Maker. 

Watts, P. A. G6 South st. Bowly's Whf. 
manufacturer of patent cordage. 

Saddlery. 

Campbell & Schleigh, 1G S. Calvert st. 

Jenkins, Edward & Son, importers and 
•holesale dealers. 148 Baltimore st. 

Paine, Allen, importer, manufacturer 
and dealer in saddlery hardware, 235 
Baltimore st; dwelling Lexington, 
west of Pine st. 

Seeger, Jacob, manufacturer and dealer 
in saddlery hardware, 226 Baltimore 
st. has constantly for sale, a general 
assortment of articles in his line, viz : 
coach and harness mountings, hames, 
bands, bitts, stirrups, coach springs, 
axles, and all articles usually found in 



similar establishments. All kinds of 
plated saddlery, both siver and brass, 
made to order, at moderate prices. 

Saddle, Trunk and Har- 
ness Makers. 

Armstromg, Thos. 1G N. Liberty st. 

Blake & Hughes, saddle, harness, trunk 
and collar manufacturers, wholesale 
and retail, 46 South st. 

Hughson & Vail, 1 S. Calvert st. near 
the Museum, manufacturers of plain 
and quilted summerset, shaftoe, Span- 
ish, Mexican, ladies, and every other 
description of saddles; also, harness, 
travelling trunks, valises, carpet bags, 
bridles, and martingales, whips, etc. 
etc. all of which they warrant of the 
best materials, and superior workman- 
ship, which they will dispose of for 



124 



BALTI MORE 



cash, as low as the same quality of 
goods can be bought in the Union. 

Hunt, S. & T. H. 137 Baltimore street, 
between Calvert and Light, manufac- 
turers of saddles, travelling trunks, 
harness, saddle, and carpetbags, and 
every other article in their June of 
business. 

Jenkins & Lilly, 10 South st. 

Leib, Thomas, 66 Bond st. F. P. 

Ludeking, J. P., Paca, between Balti 
more and Fayette sts. 

Mathsion, John, collar manufacturer, 
84 1-2 Harrison st. 

Rogers & Blasdel, manufacturers of 
saddles, trunks and harness, whole- 
sale and retail, No. 190 Baltimore st. 
Dwellings, John C. Blasdel, N. E. 
corner E. Baltimore and East sts.; 
Charles Rogers, 93 Baltimore st. 

Selway & Musgrave,58 Baltimore st. 

Snyder, John, saddle, harness and trunk 
manufacturer, '270 Baltimore st. keeps 
constantly for sale every description 
of saddles, bridles, harness, trunks, 
and every article in his line, at the 
lowest prices. 

Sail Makers. 

German & Betts, 8 McElderry's whf. 
Loane, J. & Son, 67 Smith's whf. 

Salt Store. 

Waters, G. P. & Son, dealers in salt, 
etc. Fell's Point. 

Scales and Balances. 

Jesse Marden, corner of south Charles 
and Balderston streets, manufacturer 
of "Marden's Improved Patent Plat- 
form Scales," weighing from two oun- 
ces to two hundred tons; also, con- 
stantly on hand, as above, every va- 
riety of patent balances and scales, 
for banks, butchers, grocers, etc. of as 
good quality, and on as good terms, as 
can be had in the United States. 

Murdoch, Richard, No. 59 Lexington st. 
balance maker, machinist, and paten- 
tee of the Self Rotary Bonnet Presser. 

School Teachers. 

Cleveland, Dr. 14 Lexington st. near 
Charles, — Elementary, classical, and 
scientific institution, founded for the 
moral and intellectual education of 
young ladies. It consists of two de- 
partments, — the intellectual and the 
preparatory; the latter to fit younger 
pupils for the academical department. 

Davidge, Francis H. academy foryoung 
ladies, 11 St Paul's st. 

Gould, James F. corner Lexington and 
Davis sts; 

Haig, Miss E. A. seminary for young 
ladies, Lexington street, first house 
bellow Howard. 



DIRECTORY. 

Johnson, Hiram, youths school, Calvert 
st. opposite City Spring. 

Mclntire, Dr. James, young ladies and 
youths academy, 118 N. Howard st. 

Neely, J. young gentlemens academy, 
Lexington st. 

Rice, Miss M. select school, Bond st 
F. P. 

Ronceray, Chas. de, professor of music, 
94 south High St. 

Streeter, S. F. academy for young la- 
dies, Saratoga st. near Courtland. 

Robinson, J. C. 112 Baltimore st writ- 
ing, painting, drawing, and book-keep- 
ing academy. 

Seed Stores. 

Ault, Samuel & Son, importers and 
dealers in English garden 6eeds, cor. 
of Calvert and Water sts. 

Denny, Thos. seedsman, etc. corner of 
Pratt and Grant sts. (up stairs.) 

Feast, S. cor. Charles and Saratoga sts. 

Maxwell, Alex. 78 Ensor st. O. T. 

Mott, A. G. & N. U. cor. of Forest and 

Ensor sts. O. T. 

Ship Chandlers. 

Adams, E. cor Bond and Thames sts. 
Bennet, W. J. Fell st. F. P. 
Henderson, John & Co. 71 Pratt st 

ship chandlers and manufacturers of 

patent cordage. 

Shipwrights & Canlkers. 

Brown & R. Culley, ship and steam 
boat builders, south side of the basin, 
between Watchman's and Reeder's 
engine factories. 

Duncan, L. H. ship carpenter, cor. Wolf 
and Thames sts. 

Foster, Edward, Fell's st. F. P. 

Gardiner, Michael, Wolf st. F. P. 

Gardiner, Wm. & Geo. Wolf st F. P. 

Robb, J. A. & Co. E. Thames st. F. P. 

Smith, Wm. F., Block st. F. P. 

.Ship Joiners. 

Morris, Thos. C. east Thames st. F.P. 
Page, W. A., York st. east of William, 
(south side of the basin.) 

Silversmiths. 

Bowie, J. H. 58 Bank lane. 

Kirk, Samuel, manufacturer of silver- 
ware, jewelry, etc. 140 Baltimore at. 

Warner, Joseph P. watch case maker, 
54 Bank lane. Old cases repaired in 
the neatest manner; 

Slave Dealers. 

Purvis, James F. 2 south Calvert street, 
near Baltimore. 

Scotti, Lewis F. corner Fayette and St. 
I Paul's sts. 
(Slatter, Hope H. 86 W. Pratt st. 



BALTIMORE BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



125 



Soap ami Candles. 

Armstrong, James, Concord, near Pratt 
street. 

Boyd, Peter, Soap and Candle manu- 
facturer, Front street, between Lom- 
bard and Plowman sts. ; constantly 
on hand yellow and brown soap, mould 
and dipped candles of all sizes, and of 
the best description. Superior Balti- 
more tallow always on hand, and for 
3ale by the barrel, at the lowest cash 
prices. 

Hyde, Francis & Sons, manufacturers 
of fine and fancy soaps, mould and 
dipped candles, Pleasant st between 
Holliday and North. 

Hyde, S. G. -21 Saratoga st 

Gallagher & Monaghan, Clay st 2 doors 
east of Howard. 

Sliver & Faringer, Constitution st near 
Buren. 

Smith & Curlett, corner Holliday and 
Pleasant sts. 

Robinson, Wm. jun. commission mer- 
chant, and manufacturer of sperm oil 
and candles, 15 Bowly's wharf. 

Webb, C. & Son, Ensor st O.T. 

Stoves, Grates, etc. 

Bryan, C. 51 S. Calvert st 

Emicli, John V. 26 Light st stove fin 
isher, tin and sheet iron ware manufac 
turer; has constantly on hand, cook 
ing stoves, parlour stoves, Franklin 
stoves, 9 plate stoves, 10 plate stoves, 
coal stoves of sheet or cast iron. Old 
stoves repaired— all kinds of tin ware 
for family use ; also makes to order 
tin ware, suitable for cooking stoves, 
house spouting, stove pipe, drums, or 
any other article made of sheet iron 
or tin. 

Hayward, J. H. & Co. 19 and 21 Light st 

Parker, N. & E. L. corner Lombard and 
Calvert sts. 

Stanley & Co. 50 S. Calvert st. manu- 
facturers of rotary cooking stoves, par- 
lour stoves for coal or wood, and coal 
burners of the latest improvement 

Sugar Refiners. 

Ehlen, John H. 62 N. Eutaw st. 

Richstein, J. & G. corner of east Lom- 
bard, Concord, and Hawk sts., three 
squares east of the Exchange, between 
Centre market and the Falls. 

Torney, O., N. Paca st. below Franklin. 

Surgical Instruments. 

Jackson, Samuel, No. 11 N. Liberty st 
manufacturer of dental and surgical' 
instruments. Razors and penknives 
made to order, and warranted. 

Reinhart, Chas. C. surgical instrument 
maker and cutler, 24 Lombard street 



between Charles and Light. Surgical 
and dental instruments constantly on 
hand, at the lowest cash prices. 

Tailors and Drapers. 

Atkinson, John H. 40 Baltimore st. 
Ahern & Boyd, cor. Bait and Liberty. 
Basfbrd, Jacob, cash tailoring establish- 
ment, 163 Baltimore st. 
Bayzand, Wm. H. 74 Baltimore street, 
constantly on hand an assortment of 
dress and surtout coats, pantaloons, 
vests, stocks, etc. etc. 
Benson, Samuel, 68 Baltimore st keeps 
a general assortment of cloths, cassi- 
mers, vestings, etc. etc. which he will 
makeup in the latest st) le and fashion. 
Bogue, Henry, N. Calvert st. under Bar- 

num's hotel. 
Broughton, James, 114 Baltimore Ft 
Buckley, Root L. 19 W. Pratt st. 
Callow, John, 108 Pratt st. 
Caldwell, Wm. 75 N. Howard st 
Chabot, G. H. jr. 1 S. Gay st. 
Chalmers, P. S. 46 Eutaw st. 
Cornelius & Bishop, S. E. cor. Hanover 

and Pratt sts. 
Collison, Wm. 3 Sharp st 
Counselman & Alexander, 12 Eutaw st 
Denniston, J. H. & Co., W. Baltimore 

st. four doors east of Pine. 
Dulany, Wm. 44 N. Howard st 
Faithful, Joseph, 2 S. Sharp st 
Ford. Wm. H. 29 N. Howard st 
Holtzman, Geo. 177 1-2 Baltimore st 
Hardy, John D. 27 N. Liberty st. 
Hull, Wm. A. 45 Lombard st. 
Hilberg, Wm. & Son, 4 S. Calvert st. 
Hanney & McDowell, 62 W. Pratt st 
Harrington, E. 7 Baltimore st 
Johnscn, T. H., Exeter st. one door be- 
low Hillen. 
Kelsey, E. 119 N. High street, near Gay, 
cuts and makes to order, every de- 
scription of gentlemens' wearing ap- 
parel, in his line of business, in a very 
superior and most fashionable stvle. 
Kelso, John R. 6 South st. 
Lewis, John, successor to Henry' How- 
ard, 14 South st 
Lusby, Wm. 7 South st. 
Manderson, John, Thames st. F. P. 
Maloy & Momingstar, 93 N. Howard st. 
March & Magers, Liberty, near Fayette. 
Maccubbin, H. W. 75 1-2 N. Howard st 
Martin, John, 37 S. Charles st. 
McDonald, John, 12 South st. 
Merchant, Joseph, 113 N. Gay st 
Orem & Morling, corner Baltimore and 

N. Charles sts. 
Price, Benjamin, 60 N. Howard st 
Ruckle & Vansant, Baltimore st. base- 
ment of the Eutaw House. 
Shipley, Daniel E. 5 Sharp st 

ith, Reuben, 8 N. Liberty st 
Stine, Joseph, 16 Hanover st 
Tittle, J. & Son, 23 South st. 



21 



136 



BALTIMORE COSINESS DIRECTORY 



Starr & Ford, 62 South st. 
Stewart, W. J. 46 Eutaw st 
Sutton, J. L. & R. Hall, 7 S. Gay st 
Wagner, B. 4 S. Sharp st. 
Warrington, T. J. 20 N. Gay st. 
Wheeler, A. C. basement story of the 
Eutaw House, on Eutaw st. 

Tanners. 

Appold, Geo. & Co. North st. op. Jail. 
Heald, J. cor. Belvidere and Madison. 
Musgrave, James, Saratoga, bet. Gay 

and Holliday streets, manufacturer of 

Fair Leather. 

Tin Plate and Sheet Iron 

Bradley, U. 3 S. Eutaw st. manufacture: 
of plain tin and japaned ware. 

Bouis, Stephen, 28 Baltimore st. 

Cortlan, Jas., manufacturer of all kind; 
of Tin Ware— importer and dealer in 
Tin Plate, Silver Plated and Britan 
nia Ware, Waiters, Lamps, Cutlery, 
Fancy Hardware, etc., all of whiel: 
he will wholesale or retail on tht 
most reasonable terms, at his stores 
10 Baltimore, and 6 Harrison streets. 

Day, Jacob, N. Gay st. near the Bel A 
market. Roofing, spouting, and job 
work done to order. 

Foreman, Christian, 33 Eutaw st. 

Gross, John, 64 N. Howard st. 

Hass, Conrad, Thames st. F. P. 

Lohmerller, T. Bond St., near Thames. 

Mann, Benj. 34 Pratt st.— constantly on 
hand Brass And irons, Shovels and 
Tongs, Brass and Wire Fenders, Tea 
Boards and Waiters, Brittannia Ware, 
Knives and Forks, together with a 
general assortment of articles suitable 
for Housekeepers. 

Reip, Henry, 8 N. Paca st. 

Robinson & Kremer, 241 Baltimore St. 

Wolf, W. H. cor. Gough and Canal sts. 

Tobacco, Snuff & Segars. 

Adair, Thos. Benj. wholesale dealer in 
Spanish Segars, 6 Commerce St. 

Battee & Lowe, No. 13 Light st. wharf; 
commission merchants and dealers in 
Tobacco. Advances made on con- 
signments. 

Baldwin, John F., 1 N. Gay st. Bridge, 
has constantly on hand leaf and man- 
ufactured Tobacco, Snuff and Segars, 
wholesale and retail. 

Bonn, A. & J. & Bro. 8 Pratt st. oppo- 
site rail road depot. 

Booth, John R. manufacturer of Ha- 
vanna and Principe Segars, cor. Han- 
over and Camden sts. 

Caduc, John, manufacturer of Segars of 
first quality, S. W. cor. of Albemarle 
and E. Pratt sts. 

Degenhard, F. C. Bond st. F.P. 

Dellevie, Samuel, E. Pratt st. near Cen- 
tre Market space. 



Draper, Garrison, 40 Forest st. O.T. 

Ducatel, H. G. 40 Baltimore st 

Ferguson, Benj. W. 9 Franklin st 

Gallaway, Jehu, 2-2 Franklin st 

Gohde, John, 28 Bond St. F.P. 

Hack, J. W. 112 Baltimore^ st 3 doors 
below Calvert, importer of Havana 
Segars, and general dealer in Tobacco, 
Snuff and Segars. 

Heald, W. H. 19 Centre Market space. 

Hewell, Lewis, 47 N. Gay st. O.T. 

Kerner, J. F. cor. Baltimore and High. 

Magers, Elias, 08 Pratt st. 

Myers, Jacob, tobacco manufacturer. 55 
South st. 

Norman & Courtney, wholesale dealers, 
49 S. Gay st. 

Palmer, G. M., N. Gay st. near Bel Air 
market 

Seemuller, A. 6 Baltimore st. 

Smith, Andrew, 270 Baltimore st. im- 
porter and dealer in foreign and do- 
mestic Tobacco, Segars and Snuff. 

Smith, John C. 119 1-2 Baltimore st. 

Starr, R. Liberty st. bet Fayette and 
Lexington. 

Turell, J. & Co. 14 N. Howard st. 

Walker, S. D. & Co. 40 S. Gay st. 

Woldman & Baseler, 137 Hillen st. 

Trimming Stores. 

Bickley, Christopher, 9 Baltimore st 

Cutler, J. S. 69 Baltimore st. 

Dolan, B. 3 Baltimore st. 

Hotl'meister &. Co. 7 S. Liberty st 

Lauer, Lewis, 4 E. Baltimore st. 

l.ovejoy, Amos, 217 Baltimore st 

Lovi-'joy, S. trimming, yarn, hosiery, and 
glove store, 95 Baltimore st 

Manlev.W. E. wholesale trimming store, 
4 Holliday street, importer of patent 
thread, tapes, lacets, galloons, bind- 
ings, boot web, buttons, corset rings, 
spool cotton, hooks and ejes, ribbons, 
wire, pins, etc. etc. 

Mrriiam, J. W. trimming store, and 
wholesale and retail dealer in hosiery, 
gloves, woollen and worsted yarns, 
knitting cottons, embroidering worst- 
ed, patterns, canvass, etc. etc. 

Sisco, Charles, 71 Baltimore st 

Stearns & Sikken, 45 Baltimore st. 

Turners. 

Curlett, Lewis G. Bazaar turning shop, 
Harrison st. is extensively prepared 
to execute every description of work 
in his line, in the neatest and most 
expeditious manner,— having upright 
and circular saws in operation, all 
orders for ripping, scroll work, etc. 
will be executed promptly and in the 
neatest manner; lumber for columns, 
ballustrades, bed posts, etc., together 
with a large assortment of well sea- 
soned gum for hubs, constantly on 



BALTIMORE BUSH 

hand ; bench hand screws, etc., exe- 
cuted to order. 

Miller, John, 48 N. Gay st. 

Mitchell, W., North et, op. Gas House. 

Thomas, J. &, Son, 24 Lexington st. 

Young, C. H. Ensor st near East. 

Umbrellas and Parasols. 

Evans, E. 220 1-2 Baltimore St. above 
Hanover, north side, — where can be 
had the most fashionable parasols and 
umbrellas thatcan be purchased in toil 
or any other city, and where the pro 
prietor respectfully solicits a continu 
ance of pnblic patronage. 

French, John C. 33 South st 

Field, H. B. &. Co. New York manufac- 
turers, and wholesale dealers in um- 
brellas and parasols, 108 Baltimore 6t. 

Undertakers. 

Clemens, A. D., N. Gay st. near Potter. 
Stewart, John, 64 N. Calvert st. 

Upholsterers. 

Birch, Wm. S. 131 Baltimore st. 
Crook, W. jun. 104 Baltimore st. 
Griffith, G.S. <fc Bro. 1001 2 Baltimore st 
Ryland, John, N. Gay st near Front. 
Sholes, T. C. 3 N. Gay st. upholsterery 

of all kinds on hand, or made to order. 
Shyrock, Henry S., Fayette st. opposite 

the Assembly Rooms. 

Variety Stores. 

Benjamin, L. cor. Gay and Harrison sts. 
Pettit, O. F. corner Gay and Exeter sts. 
Roswald, Juda, 66 N. Gay st. 

Venetian Blinds. 

Bean, E. 4 N. Gay st. (near the bridge, 
O. T.) — All orders from the country 
carefully put up ; old bhuds repaired 
and trimmed. 

Dewick, S. D. 30 Harrison st 

Sholes, Thomas C. 3 N. Gay st. 

Shyrock, Henry S. Fayette st. opposite 
the Assembly Rooms. 

Veterinary Surgeon. 

Thorne, Lewis, infirmary, North street, 
corner of Franklin. 

Vinegar. 

Ahrens, A. vinegar depot, wholesale and 
retail, corner of Prench and Forest 
sts. O. T. 

Bodman, William, vinegar and pickling 
house, 57 S. Howard st. 

Rasin, Joseph, general commission mer- 
chant, 108 Dugan's wharf, has con- 
stantly on hand a large supply of vine- 
gar, warranted superior for pickling. 
Hogsheads, barrels, cider, etc. receiv- 
ed in exchange for vinegar. 

Saumenig, Jacob, Howard st near Pratt. 



ESS DIRECTORY. 137 

"Watches, Jewelry, etc. 

Brown, B. 168 1-2 Baltimore st. 

Brown, Wm. 222 Baltimore st. 

Cantield &, Bro. cor. of Baltimore and 
Cliarles sts. — wholesale and retail i 
lers in Watches, Jewelry and Plated 
Ware, Military and Fancy Goods, etc. 

Conner, John, 39 Baltimore st. 

Deloste, Francis, 44 Baltimore st 

Drummond, Levin J. 21 Pratt ft 

Eytinge, S. south Charles near Bait. st. 

Gould, James, 136 Baltimore st 

Heilbrun, Michael 10 Pratt st 

Holloway, Robert, 115 High st O.T. 

Hughes, Aquilla D. 3 North st. 

Jacot, A. 11 1-2 South st. 

Jatho, Henry, 82 Baltimore st. 

Kaltner, F. G. & Co. 63 N. Gay st. 

Keyser, Moses, 2.' Baltimore st.-clocks. 
Watches, Jewelry, etc. wholesale anc! 
retail. 

Meredith, J. P. Paca st. near the Lex 
ington market. 

Morse, R. C. Hanover st. one door from 
Baltimore street, — fine Watches and 
Clocks, of every description, repaired 
and warranted. 

Ninde, James, 9 S. Gay st— Watch and 
Chronometer maker. 

Price, Montgomery H., practical Watcl 
maker, sign of the Mammoth Watch, 
at the old established stand, 62 60utL 
Calvert st M. H. P. devotes his en- 
tire and personal attention, as hereto 
fore, to repairing ail descriptions of 
Watches, Jewelry, Spectacles, Musi 
cal Boxes, etc. etc. Strangers and 
others favoring him with work ma\ 
confidently rely on the same bein;. 
faithfully and punctually attended to. 
For sale, a general assortment of 
Watches, Jewelry, Gold and Silver 
Spectacles, Fancy Articles, ttc. 

Singer, Geo. 30 Fayette st. 

Steele, Samuel, 3.3 Centre Market space. 
Watch maker, Gilder, and Assa\er of 
Silver Plate. 

Trust, Jacob, 2 N. Howard st 

Walter, Jacob, 56 N. Howard st. 

Warner, A. E. 5 N. Gay st. — always on 
hand an assortment of handsome Silvei 
and Plated Ware, of his own macu 
facture. 

Webb, Geo. W. 174 1-2 Baltimore St.. 
manufactures to order, and keeps on 
hand all kinds of Fine Jewelry. Par 
ticular attention will be paid to neat 
ness and durability in the manufac- 
ture and repair of articles in his line 
A large assortment of real and mock 
Stones for setting. 

Watch Makers' Tools. 

Canfield & Bro. wholesale and retail 
dealers in Watch Makers' Tools and 
Materials, Dentists' Files, etc. corner 
of Baltimore and Charles st*. 



BALTIMORE BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



Jacot, A. 11 1-2 South street, importer 
of Watch Makers' Tools and mate- 
rials. 

Wheelwrights. 

Blumer, Aug. cor. Hillen and Potter sts. 
Buchti, John, Wheelwright and Black- 
smith, 43 Harrison st 
Devalin, Hugh, 88 Harrison st 

Whips, etc. 

Beehler, Francis, Whip and Cane ma- 
ker, No. 100 Baltimore street. 

Saul, Joseph W. Whip manufacturer, 
No. 15 Water street, between Calvert 
and South streets. 

Window Glass. 

Baker, William, No. 3 north Liberty st. 
manufacturer and wholesale dealer; 
every description of window glass of 
his own manufacture, constantly on 
hand, and for sale at reasonable pn 
ces. 

Wines and Iaqnors. 

Adair, Thos. B. agent for Blackburn 'i 
celebrated Madena wine, importer and 
wholesale dealer in wines of all kinds, 
brandies, Holland gin, London brown 
stout, Scotch ale, etc. etc.— No. 6 Com- 
merce street. 

Camara, Joze B. da, wine dealer, No. 
9 north Frederick st. — dwelling 65 N. 
Exeter street. 

Dirrenberger, Geo. 37 N. Gay st. 

Flack, Thomas J. surviving partner of 
James Flack & Son, continues the 
rectifying and distilling of brandies, 
gin and cordials, at the old stand, cor. 
of South and Gilford streets ; dwel- 
ling Fountain row, opposite the Eas- 
tern Fountain. 

McColgan, J. & C. dealers in foreign and 
domestic liquors, Saratoga, near Gay 
street. 

Mcllvain, D. importer of wines, bran- 
dies, etc. 38 S. Charles st. 

Oldfield, G. S. Lombard, between Light 
and Hanover sts. 

Thompson, Wm. importer of brandies, 
and wines, 9 South st. 

Wire "Workers. 

Balderston, Wilson, sieve and wire fac 
tory, 9 Light st. wharf, manufactures 
and sells the following articles, viz : 
wire safes of the most approved kinds, 
rolling and standing screens for mer- 
chants' mills and flax seed; riddles 
and sieves, for coal, corn, ore, barley 
rye, oats, flax and clover seeds, wheat, 
cockle, sand, snuif, starch, brick dust, 
etc. — plain and fancy wire work for 
cellar windows, book cases, libraries, 
etc.— also, a general assortment of rat 
and mouse traps, all of which are 
made of the best materials, and will 



be sold as low as at any other manu- 
factory. 

Balderston, Hugh & Son, 12 S. Calvert 
et. — all orders left at the above place, 
or with J. P. Balderston, hardware 
merchant, 19 1-2 Howard st. will be 
carefully attended to. 

Fowler, F. cor. Liberty and Fayette sts. 

Watson, James T. 66 south Calvert st. 
near Pratt, manufactures in the best 
manner, woven wireof ever} 7 descrip- 
tion, such as rolling and standing 
screen wire, for merchants' mills, 
wheat fans, etc. etc.— also, riddles 
and sieveB of every kind, for wheat, 
cockle, garlic, oats, ore, sand, brick 
dust, coffee, coal, clover, flax seed, 
etc. etc. — corn, sand and oyster shell 
screens, patent rat traps, mouse traps, 
bird cages, wire safes, meal and flour 
sieves, made up in the best manner. 
P. S. Orders from a distance attended 
to with despatch. 

Wool Dealer. 

Baynes, Jas. agent, warehouse French 
street, near Front, O. T.; constantly 
on hand, a good assortment of wools, 
graded for manufacturing purposes. 
A fair market price given for domes- 
tic wool, sheep and lamb skins ; dwel- 
ling French street, between High and 
Exeter, O. T. 

Miscellcaneoiis. 

Furniture Carriages. — C. Green, cor- 
ner Hollida}- and Saratoga sts. 

Marine Water Furnisher.— C. Cottrell, 
Great Hughes st. south side basin. 

Millers. — Keller & Corner, 15 Spear's 
wharf. 

Parking Box Makers. — H. Siemers & 
Klaze, Howard st. near Lombard. 

Pilot.— G. W. Tracy, Ann st. F. P. 

Plaster Mill.- J. Sheckells, York st W. 
of Light. 

Screw Dock. — J. Green, agent; dwel- 
ling, Market st. F. P. 

Shipping Master.— Wm. Thompson, 17 
Bond st. F. P. 

Ship Smiths.— C. & C. Hergesheimer; 
shops, Donald's wharf, and Thames 
st. west of Block, F. P. 

Silver and Brass Plater.— H. McLeavy, 
jun. Bank lane, one door from Calvert 
street, and immediately opposite Bar- 
num's Hotel. All kinds of silver and 
brass plating, executed in the best 
manner, and on reasonable terms. 

Skin Dressers.— Ludden & Foltz, Mc 
Clellan st. 

Stone Mason.— S. C. Marshall, N. Gay st. 
above Monument. 

Type and Stereotype Foundry.— Field- 

"ing Lucas, jun. Bank lane. 
Wharfin ger.—T.U. Chase, Chase's whf. 
Thames st. F. P. 



City Government of Washington for 1S13. 129 

W. W. SEATON, Mayor. 

C. H. Wilteerger, Register. iWm. E. Howard, Second Clerk. 
J. H. Bradley, Attorney. A. Roth well, Collector. 
Joseph Radcliff, First Clerk. |Wm. P. Elliott, Surveyor. 

BOARD OF ALDERMEN.— Charlea W. Goldsborough, {President,) John 

D. Barclay, William Orme, John Wilson, John H. Goddard, J. W. Maury, Jas. 
Carberry, James Adams, Samuel Byington, Nathaniel Brady, James Marshall. 
Marmaduke Dove. Erasmus J. Middleton, Secretary. 

BOARD OF COMMON COUNCIL.— Edmund Haniv, (President,) William 
Easby, Wm. Wilson, Win. Radcliff, Lewis Johnson, J. F. Haliday, John C. 
Harkness, Samuel Bacon, Joseph Bryan, J. W. Beck, Simeon Bassett, B. B. 
French, W. P. Ferguson, J. S. Miller, J. T. Van Keswick, James Crandell, E. 
W. Clarke, G. H. Fulmer. Richard Barry, Secretary. 

Henry H. Lowe, Inspector of Tobacco; Jacob Kleiber, Inspector of Flour ; 
Win. M. MeCauley, Sealer of Weights and Measures. 



SOCIETIES AND INSTITUTIONS. 



Banks, Officers, etc. 

Bank of the Metropolis. — Disc. Monday. J. P. Van Ness, Pre- 
sident; Richard Smith, Cashier; George M. Davis, Teller; W. E. C 
Bookkeeper; C. E. Rittenhouse, Discount Clerk; Jame3 Fitzpatrick, Porter. 

DIRECTORS. 
J. Boyle, James Thompson, Lewis J. Mason, Thomas Carbery, J. W. Miury, 

George Parker, George W. Graham, N. P. Causin, Charles Hill. 

Bank of Wasiiinc ton.— Disc. Tuesday. Wm. Gunton, President ; 

James Adams, Cashier; Hugh B. Sweenv" Teller ; S. B. Boarman, Book 
keeper; W. Costin. Porter. DIltEC T R S . 

George BomCord, Stans. Murray, EJ\\ i: 1 £ V ■ A. Dickins, A. Hender- 
son, Edward Dyer, Jacob Gideon," John P. Ingle, Samuel Burche. 

Patriotic Bank.— Disc. Thursday. Wm. A. Bradley, President; 

C. Bestor, Cashier; John R. Nourse, Teller; James Maukin, Runner. 
DIRECTORS. 

P. Bradley, G. C. Grammar, Wm. Stettinius, E. Lindsley, Thomas Blagden. 
R. A. Johnston, Wm. H. Gunnell, J. F. Caldwell. 

Insurance Companies. 

Firemens' Insurance Company of Washington and George- 
town.— James Adams, President; Alexander Mclntire, Secretary. 

Franklin Insurance Company.— Office, south side Pennsylvania 
Avenue, opposite Gadsby's Hotel. G. C. Grammar, President; "William Stet- 
tinius, Secretary. 

Courts in tlie District of Columbia. 

Circuit Court.— William Cranch, Chief Judge ; Buekner Thrus- 

ton and James S. Morsell, Assistant Judges. 

Holds its sessions in Washington County fourth Mondays in November and 
March, yearly. In Alexandria County, first Mondays in May and October. 
Criminal Court.— James Dunlop, Judge. Holds its sessions in 

Washington County on the second Monday in March, first Monday in June, 
fourth Monday in October, and the last Monday in December In Alexandria 
County, on the first Mondays in April and November. 

Alexander Hnnter, Marshal; William Brent, Clerk of the Courts of Wash- 
ington County ; Ca^sius F. Lee, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Alexandria 
County ; Edmund J. Lee, Clerk of the District Courtjbr Alexandria County. 

Orphan's Court.— Nathaniel P. Causin, sole Judge. The Or- 
phan's Court sits every Tuesdav and Friday in each week. 

Edward N. Roach, Register of Wills and Clerk to the Orphan's Court. 



130 



OC1ETIES 



nstitution: 



Washington City Post Office. 

Corner of C and llth streets, under CarusVs Assembly Rooms. 
William Jones, Postmaster ; George Sweeney, Jlsst. Postmaster. 

Open for business daily, (except Sunday,) from 7 A. M. till sundown ; on that 
day it will be open from 7 to 10 A. M. and from 1 to 2 P. M. 

The mail boats Sidney aud Augusta leave Washington for Potomac Creek al- 
ternately every morning, at 11 1-2 A. M. or immediately after the arrival of the 
cars and mail from Baltimore. 

Religious and Charitable Societies. 

CHURCHES AND MINISTERS IN WASHINGTON. 
Roman Catholic. 



CHURCHES. LOCATION 



St. Patrick's, 
St. Joseph's, 
St. Matthew's, 



St. John' 

Trinity, 

Christ, 



Foundry Chapel 
Wesley Chapel, 



MINISTERS. 



RESIDENCE. 



Cor. Fst. N. & 10 Rev. Wm. Matthews, Adjoin'" Church. 
Capitol Hill, Rev. Jos. Van Worsigh, Near the Church. 

Cor. 15 and H sts Rev. Jno. Donelan. Adjoin'g Church. 

Protestant Episcopal. 

I' President square I Rev. Wm. Ha wley, I Pa. av. near tr. b. 

5th st. near C. H. Rev. H. Strhigfellow, 5th st. near Ch. 
Near Navy Yard, | Rev. H. H. Bean. I Adjoin'g Church. 

Methodist Episcopal. 

1 Cor. 14th and G. IRev. Jno. Robb, IGst.nearCh. 

iCor. 5thand F. IRev. Jno. Davis, |5th st. adj. Ch. 

Methodist Protestant. 



Ninth st. Church, |9th st. bet. C & F|Rev. A. A. Lipscomb. 

Presbyterian. 

4 1-2 street iRev. Chas. Rich, 

Rev. C. Van Ransellear, 
F st. bet. 14 & 15 Rev. Jas. Laurie, D.D. 
9th st. bet. G & H | Rev. Jno. C. Smith. 

Baptist. 

D st. near C. I 

10th st bet E & F Rev.. O. B. Brown, 

Va. av. near Ny.y. Rev. A. Webb. 



First, 

Second, (O. S.) 
F street, do. 
Fourth. 



I Mi. av. & 41 2 st 



C st. east 4 1-2 st 



Pa. av. near 15 st 
N. Y. av. near 9th 



Shiloh, 

First, 

Second, 
African, 



Cor. rath & I sts. | 

Unitarian. 

Unitarian, ICor. La. av. & 6lRev. L. G. Bulfinch. I 

Odd Fellows. 

The society consists of a Grand Lodge and seven subordinate Lodges, viz. — 
Central, Washington, Columbia, Eastern, Union, Harmony and Potomac. The 
Central, Washington and Columbia meet in the City Hall ;— Eastern, Union 
and Harmony meet at the Navy Yard ;- -Potomac, in the room over the Market 
house, in Alexandria. The Potomac Lodge is building a Hall, near the Court 
house, Alexandria. The children of deceased members are educated at the ex- 
pense of the Lodges. There is an encampment of Patriarchs attached to these 
Lodges, consisting of 70 members. 

American Colonization Society, — Formed for colonizing, with 

their own consent, the free people of color residing in the U. S., in Africa. — 
Any citizen of the United States may become a member by paying one dollar. 
Meets annually, at Washington, on the 3d Tuesday in January. Hon. Henry 
Clay, president; Rev. Wm. McLain, acting secretary; office, Penn. av. 
bet. 3d and 4 1 2 sts. 



SOCIETIES 



NSTI TU' 



131 



Iiiterary and Scientific Societies. 

National Institution for the Promotion of Science — Estab- 
lished in May, 18-40. Has the ue of the National Gallery of the Patent Office, 
which citizens and strangers have the privilege of visitingand examining the 
curiosities. Resident meinuprs. U',o ; honorary members, 20; corresponding 
paying members., 23 . corresponding members, :iiij. Hun. J. K. Poineet, pres- 
ident ; Col . P. Force, \ ice pre idenl ; K. Markoe, jun. cor, and P. Thompson, 
recording secretary ; Win. J. Stone, treas. ami H. King, Curator. Directors 
on the part of the Government— Hon. D. Webster, Hon. Walter Forward, 
Hon. J. C, Speni er. Hon. A. P. Dpslror, Hon. c. A. Wickliffe, Hon. H. L. Le- 
gare. Directors on the part of the Institution — Hon. J. Q. Adams, Hon. W. 

C. Preston, Col. J. J. Ahert, Col. J. Totten, A. 0. Daj ton, Esq., Com. L. War- 
rington. 

Union Literary and Debating Society, — Founded in 1821 for 
the promotion of literature. The exercises consist of lectures, debates, etc. — 
Meets everj Wednesday evening, in the Medical College, cor. 10th and E. sts. 
James Hoban, president; Alex. Dimitry and R M. Harrison, vice presidents ; 
J. 11. Lang, recording, and B. B. French, corresponding secretary; N. Callan, 
jun. treasurer. 

Franklin Association, — Organized Nov. 19, 1839, for mental im- 
provement. Meets over the Washington Library, llthst-bet. Penn.av.and 
C st. D. Han Ion, president; T. Martin, vice president; L- Muller, sec. and 

D. Moore, treas. 

Columbian College,— Situated one and a half mile north of the 

city, upon an eminence commanding a tine view of the Potomac river, Mount 
Vernon, etc. 

Medical. 

Medical Department of Columbian College, situated at the eor. 

of 10th and E sts. equidistant from ths Capitol and President's house. Two 
students from each state may he admitted gratuitously, if unable to pay the 
charges of the Institution. The College was incorporated bj an act of con- 
gress. Thos. Sewall, M.D Prof. Pathology and Pra. ti< e of Medicine; H. 
Lindsly, M.D. Prof. Obstetrics and Disei es oJ Women and Children; Th. 
Miller, M. D. Prof, of Anatomy and Physiology; J. M. Thomas. M.I). Prof. 
Mat. Med and II • ■ rp< uticaj J. Fred. May, ML. D. Prof Surgery ; Fr. Hall, 
M.I). Prof. Chemistry and Pharmacy, S. C. Smoot, M.D. Demonstrator of 
Anatomy. 

Military Companies. 



NAMES. 



Washington Light Infautr 
National Blues, - 
Mechaateal Rdlemen, 
Marion do. 

Columbian Artillery, 
Potomac Diagoons, - 



CAPTAINS. 



R. France, 

L. G.Middleton, 

- Williams, - 

— Mi Cauley, 
C. Buckingham, 
J. Mason, 



LIE UTS. 



J. P. McEeaa. 

F. A. Tucker. 

— McClelland. 

— Ellis. 
Isaac Beers. 

— Bomford. 



Temperance Societies 




SOCIETIES. 


PRESIDENT. 


SECRETARY. 


Freemens' Vigilant Total Abstinence, 


George Savage, 


J. S. Clagett. 


Washington Citv Total Abstinence, 






Wesley Cbapel Total Abstinence, - 


E. Landsdale, 


John M. Dunn. 


Navy Yard Total Abstinence, 


Peter Pierson, 




Young Mens' Total Abstinence, 


D. F. Howard, 


— Ti%-erlv. 


Northern Libetties Total Abstinence, 


B. Evans, 


C. P. Wannell. 


Western Total Abstinence, 


— Harrison, - 




Greenleaf 's Point Total Abstinence, 


D. Billey, 




Cathoiie Total Abstinence, 


Wm. Ward, - 


P. Caton. 



133 



WASHINGTON BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Columbia Typographical Society,— Organized Jan. 1, 1815.— 
Meets in the Perseverance Engine House. J. F. Halliday, president; Wm. 
Woodward, vice president; A. T. Cavis, sec. 

Washington Beneficial Soc. of Journeymen Cordwainers— 

Men's Branch— Organized 1824. C. Spence, president; M. Gassaway, vice 
president; \V. Bond, sec. Meets 3d Mondays, in every month, at Franklin 
Coffee House, cor. 8th and D sts. 



WASHINGTON BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Apothecaries. 

Barry, James, 8th, near K st. 

Callan, J. F. & Co. N. E. cor. E and 7th. 

Clark, E.W. cor. 7th and L sts. 

Eliot, W. & Co. corner F and 12th st?. 

Farquhar & Morgan, Pa. av. near the 7 

buildings. 
Gilman, Z. D. north side Pa. av. near 

Brown's Hotel. 
Harbaugh, V. cor. 7th and G sts. 
James, C. H. cor. Pa. av. and 14th sts. 
Jardella, C. T. cor. 12th st. and Pa. av. 
Patterson, R. S. cor. Pa. av. and 9th st. 
Stott, Charles, cor. Pa. av. and 7th st. 
Watkins, T. cor. Pa. av. and 4 1-2 st. 
Young, J. &W. Pa.av. 2 doors east of 

Gadsby's. 
Young, Jas. jr. & Co. cor. 3 st. and Pa. av 

Attorneys. 



Bakers. 

Havenner, T. & Son, C st. rear Gadsby's. 
Krafft, John M., N.W. cor. F and 12 sts. 
Magee, S. 7th, between G and H sts. 
Andrew, cor. E and 11th sts. 
Tolson, John F. north side Pa. av. be- 
tween 12th and 13th st3. 

Billiards. 

Fassett, James, Pa. av. op. Gadsby's. 
Prevostfe Wallingsford, Pa.av. near4 1-2 

Blacksmiths. 

Buckingham, C, C st. op. City Post O. 
Burns, F. 6th st. above C. 
Conner, T. Pa. av. W. of 7 buildings. 
Foy, A. 4 1-2 st. above Pa. av. 
Hunter, M. 7th st. between H and I. 
Kleindienst, S., C st. N.of R. R. Depot 
Martin, J. W. cor. 11th and E sts. 



Bradley, J. H. La. av. op. City Hall. 
Brent, Wm. L. law office eastern wing 
City Hall.— Residence, Brown's Ho'l. 
Carlisle, J. M. office 33 E. wing City Hall. 
Coxe, R. S. south side F st between 6th 

and 7th sts. 
Dent, H. H. west side 4 1-2 st near C. H. 
Digges, D. C. Upper Blarlboro, Prince 

George Co., Md. 
Fendall, P. R. District Att'y of the U. S. 
Giberson, Gilbert L. 6th street, opposite 

Gadsby's Hotel. 
Hall, D. A. office west wing City Hall. 
Hoban, J. La. av. op. City Hall. 
Hellen, Johnson, cor. D. and 5th sts. 
Jones, W. west side 3d st above Pa. av. 
Lenox, W. La. av. near new Assembly 

Rooms. 
May, Henry, office W. wing City Hall. 
Merrick, Matthews, cor. D and 5th sts. 
Morfit, H. M. 4 1-2 st. above Pa. av. 
Smith, Bayard, opposite City Hall. 
Swann & Swann,— office La. av. near 

City Hall. 
Wallack, R. La. av. op. City Hall. 

Avictioneers and. Com- 
mission Merchants. 

Dyer & Wright, north side Pa. av. be- 



I Roper,' E. H., E st. betw. 12 and 13. 

y- 



tween 10th and 11th sts. 

Marshall, Wm. north side 

tween 9th and 10th sts. 



Weyrich, J. 7th st. between H and I 

Booksellers & Stationers. 

Anderson, G. Pa.av. betw. 11 and 12 sts. 
Baj ly , Wm. F., agent for J. R. Herrick, 

Pa. av. between 12th and 13th sts. 
Farnham, R. cor. Pa. av. and 11th sts. 
Fischer, Wm. Pa. av. near 12th st. 
Kennedy, J. Pa. av. 3 doors E. 13th st 
Mark, J. Pa. av. betw. 3d and 4 1-2 sts. 
Morrison, Wm. M. Pa. av. 4 doors west 

of Brown's Hotel. 
Palmer, J. T. 9th st. between Pa. av. 

and D st dealer in stationery and 

music. 
Riordan J. north side Pa. av. between 

4 1-2 and 6th sts. 
Taylor, F. Pa. av. E. of Gadsby's. 

Bookbinders. 

Anderson, R. P. cor. Pa. av. and 11 st 
Blake, J. A. Pa. av. S. side, between 14th 

and 15th sts. 
Gideon, J. & G. S. 9th st above Pa. av. 
Sergeant, J., D st betw. 9th and 10th. 

Boot and Shoe Makers. 

Anderson, J. Pa. av. betw. 14th and 15th. 
Bayne, T. 8th st. E. op. Marine Garrison. 
Butler, Wm„ S. side Pa. av. W. of 12 st. 
Call, A. & Son, S. side Pa. av. between 

. 6th and 7th sts. 



WASHINGTON BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



133 



Clarke, W. Pa. av. btw. 8th and 9th sts. 
Cull, J. 8th st. E. near the Navy Yard. 
Cross, H. L. Pa. av. btw. 19 and 20 sts. 
Douglass, Wm., S. side Pa. av. between 

9th and 10th sts. 
Gahan, Wm., E st. btw- f.th and 7th 
Goldin, J.cor. 8 and E near Gen'l P.O. 
Harper, W., N. side Pa. av. btw. 8 and 9 
Hoover, Andrew, south side Pa. av.be 

tween 6th and 7th sts., and near the 

seven buildings. 
Lacy, E. Pa. av. btw. 4 1-2 and 6th sts. 
Lang, John H. Pa. av. between 8th and 

9th sts. op. W. Centre Market. 
Leydane, P., W. side 7 st. betw. H and I. 
Mitchell, T. Pa. av. near Brown's Hotel. 
Noyes, William St Sons, wholesale and 

retail dealers. La. av. — dwelling West 

st. Georgetown. 
Sexsmith, J., N. side Pa. av. between 

9th and 10th sts. 
Spillman, T. cor. Pa. av. and 18th sts. 
Stores, W. K. & Co. south side Pa. av. 

opposite Brown's Hotel. 
Thumlert, Wm., S. side Pa. av. near 6th. 
White, J. C, N. side Pa. av. one door 

from 12th St. 
Whitney, .1. Pa. av. btw. 14 and 15 sts 
Whitney &. Griffin, south side Pa. av. 

between 6th and 7th sts. 
WoMard, James, F. cor. 6th and G sts. 

Bricklayer. 

Birch, Wm. S., F. st opposite the Ca- 
tholic Church, is prepared to execute 
all kinds of jobbing in his line of busi- 
ness. Particular attention paid to set- 
ting grates, furnaces, cookeries, etc. 
All work warranted to give satisfac- 
tion, and grates to draw well, or no 
charge. Constantly on hand, a gene 
ral assortment of the very best mate 
rials used in his line of business, which 
will be furnished to order at reasona- 
ble prices. 

Brokers— Lottery $ Exchange. 

Fairthild, L. cor. Pa. av. and 3d st 

France, R. cor. Pa. av. and 6th st 

France, John, Pa. av. betw. 12 and 13. 

France, L. H. Pa. av. near Gadsby's. 

France, James, Pa. av. 3 doors E.of 13. 

Hands. John, Pa. av. near Fuller's Hot. 

Howison, H. Pa. av. near Brown's Hot 

Lee, A., N. side Pa. av. E. of Gadsby's. 

Maury, J. W. Pa. av. 1 door E. of Gads- 
by's Hotel. 

McCauley, G. Pa. av. betw. 11 and 12. 

Phillips, J. B. Pa. av. near Brown's. 

Provest, Alex. Pa. near 4 1-2 st. 

Rice, W. H. Pa. av. N. side, near 4 1-2. 

Ritter, J. H., N. side Pa. av, betw. 9 and 
lOstd. 

Stock and Exchange. 
Corcoran & Riggs. cor. 15 and F sts. 
Fowler,C. S. & Co. Pa. av. near Brown's. 



Nourse, C. J cor. Pa. av. and 13th st 
Pairo, T. F. loth st. op. Trea^. Depart. 

Cabinet Makers. 

Boyd, Jos. K., N. side Pa. av.near 11th. 
Green, Edwin, cor. C and 10th sts. 
Cripps, Wm. M. L. 11th st. near Pa. av. 
Cook, Leonard O. cor. 9th and D sts. 
Stillins, John, cor. 7th st. east and L st 

near Navy Yard. 
Wheeler, G. W. Pa. av. between 17th 

and 18th sts, 
Williams, Jas., N. side Pa. av. near 4 1-2. 
Williams, L. Pa. av. near War Depart. 

Carpenters. 

Birch, B. cor. 8th and D sts. 
Cooper, L. N. cor. E and 11th st3. 
Downer, Joel, E St. between 6th and 

7th, superintendent of General Post 

Office. 
Drake, W. 11th st. btw. E and F. 
Harkness, J. C. 7th, betw. D and E sts. 
Hurtz, P. 7th, between D and E sts. 
Hyde, Thos. V. Pa. av. and 11th st. 
Mobun, W. P. 6lh st. btw. C and La. av. 
Munro, David, S. E. cor. 12th and E sts. 
Thomson, Joseph, cor. E and 9th sts. 
Towles, J. 8th st. op. Gen'l Post Office. 
Wise, John H. 12th st. near E. 

China. Glass, etc. 

Morgan, J. B., N. side Pa. av. between 

8th and 9th sts. 
Pursell, Thomas, south side Pa. av. op. 

Brown's Hotel. 

Coach. Makers. 

Donaphan, W. T. cor. 11th and E. 
Haslup, L. cor. Pa. av. and 13th st. 
Keefe, Wm. cor. 18th and I sts. 
McDermot, M. Pa.av.btw 3d and 4 1-2. 
Young, T. Pa. av. betw. 3d and 4 1-2 sts. 

Confectioners. 

Barnes, H ., N. side Pa. av. btw. 3 and i\ 

Beardsley, J. north side Pa. av. between 
12th and 13th streets. 

Eberbach, J. H. Pa. av. bet. 12 and 13. 

Fitzgerald, J. north side Pa. av. be- 
tween 3d and 4 12 sts. 

Funk, Nicholas, Pa. av. op. W. Market. 

Kindiy, P. south side Pa. av. between 
10th and 11th sts. 

Knott, G. A., N. side Pa. av. between 
4 1-2 and 6th sts. 

Lafon,C, N. side Pa. av. betw. 9 and 10 

Murphy, Jeremiah J. north side Pa. av. 
between 9th and 10th f-ts. 

Mclnerny , D., N. side Pa. av. near4 1-2. 

Ronckent'orft', M. north side Pa. av. E. 
of Gadsby's. 

Dentists. 

Clark, Sam'l, 11th st. 1 door above Pa. 

av., and Bridge St., Georgetown. 
Gunnell, J. S., M. D„ President's Sq're. 



134: 



WASHINGTON BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Hayden, C.,E st. near Pa. av. 
Mavnard, K. Pa. av. betw. 11 and 12 sts. 
MrConnell, Win. P. cor. Pa.av. and 2d. 
Ritter, J. H., N, side Pa.av. bet. 9 and 10. 
Van Patten, C. H-, M. D., north side 
Pa. av. near Brown's Hotel. 

Dry Goods. 

Adams & McPherson, Pa. av. between 

8th and 9th sts. 
Allen, J. & G. F. fancy and staple dry 

goods, Pa.av. between 9th & lOtb sts. 
Barnes, T. T. La. av. betw. 7th and 8th. 
Bradley & Estep, La. av. between 7th 

and 8th sts. 
Briscoe & Clark, N. side Pa. av. west of 

Brown's Hotel. 
Clark, Isaac, N. side Pa. av. near 8th st. 
Carter, H. cor of Pa. av. and 8th st. 
Clagett, D. corner 9th and Pa. av. 
Clark, J. 15. Pa. av. near 8th st. 
Combs, R. M. 8th st. near Navy Yard. 
Drury, John H. Pa. av. op. 7 buildings. 
Egan, W., S. side Pa. av. betw. and 7. 
Hall & Bro. La. av. betw. 7th and 8th. 
Kennedy, John. Pa. av. three doors east 

of 13th street, constantly on hand, su- 
perior cotton wrapping twine, zephyr 

worsted and patterns. 
Onne, W. C. Pa. av. west of Brown's. 
Riley & Perry, cor. Pa. av. and 8th st. 
Stettmius, Win. & Geo. Pa. av. west of 

Brown's Hotel. 
Perry & Ashbv, La. av. betw. 7 and 8. 
Wallace, Shaw &, Co. La. av. near 8th. 
Wall & Sasscer, cor. La. av. and 7th sts. 
White & Bro., S. side Pa. av. between 

6th and 7th sts. 
Waters, John, N. side Pa. av , between 

9th and 10th sts. 
Wingerd & Bradley, La. av. between 

7th and 8th sts. 

Dyers. 

Bell.W., S. side Pa. av. btw. 3 and 4 1-2. 
Denham, L. L., S. side Pa. av. between 

9th and 10th sts. 
Smith & Bowen, N. side Pa. av. between 

4 1-2 and 6th sts. 
Wilson. Henrv, N. side Pa- av. between 

3d and 4 1-2 sts. 

Engravers. 

Chambers, B. Pa av. between 9 and 10, 
Hare, D. O. seal engraver, Pa. av.betw. 

12th and 13th sts. 
Howell, J. H., N. side Pa. av. near 4 1-2 
Smith, W., N. side Pa. av. bet. 9 and 10. 
Stone, W. I. engraver and copperplate 

printer, corner D and 11th sts. 
Throop, J. V. N., Mo. av. between 4 1-2 

and 6th sts. 

Fancy & Variety Stores. 

Chambers, B.,N. side Fa. av. between 

9th and 10th sts. 
Clitch, F., N. side Pa. av. between 9th 

and 10th sts. 



Jenkins, A. R.,N. side Pa.av. near 4 1-2. 

Parker, Selby, ornamental hair, perfu- 
mery, and fancy goods, N. side Pa av. 
between 9th and 10th sts. 

Savage, George, N.side Pa. av. between 
9th and 10th sts. 

Florists and Seedsmen. 

Buist, Wm. cor. N. Y. av. and 12th st. 
Callan, J. F. &. Co. seedsmen, corner of 

E and 7th sts. 
Douglas, John, cor. 15th and G sts. near 

Treasury Department. 

Flonr and Feed. 

Ford & Chapman, agents, 7th street,. 

Hoover's block, and cor. of 7th and 

B st. Creole wharf. 
Culverwell, R. J. A. 7th, near I st. 

Grocers, 

Wholesale and Retail. 
Addison, A. cor. La. av. and 7th st — 

groceries and liquors. 
Ailier & Thy son, 7th, betw. H and I. 
Allen, Win. La. av. betw. 6 and 7 sts. 
Beall & Morsell, S. side Pa. between 

4 1-2 and 6th sts. 
Brown, P. H., F st. near Treas. Build. 
Brown, S. & Co. cor. 7th st. and Pa. av. 
Burger, Wm. B. temperance grocer, 

cor. 7th and E sts. 
Callan, N. sen-, F st. nearTreas. Build. 
Cai others, A- cor F and 11th sts. west. 
Coburn, J. 17th st near War Depart'nt. 
Collins, J. H. Md.av. near long bridge. 
Cruit, R., F st. btw. 14th and loth. 
Delano, Wm. J. cor. N Y. av. and 12 st. 
Donohoo, J. A. cor. 7th and D sts., and 

Pa. av. betw. 3d and 4 1-2 sts. 
Dove, Wm, Pa. av. N side, between 

12th and 13th sts. 
Duvall, S. cor. Pa. av. and 20th st 
Dunn, Francis A. 7th, above I st 
Evans, Wm. Md. av. square 267, near 

Potomac Bridge. 
Goddard. J. H. 7th, near G st. 
Graff, Wm. & Co. F st near Treasury 

Building. 
Given, James E., N. side Pa. av. east 

of rail road depot. 
Harvey, J. S. cor. Md. av. and 13 1-2 st. 
Jackson, B. L- & Bro. S. side Pa. av. 

between 6th and 7th, 
King, Martin, corner of I and 7th, east. 
Lambright & Crandell, N. side Pa. av, 

between 3d st, and rail road depot. 
Laub, W. B, corner 15th and F sts. 
Lipscomb, G. 7th st. op. Patriotic bank. 
Lezeijby, D. L. corner 7th and I sts. 
Lord, Wm. corner 5th and G sts, N. L. 
Midilleton & Beall, S, side Pa. av. oppo- 
site Gadshy's Hotel. 
Naylor, D. corner D and 13 1-2 sts. 
Orme, Wm., N. side Pa. av, near 11th. 
Purden, J.jun. 12th, above G St. 
Ka.idali, G. A. W. cor. Pa. av. and 12th. 



WASHINGTON BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



Reed, B. W., S. W. corner F and 13th. 

Ryon & Catlett, La, av. betw. 6 and 7. 

Redfern, S. corner Pa. av. and 19th St, 

Spalding, S., S. W. cor. 12th and (i Bt8. 

Simms, Elexius, corner F and i:jth sts, 

Stewart, (.. W. corner H and 12th Bts, 

StOtt, 8. 20th st. and Pa. av., south side. 

Tench, S. corner 8th and K east, near 
Navy Yard. 

Thomby, T. corner 8th, east, and f Bta. 

Thumlert, James E. Water st. Steam 
Boat landing. 

Upperman, Wm. H. north fide Pennsyl- 
vania avenue, between 3d and 4 1-2. 

Trimble, Matthew, 7th st, near Long br. 

Gun and Locksmiths. 

Bitner.W. G. Pa. av. between 17 and L8. 

Crome, J. locksmith and bell hanger 

15th st. opposite Treasurj Depart. 
Hodgkin, J. W. cor. 6th Btand La. av. 
Muui-k. <i. H., I). Bt, betw. 6th and 7th. 
Werner, J. H. T. La, av. betw. 6 and 7. 
Schneider, Lewis H. patent lever lock 

maker, south side Pa. av. between 

10th and 11th Bts. 
Boteler, P. locksmith and bell hanger, 

corner 6th st and Pa. av. 

Hair Dressers. 

Cary, I. N. 6 St. opposite Gadsby's. 

Chirk, K. (J. Pa. av. opposit 7 buildings. 

Mi; r,A.,N side Fa. av. near 4 1-2. 

Orbbs, J. H. 6th Bt. (Gad by's Hotel,) 
constantly on hand and for Bali 
eral assortment of perfumer] and fan 
ey goods, shirts, Bcarfs, cravats, Btocks, 
collars, suspenders, gloves, bandker 
chiefs, etc etc. Wigs, toupees and 
scalps, made to order at the shorte.>t 
notice, 

Lee, W. T., K. W. cor. F. and 14th. 

Wilkin* & Warick, N. side Pa av.betw. 
3d and 4 1-2 sts. 

McCubbin, Edward, 8th st. between Pa. 
av. and D sts. 

Hardware. 

Campbell & Coyle, Pa. av. op. Brown's. 
Ingle &, Palmer, N. side Pa. av, between 

8th and 9th sts. 
Lindsley, E., N. side Pa. av. between 

>»th and 10th sts. 
ii >, de, John, cor. N. J. av. and 7th st 
Savage, G., Pa. av. between 9 and 10 sts. 

Hats, Caps, etc. 

Handy, S. W. Pa. av. between Brown's 

and Gadsby's. 
Mtaguire, J. 7th st. op. Patriotic Bank. 
Todd, W. B. doors west of Brown's. 
Wilson. Wm., N. side Pa. av. between 

8th and 9th sts. 



Instrument Makers. 

Patton, R. & Son, instrument makers to 
the I" nited States Government, lltl, 
Btrei ;. opposite the city post office. 

Intelligence and General 
Agency. 

O'Brian, John F. intelligence and gene 
ral agency oflice, La. av. opposite the 

Bank ol Washington, where situations 
of every description are procured, and 
servants of all kinds obtained. 

liace and Fancy Goods, 

Marshall, Mrs., 8. = ide Pa. av. between 

9th and 10th sts. 
\ i ier, J. agent, Pa. av. 4 doors east of 

Gadsby's. 

Leather Dealers. 
Kibbev, Wm. B.,S, Bide Pa, av. betw 

6th and 7th BtS. 
Pilling, J. 8th it. 1 door above Pa. av. 

Lithographers. 

Fendrick, C. Pa. av.betw. 10 and 11 sts 
Hass, Philip, Pa, av. near the Capitol 



H. R. north side Pa. av. be- 
and 4 1-2 bts. 



Robinson 

tween 

Lumber, Wood & Coal. 

Harvey, J. S. cor. 10».h and E sts. 
Shaw & Bay, 14th st. near the Canal. 
Shepperd A. 7th st. Market space. 
Thorn, Henry, Tth st. betw, D and E. 

Magistrates. 

(lark, J. T)., S. side Pa. av. near 13th st 

Coote, C. T. cor. C and 6th sts. 

Hampton, T. R. north side Pa. av. be- 
tween 3d and 4 1-2 sts. — attends to 
business alter 3 o'clock, P. M. 

Morsel I, B.K. La. av.op. the Bank of W. 

Thompson, Wm. office La, av. opposite 
the Unitarian Church. 

Giberson, G. L. 6th st. op. Gadsby's. 

Marble Manufacturers. 

Griffith & O'Brien, cor. 9th and E sts. 
Pepper, J, P., S. side Pa. av. opposite 

Gadsby's Hotel. 
Stegagnmi, L. Pa. av, cor. 1st st. 

Milliners. 

Ash wood, Miss, S. side Pa. av. between 

9th and loth sts. 
Finley, Mrs. south side Pa. av. between 

9th and 10th sts,— Millinery, artificial 

flowers, etc. 
Hill, Mrs., N. side Pa. av. betw, 9 and 10. 
Lamphier, Mrs. south side Pa. av. betw. 

9th and 10th sts. 
McDonnel, Miss A„ S. side Pa. av. btw. 

House Furnishers. 9th and loth sts. 

Boteler & Donn, Pa. av. op. Brown's. Morley, Mis?, north side Pa. av. betw. 
Boteler & Waring, 7th street, opposite 9th and 10th sts. 

Patriotic Bank. | Nelson, Miss, S. side Pa. av. E. of 4 1-2. 



136 



WASHINGTON BUSINES 



D IE C TORY. 



Reeder, Elizabeth, corset maker, nth 

St., above Pa. av. 
Sexsmith, Mrs. south side Pa. av. betw. 

9th and 10th sts. 
Wheeler, Adelaide, mantuamaker, 20th 

st. betw. G and H sts. 

Newspapers. 

Army and Navy Chronicle,— by A. Bar 
nard — weekly. 

Globe, by Blair & Rives. Daily, $10- 
semi-weekly, $5— weekly, $2 — Con- 
gressional Globe during a session, $1— 
appendix to do., $1. 

Independent, by Pleasants, Johnson and 
Woodson — semi- weekly, 

Madisonian, by J. B. Jones. Daily, $10 
— tri-weekly, $5— weekly, $2. 

National Intell igencer, by Gales & Sea 
ton, Dailv, $10— country paper, $6. 

True Whig, "by C. Colton— weekly, $1. 

Union Democrat, by Amos Kendall, $2 

The Marlboro Gazette is printed weekly 
by Geo. W. Wilson, Upper Marlboro, 
Prince George's County, Md., at $3.00 
per annum, and offers great advanta 
ges as an advertising medium for bu 
tiness men in Baltimore and Washing 
ton Cities ; advertisements inserted 
at moderate rates. 

Notaries Public, Land 
Agents, etc. 

Caustin, J. H., F st. near Trea. Depart. 
King & Wilson, F St. betw. 14 and 15 



Johnson, Lewis & Callan, Nicholas, Jr- 
F street between 14th and 15th sts. 

Murray, Charles, I5th street opposite 
Treasury Department. 

Painters. 

Clements & Murray, Pa. av. between 
17th and 18th sts. 

O 'Brian, James, house, sign and orna- 
mental painter, corner of 13th st. and 
Pa. av. up stairs, directly over Major 
C.J.Nourse's exchange office.— En- 
trance to paint shop on 13th st, 

Payne, T. 11th, betw. Pa. av. and E st. 

Porter, W. F-, D st. betw. 9th and 10th. 

Stallings, John P. cor. 12th and E sts, 

Taylor, G. W. south side Pa. av, betw. 
12th and 13th st*. 

Periodicals. — Agencies. 

Hampton, R. T. Pa. av. between 3rd 
and 4 1-2 sts. (3 doors east of Beer's 
American Hotel,) newspaper and pe- 
riodical agency. — Nearly every period- 
ical, and the most popular papers 
furnished by the year or single num- 
ber. Accounts collected for publish- 
ers and others. 

Jenkins, Andrew R. National Reading 
Room, 1 door W. of American Hotel. 

Luff, F. Washington City Periodical and 
Newspaper store, next door to Brown- 
ing's tailoring establishment, N. Bide 
Pa. av. betw. 3d and 4 1-2 sts. 



Public Houses. 



N UIF.S OF iioi;sks. 



American Hotel, 

City Hotel, 

Columbian Hotel, 

Farmers and Citizens Hotel, 

Indian Queen Hotel, 

National Hotel, 

Steam Boat Hotel, 

Steam Boat Hotel, 

Union Hotel, 

Virginia and Farmers House, 



LOCATION. 



Pa. av. btw. 3d and 4 1-2 sts. 
Pa. av. betw. 14 and 15 sts. 
C st. betw. 4 1-2 and 6 sts. 
Navy Yard Hill, 
Pa. av. betw. (3th and 7th, 
Pa. av. corner 6th street, 
7th street, near Pa. av. 
Steam Boat Landing, 
F st. betw. 12th and 13th, 
C street, rear of Gadsby's. 



PROPRIETORS 



Refrectories, etc. 



American and French Restauxat 

Favier's Restaurater, 

Foy's Refectory, 

Franklin Coffee House, 

Fletcher's, 

Globe Hotel, 

Head Quarters, 

Log Cabin House. 

Northern Liberty Hotel, 

Stewart's Tavern, 

Star Coffee House, 

Square -nd Compass, 

Tneatre and Franklin House, 

Third V a/d Lunch, 



Pa. av. opposite Gadsby's, 
19th street, near Pa. av. 
corner of D and 10th sts. 
corner of 8th and D sts. 
Pa. av. opposite Gadsby's, 
corner of 13th and E sts. 
7th street, near D. 
6th st. opposite Gadsby's. 
7th st. op. Patent Office, 
Md. av. corner of 13 1-2 st. 
Pa. av. betw. 12 and 13 sts 
corner of E and 7th sts. 
E street, near the theatre 
Pa. av. near Gadsby's, 



Isaar Beers. 

A. Fuller & Co. 
Voltaire Willet. 
R. H. Harrington, 
Jesse Brown. 
Newton & Gadsby. 

B. O. Shekell, 
J. R. Queen. 
A. Butler. 

H. W. Sweeting. 



J. Bonlanger. 
A. Favier. 
John Foy. 
Thomas Baker. 
T.J. Fletcher. 
J. S. Hall. 
George St. Clear. 
H. Fossett. 
S. Kleindienst. 
J. C. Stewart. 
A. Hancock. 
Joseph Davis. 
G. Powell. 
W. Benters. 



WASHINGTON BUS 

Physicians. 

Berry, Robert T., Navy yard. 
Burrows, Joseph, E at betw. and 10. 
Cansin, N., ntli at, betw. G and H Bts. 
Coombs. J. G., Navy Yard. 
Condict, H. F., Pa. av, betw. 12 and 13. 
Davis, Alex. McD., E at, betw. 6 and 7. 
Dawes, F., corner 9th and n ats 
Doman, A., G at, betw. l-2r.li and 13th 
Fry, T. B. J., Pa. av, near 15th Bt 
Hall, F., E st, betw. loth and lltli 
Hall, J. C, Pa. av, betw. 9th and 10th. 
Haw, H., Brown's hotel 
Hoban, H., K at, betw. 5th ■ 
Howard, F-, corner "i l ith and F sts 

. Wm. P., 7 bud 
Jones, Wm., (' -t, betw. 3d and 4 1-2. 
Jones, T. D., Pa. av, bet 3d and 4 1-8 

. ,i. \., Capitol H:ii. i r. S. N.) 
Lindslj , Harvey, Pa av, bet. 6and 7 

ler.W. B. I'a. av. cor. 21st st-\V. 
Mav, Frederick, Capitol Hill. 
May, (i. W. cor. 9th and E Bts. 
McKnight, G. B. 3d, btw. I'a. av. and C. 
M< Williii'iis, Alex. Navy Yard. 
Miller, T. cur. K and I'a. av. and 14 St 
Munding.J. M., F at, bet 12 an 
Piper, J. 11. Homeepathic Physician- 
Office, X. side Pa. av, near ilth st 
Roberts. J. M. Navy Yard. 
Sewall, Thomas, cor. C and 4 1 
Smoot, S. C. Pa. av. bet L2 and 13 Bts 
Thomas J. M. Pa. av. bet 1 ; nd 15 sts. 
Washington, B. 6th st, bet. D and E 

Saddles, Trunks, etc. 

Conner, Wm. W. 8th Bt, E. near N. Y. 
14 & 15. 
Peck, J. Pa. av.op. Brown's Hotel 

Polkinhorn &. Campbell, Pa. av. east of 

Gadsby's. 
Summers. Owen, 7th st, op. Patent Of. 
Willner, Geo. 9t i'a. av. 

Soap and Candle Man's. 

Bates £ Brothers, G st, N. bet 6 and 7. 

Doniioghue, D. & P. & Co. G at, N. of 

the Jail, and in Georgetown, D.C. 

Stoves, Tin Ware, etc. 

Harrover, W. H. 7th, near Dst. 
Hauptman, Daniel, lltli st. above P. av. 
Hill, F. & W. N. side Pa. av. bet. 9 & 10. 
Kellv, J as. Pa. av. bet. 17 and IS sts. 
McCauley, Wm. Pa. av. bet. 11 and 12. 
Naylor, F.Y., S. s. Pa.av. I t. 3d &41-2 
Richey, H., S. side I'a. av. et. 11 and 12. 
Schussler. C. 7th st, bet, D and E sts 
Tonga Rich'd, 7th st, bet. I) and E. 
Woodward, C, north side I'a. av. bet 10 
and Hth sts 

Tailors and Drapers. 

Bates, R. \V., Pa. av, near 7 buildings. 
Browning, P. W., N. side Pa. av, betw. 
3d and~4 1-2 streets. 



RECTORY. 



131 



Burns, Benjamin, N. Bide Pa. av, east 
Gadsby's hotel 

Byn-, G. W., N. side Pa. av. E. Gads- 
by s hotel. 

Cammack, Christopher, F st, near 15th. 

Duvall &. Bro., N. side Pa. av. bet. 3d 
and 4 1-2 streets 

Dyer, Elijah, loth st, op. Treas. Dep. 

Eckloff, C, Pa. av, bet 0th and 7th, and 
i'a. av. bet. 12th and 13th 

Eckloff. G-, 13th st. 1 door ab. Pa. av 

Elwood, I. T., S. side Pa. av. bet. b'&7. 

Fowler i: Daniel, N. side Pa. av. betw. 
3d and 4 1-2 streets 

s, T. F., N. side Pa. av. betw. 
li 'tli and Uth streets 

Hurley, J. p., I'a. iv., near 7 buildings. 

Jacobs, Thomas E. & Co., N. side Pa. 
av, betw. 3d and 4 1-2 sts 

Johnson, J. M., Pa. av, bet. 4 1-2 and 6. 

Jone . J. H , I'a. av, bet 14th and loth. 

Lane & Tucker, Pa. av. near 4 1-2 st 

Lnsby & Duvall, I'a. av, 1 door east of 
- hotel 

Matlock & Griffith, 9th st, near Pa. av. 
. M., N. side Pa. av, bet. 4 1-2 
and 6th I • 

McKenna, P., Pa. av, W.of41-2 st 

Evans & Co., Naval and Milita- 
ry Tailors, Pa. ar. near Fuller's Ho- 
tel. ;md ldoor east of Brown's. 

Rawliags, W. J. north side Pa. av. bet. 
8th and 9th ats. 

Reed & Malbon, S. side Pa. av. oppo- 
-by's. 

Scott, S., 7th st. east, near the Market. 
-<>n, Joseph It. Gadsby's Hotel. 

Tucker, E. & Son, Pa. av. btw. Brown's 
and Gads 

rtermahle, G.W. 7th st op. Patent Ofe 

Welch, C. D. 8th st E. op. Marine Gar. 

Wright, L. cor. 4 1-2 and Pa. av. N. side. 

Young & Steer, noith side Pa. av. one 
door west of Brown's Hotel. 

Young, E. cor. 10th »t. and Pa. av. 

Zimmeiman P. north ^ide Pa. av. betw. 
10th and 11th sts. 

Teachers of Music. 

Downey, Thos. corner 13th and D sts. 
Pratt, Wm. 12th St. near Pa. av. 
Schell, J. E., F. st. betw. 12th and 13th. 

ToT>acco, Snuff, etc. 

Clephane, James, Nf. side Pa. av. betw. 

4 1-2 and Cth sts. 
Faherty, W. P., H st, near Pa. av. 
Lawrence, James, N. side Pa. av.betw. 

4 1-2 and I 
McKean, J. P., N. side Pa. av. east of 

Gadsby's. 

Upholsterers and Paper 
Hangers. 

Alexander, C. Pa. av. betw. 12 and 13. 
Franklin, S. P., Pa. av. betw. b aid 10. 
Muller &. Moore, Pa. av. (north side.) 
between 11 and 12. 



S AND INSTITUTIONS, 



Reese, Andrew, S. side Pa. av. between 
9th and lOtli sts. 

Venetian Blinds. 

Noell, William, Pa. av. (south side,) be- 
tween 12th and 1:5th streets, is exten- 
sively prepared to execute, at the 
shortest notice, and on reasonable 
terms, all work in his line of business. 
Work made to order, in all shapes and 
colors, suitable for offices, halls, ho- 
tels and dwellings. Constantly on 
hand, all kinds of worsted cords, tas- 
sels, etc. 

"Watches, Jewelry, etc. 

Ball, J. S. Pa. av. op. 7 Buildings. 
Pister, D. Pa. av. near Beer's Hotel. 
Gaither, J. W., S. side Pa. av. bet. 12th 

and 13th sts— manufacturer of Silver 

Ware and Jewelry. 
Gait, James, N. side Pa. av. bet. 9 & 10. 
Key worth, R., north side Pa. av. bet. 9th 

and 10th sts 
Lewis, S. manufacturer of Silver Ware, 

Pa. av. 2 doors E. of 13th st 
Mast, S. Pa. av. east of the Nat. Hotel. 

Jewelry and Fancy Store, and manu- 
facturer of Jewelry and Sdver Ware. 

Clocks, Watches and Musical Boxes 

repaired and warranted. 
Mas!, F. & Co. N. side Pa av. bet. 9th 

and 10th sts 
Nixon, Richard, 13th st, 3 doors above 

Pa. av., Silversmith and Jeweller. 
Williams, A. W. Silversmith and Jew 

eller, Pa. av. near Beers' Hotel. 



Wines and Liquors. 

Favier, A. 19th st. near Pa. av. 
Haibaugh.L. 7th st, near Gen. P. Office. 
Iviieller, S. G. Pa. av. oppo. Gadsby's. 
McColgan, .las. south side Pa. av. bet. 

12th and 13th sts 
Peters, A. J., N. side Pa.'av. bet 9th and 

10th sts. 
Serames, Ed., N. side Pa. av. near 4 1-2. 
Semmes, T. F., N. side Pa. av. E. 4 1-2. 
Semmes & Murray, south side Pa. av. 

bet. 4 1-2 and 6th sts 

Wheelwrights. 

Doniphan, W. T. cor. 11th and E sts. 
Jones & Hodgkin, E st, betw. 12th and 
13th sts., wheelwright and blacksmith. 
Narden, J. 7th st. betw. G and H 

Miscellaneous. 

Leccher, Cupper <f Bleeder — Samuel de 
Vaughan, 9th st. bet. Pa. av. and E 

Looking Glass and Picture Frame Man- 
ujacturer.— Francis Lamb, opposite 
the National Theatre. 

Measurer — Joseph Haibaugh, 7th street, 
near Patent Office. 

Silver Plater.— David Miller, 12th st. 
between Pa. av. and C st 

Thompson's Life Preserver. -R. Thomp- 
son, north side Pa. av. one door west 
of 4 1-2 st. 

Turner.— T. Adams, D st. between 9th 
and 10th sts. 

Umbrella Maker.— T>. Pierce, Pa. av. 
between 12th and 13th sts. 

Victualler-— J '. Hoover, cor. 7th and D: 



City Government of Frederick for 1842. 

GEORGE HOSKINS, Mayor. 

A. Campbell, Regist. | J. McDonald, Clerk. [ Henry Baer, Col. 

BOARD OF ALDERMEN.— John Kunkle, (President,) William Small, H. 
Kelley, Calvin Page, G. W Ent. 

BOARD OF COMMON COUNCIL.— George Salmon, (President,) John 
A. Simmons, Henry Boteler, Jacob Haller, Edw, Lare, Gideon Bantz, Thomas 
Carlin. 

Collector of Water Rents— R. Rohn. \Police Officers— John Bender, M. H. 
Weighers ofHay—¥. Henry, G. Waters. | Haller. 

MAGISTRATES — M. E. Bartgis, William Lowe, Philip Lowe, John Mc 
Donald, George Hoskins, George Hauer, Ezra Dadysman, Abner Campbell. 

JUSTICES OF THE DISTRICT COURT.— Michael Baltzell, Chief Jus- 
tice ; George Salmon, James A. Gallagher, Associates. 

SOCIETIES AND INSTITUTIONS. 



Literary, Religious, etc. 

Frederick Literary Association.— Formed April, 1841. Meets 

in the lecture room of the German Reformed Church. John Baltzell, Pre- 
sident; H. Winchester, Vice President ; George W. Trissler, Secretary J. A. 
Steiner, Treasurer; Wm. A. Pratt, librarian. 



SOCIETIES AND INSTITUTIONS. 139 

Frederick College.— Has 1-20 students. Rev. J. Smith, A. M., 
President; A. 31. Vernon, Professor Mathematics; L. Markel!, teacher Eng 
liflb department. 

Franklin Debating Society. — Formed July 4, 1841. George 

Baltzell, President; J. Doll, Vice President ; J. D. English, .secretary. 

St. John's Literary Institution. — Situated on Second .street. 
Founded August 7, 1828. Pupils, 115. Rev. John McElroy, President; 
Rev. B. A. Young, Kev. James Power, Charles King, Miles Gibbons, Win. Fin- 
negan, Faculty . 

Tulli Piieboian Society of St. John's Literary Institution- 
Formed June 5 ery Tbured <y evening in the ball of the insti- 

tution. Rev. B. A. Young, President; R. W. Brady, Vice President; Eugene 
N. PiCOt, Recording, and William F. Budd, Corresponding Secretary ; J. 
SheUman, treasurer ; J. I. Dyer, D. F. Tormey c 

Novitiate of the Society of Jesus. — Scholastics, 3 ; Lay- 
Brothers, 6; Rev. F. Dzierozinski, Instructor of Novices. 

Methodist Episcopal Sabbath School.— Formed 1825. Con- 
tun- 80 children. .). Whitehill, President ; A. H. Hunt, Vice President, G. 
Koontz, Secretary. 

St. John's Female Boarding School.— Second street. Is under 
the care of 10 Sisters of Chanty. Pupils, 61. 

S*r. John's Orphan Asylum and Free School. — Connected with 

the Academy. H.is Jl orphans and 100 pupils. 



Clmrchcs and Ministers in Frederick. 



NAMES OF CHURCHES. 



Catholic— St. John's, 

Do. St. Ignatius' 
Protestant Episcopal — AH Saints, 
Methoditt Episcopal — Church st. 

Da. ' African, 

Presbyterian, 

/I apt 1st. 

ral Lutheran, 
Evan., or German Reformed, 



Second street, 



Second street, 
Church street, 
Church =treet, 



Second street, 



MINISTERS. 



r Rev. J. McElroy, Rector, 
< Rev. B. A. Young, and 
rRi . Jas. Power, /lssisi , s 
I Re . V Dzierozinski, R. 
I Rev. S. Mulleday, Jtt't. 
Rev. J. Peterkin, 
Rev. A. A. Reese. 

Do. 
Rev. J. Smith. 
Rev. Mr. Jones. 
Rev. S. W. Harkey. 
Rev. D. Zacharias, 



Fire Companies. 



NAMES. 



Friendship, 

'■■'. i on Hose, 

Mechauic, 

Junior, 

Independent Hose Company 



LOCATION. 



N. Market st 
S. Market st. 
W. Patrick st. 
Second street. 



PRESIDENT 



PH. Cramer, 
H. Water.,, 
J. Hait, 
E. Houck, 
C. Quynn, 



SECRETARY. 



George Lease. 
George W. Ent. 
J. D. Fauble. 
E. Dadysman. 
V. Ehert. 



Military Companies. 

Mohawk Invincibles. — Organized, 1841. D. Brengle, Captain; 

Jacob Fauble, 1st, and Josiah DayhorV, 2d, and William Gittinger, 3d, Lieut 
National Guards. — Organized, 1841. L. Brengle, Captain ; E. 

Shriver, 1st, George A. Fischer, 2d, and J. A. Stein er, 3d Lieut. 
Maryland Light Infantry.— William Small, Captain ; J. Hos- 

kins, 1st, David Brengle, 2d, and C. Shriver, 3d Lieut. 



14:0 



FREDERICK EUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Banks. 

Frederick County Bank.— Discount day, Tuesday. John P. 

Thompson, President; Henry Doyle, Cashier ; Edw. Turbutt, Teller. 

Frederick Town Branch Bank. — Discount day, Wednesday. 

Win. Ross, President } Cyras Mantz, Cashiers Godfrey Koontz, Teller. 
Farmers and Mechanics Bank of Frederick Co. — Discount 

day, Tuesday. William Tyler, President ; Thomas W. Morgan, Cashier; 
Ezra Houck, Teller. 
Frederick Town Savings Institution. — Dscount day, Tuesday. 
Williams. Nrl'herson, President ; George Englebrecht, Secretary j Valentine 
I. Brunner, Clerk. 

Odd Fellows. 

Adam Lodge, No. 3.5. — Instituted, May 15, 1841. Number of mem- 
bers, 62 Meets every Tuesday evening, at the corner of Market and Patrick 
sts. John Keafauver, N. G.; James M. Harding, V. G.; F. Augustus Kigney, 
Secretary ; Otto G. Ent, Treasurer. 

Junior Marion Temperance Society. — Founded April 12, 1841. 

Meets weekly in the lecture room of the German Reformed Church. Number 
of members, -200. John A. Steiner, President ; I. C. O 'Neil, Vice President; 
W. H. Trisler, Secretary; J. Wisong, treasurer. 

Irish Repeal Association. — George Hoskins, President; Wm. 

Slater and Patrick O'Neill, Vice Presidents; Patrick Tormey, secretary; A. 
D. O'Leary, treasurer. 



FREDERICK BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Apothecaries. 

Fischer, Geo. J. west Patrick st. near 

City Hotel. 
Johnston, Robt. Marketst near Patrick. 
Mantz, A. K. cor. Market and Patrick. 
Miller, J. S. Market st, op. the market. 

Attornies. 

Balcb, L. P. W. 

Brengle, Francis, cor. Court and 2d st. 
Coale", J. 31. Couit, near Second at. 
Luckett, Jlountjoy B. east Church st. 
Lynch, E. A. o!rk e and dw. Church st. 
Markell, T. M. Court st. near Patrick. 
Marshall. R. H. Court square. 
Nelson, Madison, Court square. 
Palmer, J. M. Market st. between Pat- 
rick and Church sts. 
Pitts, N. H. Court square. 
Ross, Wm. J. office N. Market st. 
Schley, F. A. Court square. 
Tyler, Samuel. Court square. 
Worthington, Thomas Contee, Court st. 

Baiters & Confectioners. 

Behrens, F. Patrick st. on the bend. 
Heeter, Uriah, east Pati ick st. 
Shaftuer, Ann Maria, east Patrick st. 
Yeakle, airs. Sarah, Market st. 
Blacksmiths. 

Eader, L. B. Love lane, near E. Patrick. 
Keefer, F. Church st. near Market. 
Lare, E. east Patrick st. 
Reich, Wm. Market, near All Saint st. 



Booksellers & Stationers. 

Markell, John & Sons, corner Patrick 
and Court sts. 

Pratt, Wm. A. cor. Market and Church 
streets, bookseller, stationer, circula- 
ting library, and reading room. 

Tormey, P. east Patrick st. near Market. 

Boots and Shoes. 

Malambre, George, north Market st 

Metzger, George, west Patrick st 

O'Neal, I. C. south Market St. 

Palmer & Carmack.west Patrick street, 
opposite City Hotel, wholesale and 
retail dealers. 

Roelkey, G. A., N. Market, between 
Church and Chapel. 

Stedding, C, W. Patrick st. near Mar- 
ket. — Casli boot and shoe maker.. 

Steiner, J. A., N. Market St. between 2d 
:n;d 3d sts. 

Storm, P. L. south Market st. 

Tormey, P. east Patrick st. four doors 
from" Market, wholesale and retail dea- 
ler. 

Wenz, L., E. Patrick st. 

Yeakle, J., N. Market st betw. Church 
and Chapel. 

Brick Makers. 

Hart, Jaco 
Miller, Da 
Broker — Lottery 4' Exchange. 
O'Leary, A. D. Patrick st op. City Hot 



W. Patrick st. 
el, W. Patrick st 



FREDERICK BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



141 



Cabinet & Chair Makers. 

Kelly, H., sen. Market st. near 5th. 

Price, Perry, N. Market, near 4th at. 

Salmon, George, 2d st east of Market. 

Schroeder & Bierly, N. Market st. be- 
tween 2d and 3d. 

Shaffner, P. it. chair and Venetian blind 
maker, E. Patrick st. 

Shope, George 15., E. Patrick st. 

Whitebill, J., E. Patrick sU 

Carpenters. 

Brengle, D. east Patrick st. 

Cole, George A. east Church st 

Eader, Thomas, east Church st. 

Heim, A. west Patrick st. 

Magahan, G. Market st. near U. S. Hot. 

Carpet Manufacturer. 

Conrailt, G. M. west Patrick st. ingrain 
carpet manufacturer. 

Coach Makers. 

Boteler, Henry, Market st. 
Ent & Hame, south Market st. 
Shultz, H. nortli Market st. 

Coopers. 

Robinson, J. east Patrick st. 
Steiner, D. C. east Patrick st. 

Copper and Sheet Iron. 

Brown, William S. east Patrick street, 

brass i '< . 1 1 1 1 . 1 • ■ r , stove dealer, eto . 
Devitt, D. B. east Patrick st. 

Dry Goods. 

Bartholow & Shy rock, north Market st. 

near Patrick. 
Boyd, David, Market st. comer of Mar 

ket space. 
Buck, J. Market st. between 2d and 3d. 
Deck, Joseph, Market, near Church St 
Gittiiiger, Win. cur. Market and 5th sts. 
Hart, E., W. Patrick, near City Hotel. 
Markell, John & Sons, corner of Court 

and Patrick sts. 
Markell, Jacob, west Patrick st. oppo- 
site City Hotel. 
McCaffry, M., W. Patrick, near Court. 
Myers, M. Tobias, Market street, betw. 

2d and 3d. 
Nixdorh", H., W. Patrick st 
Rohr, J. cor. Market and 3d st 
Rosenstock, P., W. Patrick st. 
Shriver, J. cor. Market and Patrick sts. 
Smalhvood, W. C. Market, near Patrick. 
Steiner, C. Market, betw. 4th and 5th. 
Thomas, Henry. W. Patrick st. near 

Frederick Co. Bank. 
Trisler, Geo. Market, near 2d st 
Webster, G. Market, between Church 

and Patrick sts. 
Wilcoxon, John, E. Patrick st near 

Market — dry goods and clothing store. 
Wolfe, A. Market st op. Farmers' and 

Mechanics' Bank. 



Forwarding and Com- 
mission Merchants. 

Boone, R., R.R. Depot, also E. Pat'k st 
Whitter, Thomas, R. R. Depot 
Wilson, Chas., U. K. Depot 
Shriner & Scholl, Hour and grain deal 
ers, E. Patrick st 

Grocers, 

Wholesale and P.ctail. 

Brengle, G. L. &. Co. cor. 4 and Market. 

Brunner, John, of J. cor. of 2d and 
Market sts. 

Engelbreicbt, J., E. Pat'k near Market. 

Groshon, Geo. S., E. Patrick st. 

Hanson, A. B. wholesale and retail gro- 
cer, and dealer in i'our, W. Patrick tt. 

Heim, A., W. Patrick st. cor. Mill alley, 
groceries and dry goods. 

Hunt, A. H. Market st. 1 door north of 
Market House. 

Klessner, Win. Market st betw. 2 and 3. 

Lueber, F. Market st. btw. Pat'k and Ch. 

McAleer, H., E. Patrick st. 

Norris, Basil, W. Patrick stop. C. H. 

Keel, J. B. cor. Patrick and Carroll sts. 

Shrivel, Chas. «fc Co. wholesale and re- 
tail groi ers, cor. Market and Patrick. 

Tice, Ann, E, Patrick st. 

Gun Cmiihs. 

Metzger, J., W. Patrick st. 
Wentzell, W. H., E. Patrick st 

Hair Dressers. 

Grailey, J. M. D., west Patrick st near 

Market. 
Reynolds, J. W. cor. Patrick and Court. 

Hardware. 

Quynn, A. & Gomber, east Patrick st. 
wholesale and retail dealers. 

Hats, Caps, and ]?ars. 

Cole, W. G. west Patrick st. opposite 
City Hotel. 

Hauer, N. D., W. Patrick, near Court 

Palmer & C.mnack, W. Patrick, oppo- 
site City Hotel, wholesale and retail 
dealers. 

Springer, D. west Patrick st 

Tormey, P. east Patrick st. one door 
from Market, wholesale and retail 
dealer. 

Iron and Brass Founder. 

Page, Calvin, south Market street, iron 
and brass founder, and manufacturer 
of agricultural implements. 

Milliners. 

Barry, A. I. millinery and fancy goods, 
Market st. betw. Patrick and Church. 
Crable, Jane.W. Patrick st. on the bend. 
Eaton, M. A. cor. Market and Church. 
Jackson, Mary, Market st. between 2d 
and 3d. 



14:3 



FREDERICK BCSINESS DIRECTORY, 



Newspapers. 

Republican Citizen, by Rigney & Mc 

Lanahan — office, Church st. 
Visiter and Temperance Advocate, by 

G. P. Staymen— office, VV. Church st. 
Frederick Kxaminer, by J. Williams — 

office, Market st 
Frederick Herald, by E. Hughes — office, 

corner Market and Church. 

Physicians. 

Baltzell, John, east Church st. 
Dorsey, Lloyd, cor. Market and 3d sts. 
Dorsey, R. east Second st. 



Goldsborougb, E. Y. west Patrick st 
Jeuks, W. D. dental surgeon, Eagle 

Hotel, west Patrick St. 
Kohl., \V. W. east Third st. 
Mdler, Edward.— Office, Market street, 

between 2d and 3d. 
Ritchie, A., N. Market street, between 

Church and Second. 
Sanderson, W. R. cor. 2d and Market. 
Tyler, Wm. Bradley, Market st 
Ty ler, Wm. Court square. 

Portrait Painter. 

Markell, John J. Courtst 



PuMic Houses. 



NAME*. 


LOCATION. 


LANDLORDS 


City Hotel, 


West Patrick street, 


D. Dorsey. 


E igle Hotel, 


West Patrick street, 


J. Walling. 


r aimers' Inn, 


North Market street, 


J. A. Hedges. 
L. Stein. 


Globe Hotel, 


East Patrick street, 


National Hotel, 


Cor. Court and Church streets, 


B. Gilbeit 


- Hi t 1, 


Cor. Market mid All Saints sts. 


N. Turbutt 


[Tnioa Tavern, 


East Market street 




Washington Coffee House, 


Court s..eet, 


D. H. Scbleigh. 



Haller's, 

Magu ire's, 
Martin's, 
O'Neill's, 
Rettge ring's, 
Wentz's, - 

Saddles, Trunks, etc. 

Keller, C. F. Market st. near Patrick. 
Keller, C. J., W. Patrick, near Market 
Schissler, J. A. cor. Market and 2d. 
Scholl & Lare, Market st. near Patrick. 
Traill, E , Market st. near Patrick. 

Skin Dressers. 

Ebert, John & Sons, west Patrick St. 
Fntchie & Hanshew, west Patrick st. 

Tailors and Drapers. 

Bierman, H. A. west Patrick st. 

Degrange, P., N. Market, bet. C and 7. 

Engelbrecht, M. W. & J. Market street, 
betw. Patrick and Church. 

Faubel,J. & J. west Patrick st. near 
City Hotel. 

Faubel & Firestone, N. Market st. btw. 
Church and Patrick. 

Galligher, James A., E. Patrick street, 
ready made clothing store. 

Goodman, P. Market st. cor. Market sp. 

Grumbine, D. M., S. Market st. 

Lambrecht, F. Market St. btw. 5 and 6. 

Mannstadt, C. F., E. Patrick, near Mar- 
ket st. 

Nichols & Cromwell, W. Patrick st. 
near the City Hotel. 

Norris, J. L., E. Patrick, near Market. 



Mc Houses. 

West Patrick street, 
South Market street, 
South Market street, 
South Market street, 
West Patrick street, 
East Patrick street, 



Jacob Haller. 
J. Maguire. 
W. Martin. 
J. O'Neill, 
S. Rettgering, 
W. Wentz. 



Shultz «te Simian, Market st. near Far- 
mer's and Mechanics' Bank. 

Simmons, J. A. Market st. near Freder- 
ick Co. Bank. 

Wolfe, A. Market at. opposite Farmers' 
and Mechanics' Bank. 

Tanners and Curriers. 

Bantz, Gideon, west end Church st 
Birely, Valentine, Carroll st. 
Birely, Lewis, E. Patrick st 
Getzandanner, C, W. end Patrick 6t 
Harrison, Z. east Patrick st. 
Hauer, Wm. east Patrick st 
Kunkel, John, Carroll st. 
Quynn, Casper, S. Market st 
Talbot, M. Brew House alley. 

Toliacco, Snuff, etc. 
Daughaday, J. west Patrick st near the 

Frederick Co. Bank. 
Eberts, M., N. Market st cor. 4th. 
Mantz, J. A , W. Patrick st. 
Pope, J . H. cor. Market and 2d sts. 
Turners. 

Carlin, T. Market st. btw. 4th and 5th. 
Wentz. Wm., E. Patrick st. 

Watch Makers. 

Conner, H. Market st. near Farmers' 
and Mechanics' Bank. 



TY GOVERNMENT OF ANNAPOL] 



143 



Feeler. J., \V. Patrick, near Public st. 

Fox, A.. E. Patrick st 

Nusz, F , E. Patrick st 

Woodward, B., E. Patrick »t S. Bide, 

clocks, watches and jewelry. 
Miscellaneous. 
Bookbinder.— W. Chambers, W. Church 

street. 



Marble Manufacturer. — John McDer- 
mott, N . Market st. 

Glue Manufacturer.— C. Seaman, oppo- 
site the Citv Mills. 

Miller.— W. C. Hoffman, Mill alley. 

Rope Makei — J. Keller, east Patrick st. 

Soap and Candle Mamtfacturer. — S. B. 



II' 



Hogg, E. Patrick .-t. 

" Iwright.— Wm. Ogle, E. Patrick st 



City Government of Annapolis for 1843. 

A. C. MAGRUDER, Mayor. | JOHN JOHNSON, Recorder. 
BOARD OF ALDERMEN.— Richard Goodwin, Thomas Alexander, Daniel 
T. Hyde, Dennis Claude, Alexander Randall. 

BOARD OF COMMON COUNCIL.— Thomas Ireland, George Johnson, G. 
Munroe, George Wells, William McNeir, Richard Swann, William Brewer. 



Sketch of the City of Annapolis. 



In the year 1643, the Assembly of the 
province of Virginia passed an act to 
prevent dissenting ministers from prop 
agatine their doctrines in the Colony. 
The Puritans, however, in del 
the law, kept up their conventicles for 
several years; until, in 1648, ' 
ernment became i-till more severe in it 
enactments, and they were compelled 
to withdraw. In 1649, they rerm.v 
small parties to Maryland, and settled 
near the Severn river, calling tl 
tlement "Providence." It aft 
bore the names of "Proctorr," "Town 
land at Severn," "Town of Proctor* 
"■The town land at Seve7"n, where the 
town wns formerly," ■■Jam 
Town," "Port of Annapolis." Final), 
in 1708, it was ci irtered under the name 
of the CITY OF ANN LPOLIS. Be 
fore the Puritans wereallov 
or to hold any land in the colony, thej 
were compelled to take an oath of fi- 
i>l : tv to ford Baltimore, the lord pro- 
mt from the king 
of Great Bri1 - of land they 

Occupied, w is not inhabited at any pre- 
vious period by Europeans. The 1'uri 
tans becoming dissatisfied with the Gov 
ernment of the lord proprietor refused, 
in several instances, to send delegates to 
embly, which met at St. Mary's. 
and becoming refractory, they seized 
upon the government — turning out the 
colonial officers, and appointing others 
in their places. The lord proprietor, dis- 
pleased at this movement, direct, rj his 
friends not to submit tamely to such 
innovation. They accordingly armed 
themselves, and succeeded in quelling 



napolis. The records were removed 
from St. Mary's in bags well packed with 
cordage and hides, under a strong guard. 
In 1698, by an act of Legislature, an aca- 
demy was established under the title of 
•'Kin? William's School." In 1697, the 
state library was commenced, and the 
state house erected. The state house 
Jtroyed by tire in 1704; rebuilt in 
1706. The lirst number of the Maryland 
Gazette, edited bv Jonas Green, was is- 
sued in 17-15. In 1774, the brig Peggy 
Stewart, laden with tea, was publicly 
burnt in the port. On the 6th Jul 
the delegates of Maryland met in the 
.-'tale House, and resolve. 1 that the king 
of Great Britain had violated his com- 
pact with the people, and that they owed 
him no allegiance whatever. They em- 
powered their delegates in Congress to 
join with a majority "of the United Colo- 
nic*, in declaring them free and indepen- 
dent States. The people were called upon 
to contribute, as they had ability, to the 
ect of freeing the country from 
ppTession,and to place the State 
in a position of defence. So eager were 
the citizens of Mary land, in their efforts 
to save their land from the ravages of an 
enemy, that in August, 1781, with one 
day's notice, two thousand three hun- 
dred militia assembled at Annapolis. An 
ttack was expected from the British 
fleet which had entered the Chesapeake 
bay. The attack, however, was not 
made, and the fleet passed up York river. 
From 17!-'0, Annapolis began to decline, 
and Baltimore to take the advance; 
and while the latter has continued to 
increase with almost unprecedented 



the insurgents, and reducing them to; rapidity, her patriotic sister has not al- 
Submission to the government of the: together declined. She has maintained 
lord proprietor. her ancient landmarks, and possesses 

In 16'. 14, the seat of government was,] as much of the true nobility of nature 
by an act of Assembly,"" removed to An as any city of her size in the country. 



144 










INDEX 






TO BALTIMORE DUS1NESS DIRECTORY — 


IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER. 


Agricultural Stores, 


94 


Engravers, . 


109 


Opticians, 


119 


Amusements, 


94 


Feather Beds, etc. 


109 


Organs, 


119 


Apothecaries, 


VI 


Feed Stores, 


109 


Painters, 


119 


Architects and Build's 


, 96 


Files, 


109 


Paints, Oils and Glass 


, 119 


Artificial Flowers, . 


96 


Finding Stores, . 
Flour Dealers, 


109 


Paper Hangings, 


119 


Auctioneers, 


96 


109 


Paper Warehouses, 


119 


Bakers, 


96 


Forwarding and Com- 


Pattern Makers, 


120 


Band and Fancy Box' 


-, 96 


mission Merchants 


, 109 


Periodica] Agents, ; 


120 


Baskets and Wooden 




Fruit Dealers, 


109 


Physicians, 


120 


Ware, 


95 


Furniture Dealers, 


110 


Piano Fortes, 


121 


Baths, 


95 


Fur Dealers, ; 


110 


Planes, 


121 


Bell Hangers, 


96 


Furnishing Stores-Gen- 


Platers, 


121 


Blacksmiths, 


96 


tlemcns , t 


110 


Plumbers, 


121 


Block and Pump Mak 


s 96 


Glass Manufacturer, 


no 


Potteries, 


121 


Boarding Houses, . 


96 


Gold Beater, . 


110 


Powder Manufacturer, 121 


Boat Builders, 


96 


Grain Dealers, 


110 


Printers, 


121 


Bookbinders, 


96 


Grocers, 


no 


Property and Genera 




Booksellers and Stat'rs DC 


Gun Smiths, 


in 


Agents, 


122 


Bonnets and Straw G 


s 97 


Hair Dressers, . 


in 


Provision Dealers, 


122 


Boot and Shoe Makers, 'J7 


Hair Work, 


112 


Public Houses, 


122 


Boots, Shoes, Hats, 




Hardware Dealeis, 


112 


Rope Maker, 
Saddlery, 


123 


etc. Wholesale, 


93 


Hats, Caps, Furs, etc. 112 


123 


Botanic Medicines, 


98 


Hides and Leather, 


113 


Saddles, Trunks, etc. 


123 


Bottling Establishm't 


3 ,98 


Horse Shoers, . 


113 


Sail Makers, 


124 


Brass Founders, 


98 


Hosiery and Gloves, 


113 


Salt Store, 


124 


Brewers, . 


99 


Ink Manufacturer, 


113 


Scales and Balances, 


124 


Brickmakers, 


99 


Instrument Makers, 


113 


School Teachers, 


124 


Brokers, 


99 


Iron Founders, . 


113 


Seed Stores, 


124 


Brush Makers, 


100 


Iron and Steel, 


114 


Ship Chandlers, , 


124 


Butchers, 


100 


Jeweller, 


114 


Shipwrights and Caulk- 


Cabinet Makers, 


101 


Lace Goods, 


114 


ers, 


124 


Card Manufacturers, 


101 


Lace and Fringe, 


114 


Ship Joiners, 


124 


Carpenters, 


101 


Lamp Makers, 


114 


Silversmiths, 


124 


Carpetings. 


101 


Last Makers, 


114 


Slave Dealers, 


124 


Carvers, 


102 


Leather Dealers, 


114 


Soap and Candles, 


125 


Chair Manufacturers 


102 


Leechersand Bleeders 115 


Stoves, Grates, etc. 


125 


Chemical Workers, 


102 


Letter Cutter— metal, 115 


Sugar Refiners, 


125 


China and Glass Ware 102 


Libraries, Circulating, 115 


Surgical Instruments 


125 


Clothing Stores. 


102 


Lime and Feed, 


115 


Taiiors and Drapers, 


125 


Clock Dealers, . 


103 


Lithographers, 


115 


Tanners, 


126 


Coach Builders, 


103 


Livery Stables, 


115 


Tin Plate and Sheet 




Coal Dealers, 


103 


Lock Smiths, 


115 


Iron Workers, 


126 


Collectors and Proper- 


Looking Glass and Pi 


c- 


Tobacco, Snuff and 




ty Agents, 


103 


ture Frames, 


115 


Segars, 


126 


Combs and Fancy 




Lumber, 


116 


Trimming Stores, 


126 


Goods, 


103 


Machinists, . 


116 


Turners, 


126 


Commission Merch's, 


104 


Magistrates, 


116 


Umbrellas and Para- 




Confectioners, 


104 


Mahogany, 
Marble Manufact's, 


116 


sols, 


127 


Coopers, 


105 


116 


Undertakers, 


127 


Copper Dealers, 


105 


Medicines, 


116 


Upholsterers, 


127 


Copper Smiths, . 


105 


Merchants, 


116 


Variety Stores, . 


127 


Cork Cutters, 


105 


Military Goods. 


117 


Venetian Blinds, 


127 


Corsets, etc. 


105 


Milliners, 


117 


Veterinary Surgeon, 


127 


Counsellors. 


105 


Millstones, , 


117 


Vinegar, 


127 


Curriers, . 


106 


Mineral Water, 


117 


Watches, Jewelry, 




Cutlers, 


106 


Miscellaneous, 


128 


etc., 


127 


Dentists, 


106 


Morocco Dealers, 


117 


Watch Makers' Tools 


, 127 


Druggists, 

Dry Goods-Wholesale 


106 


Musical Instruments 


, 117 


Wheelwrights, 


128 


,106 


Notaries Public, 


117 


Whips, etc. 
Window Glass, ; 


128 


Retail, . 


107 


Newspapers, 


118 


121 


Dyers, . 


108 


Nurseries, 


118 


Wmes and Liquors, 


128 


Engineer, 


109 


Oil Stores, 


11? 


Wire Workers, 


128 


Engine Hose, . 


109 


Oil Cloth, etc. 


119 


Wool Dealer, . 


128 



14:5 



CONTENTS 



OF BUSINESS DIRECTORY AND BALTIMORE ALMANAC— ALPHABETI- 
CALLY ARRANGED. 



Agents for Underwriters, . 71 

Banks, 77 

B \ltimore Business Direc- 
tory, 94—128 

Baltimore Stock Market, . 77 
Baltimore Post Office, . . 55 
Baltimore and Susquehanna 

Bad Road, 58 

Baltimore and Ohio K. Road, 58 
Beginning and Length of the 

Seasons, 3 

Biographies, 31 

Board of Trade, .... 77 
3oundaries of Wards in Bal- 
timore, 53 

Cash Account, .... 7—30 

Calendar, 6 — 28 

Census of the United States, 52 
Census of Maryland, ... 49 
Chronological Cycles, ... 3 
(lipids and Vice Consuls, . 71 
Counting House Almanac, . 146 
Courts, etc. in Maryland, . 54 

Custom House, 77 

Eclipses, etc 3 

Election in Maryland in 1841, 72 
Events in Baltimore during 

the year 1841, 40 

Exchange Reading Room, . 77 
leasts, etc. of the Catholic 

Church, 4 

flowers — directions for the 

cultivation of, etc. . . 6 — 28 
itresin Baltimore during the 45 

year 1841, 

Frederick Business Di- 
rectory, .... 140 — 143 

Jeneral Events, 34 

Jovernment of Baltimore, 61 
Jovernment of Washing- 
ton, 129 

Government of Frederick, 138 
Government of Annapolis, 143 
Jovernment of the U. S. and 
officers, clerks, etc. in the 
Departin's at Washington, 64 
Jovernment of Maryland, . 61 
iolydays of the Episcopal 
Church, 5 



Index to Baltimore Business 

Directory, 144 

Insurance, and other Incor- 
porated companies, . . 76 
Longest and Shortest Days 
in the principal Cities of 
the United States, ... 3 
Meeting of the Legislatures 

of the several States, etc. 53 
Members of the Legislature 

of Maryland, 63 

Monuments, 91 

Officers of the Senate and 
House of Representatives 
of the United States, . . 70 

Packets, 60 

Philadelphia Rail Road, . . 58 
Population of United States, 41 
Population of the principal 

Cities in the U. S. etc. . . 53 
Popular and Electoral Votes 

for President, in 1841, . . 53 
Post Offices in Maryland, . 56 

Preface, 2 

Rates of Storage, .... 51 
Resident Commissioners, . 71 
Senators and Representa- 
tives of the U. S. ... 69 
Sheriffs of the City and Co. 

of Baltimore, 57 

Sketch of the City of Anna- 
polis, 143 

Societies and Institutions in 

Baltimore, .... 73—93 
Societies and Institutions in 

Washington, . . . 129—132 
Societies and Institutions in 
Frederick, . . . 138—140 

Stages,' 59 

Steamboats, 60 

State Elections, etc. ... 53 
Table, showing the value in 
dollars and cents of a lb. 

sterling, etc 30 

United States Navy, Balti- 
more Station, 92 

Value of Coins, 51 

Washington Business Di- 
rectory, .... 132—138 



Counting-House Almanac-4842^3 







JANUARY 






a 


3 


"4 


5 


6 


7 


1 

8 


9 


10 


11 


13 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


30 


31 


33 


33 


34 


35 


36 


37 


38 


39 


30 


31 













FEBRUARY. 



. . 


. . 


6 


7 


13 


14 


30 


31 


37 


38 



1 


3i 3 


4 


5 


8 


9 10 


11 


13 


15 


16 17 


18 


19 


3:4 


33 34 


35 


36 




* * 1 * * 







MARCH. 



. , 


1 


3 


3 


4 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


31 


33 


33 


34 


35 


38 


39 


30 


31 


•• 



APRIL. 



3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


10 


11 


13 


13 


14 


17 


18 


19 


30 


31 


34 


35 


36 


37 


38 



MAY. 



5 


6 


7 


13 


13 


14 


19 


30 


31 


36 


37 


38 



JUNE. 
1 

8 
15 
33 
39 



3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


10 


11 


13 


13 


14 


17 


18 


19 


30 


31 


34 


35 


36 


37 


38 


31 











JULY. 













1 


3 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


io 


11 


13 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


30 


31 


33 


33 


41 


35 


36 


37 


38 


39 


30 


31 















AUGUST. 





1 


3' 


3 


7 


8 


9 


10 


14 


15 


16 


17 


<J1 


33 


33 


34 


38 


39 


30 


31 



4 


5 


6 


11 


13 


13 


is 


19 


30 


35 


36 


37 



SEPTEMBER. 



1 


2 


8 


9 


15 


16 


33 


33 


39 


30 



OCTOBER. 















1 


3 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


13 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


30 


31 


33 


33134 


35 


36 


37 


38 


39 


30 


31 













NOVEMBER. 



. . 


. . 


1 


3 


6 


7 


8 


9 


13 


14 


15 


16 


40 


31 


33 


33 


37 


38 


39 


30 



3 


4 


5 


10 


11 


13 


17 


18 


19 


34 


35 


36 



DECEMBER. 



JANUARY, 1843. 



1 


3 


3 


8 


9 


10 


15 


16 


17 


33 


33 


34 


39 


30 


31 



4 


5 


6 


7 


11 


13 


13 


14 


18 


19 


30 


31 


35 


36 


37 


38 



FEBRUARY, 1843. 



5 


6 


7 


13 


13 


14 


19 


30 


31 


36 


37 


38 



1 


3 


3 


r 4 


8 


9 


10 


11 


15 


16 


17 


18 


33 


33 


34 


35 



A D V E R T I S E M E N T 



The undersigned begs leave to present the business community 
and the public generally, the first volume of the " Business Di- 
rectory and Baltimore Almanac, "> which it is his intention to 
continue every year, as long as he may enjoy life and health, and 
the work meet the approbation and patronage of the public. 

That such a work is desirable, there can be no doubt; and its 
advantages may be readily seen by referring to the variety of its 
contents, which set forth, as far as possible, in the first issue, the 
entire internal operations of the city of Baltimore, and furnish 
valuable information in regard to other cities. 

The miniature size of the work renders it very convenient both 
for the counting room and the traveller, as it may be readily at- 
tached to the desk or carried in the pocket. As a reference book, 
1 it cannot but be of great advantage to all who desire information 
upon the numerous subjects referred to in its pages. 

As this is but the beginning of the enterprize, and has thus far 
met with more favor than was anticipated, the publisher indulges 
i a confident hope that it may be continued through many years, 
with constantly increasing interest both to himself and his friends. 
The knowledge gained by actual experience, in preparing for the 
first emission, will be of more value, to the publisher than any 
pecuniary profit he could possibly derive from it ; and it is his 
purpose to apply that experience with untiring industry in his future 
efforts, and he cannot for a moment entertain the least fear but that 
he shall be able to give entire satisfaction to every individual who 
may patronize his exertions. 

The volume for 1843 will be commenced early, and as many addi- 
tions and improvements are contemplated, it is hoped that all 
tnterested in the success of a work so desirable, will respond to 
his call for information in relation to every subject of interest 
connected with the city. 

In future, a complete list of the Business Community will be given, 
without charge, and without reference to subscriptions for the 
work ; and it would be well for those who contemplate a change 
in business on the first of January, to advise the publisher of it as 
early as possible, so that he may be correct in liis publication of 
their names, places of business, etc. 

The next volume will be beautifully got up, — the inside will be 
embellished with appropriate devices, and the cover will be em- 
bossed in a very splendid style. 

DANL. H. CRAIG. 



t 



^®&4* 






■■•-. % 



««Z3&**' S^=^^ !J '&^^ 



<& 



r\^ 



PRUri 






I 






@ 








ADVERTISEMENT 



Tiik undersigned begs leave to present the" business community! 
and the public generally, the first volume of the "Business Di- 
rectory and Baltimore Almanac," which it is his intention to 
continue even' year, as/iong as he may enjoy life and health, and 
the wink meet the approbation and patronage of Uhe public. 

That Buchaworkis desirable, there can be n«> doubt; and its 
advantages may be readily seen by referring to 'lie variety of its 
contents, which set forth, as far as possible ,e lirs issue the 

mtire internal operation/a of the city of J noce, and furnish 
valuable information in regard to other cjties 

The miniature size of the work renders it very convenient both 
br the counting room and the traveller, as it maybe readily at 
tached to the desk or carried in the pocket. As a refer, nee book. 
it cannot but be of great advantage to all who desire information 
ipon the numerous subjects referred to in its pages. 

As this is but the beginning of the entexprize, and lias thus far 
net with more favor, than was anticipated, the publisher indulge! 
i confident hope that it may be continued through many years, 
villi constantly increasing interest both to himself and his friends. 
I'he knowledge gained by actual " experience, in preparing for the 
first emission, will be of more value, to the publisher than an; 
pecuniar^ profit he could possibly derive from it ; and it is hi 
purpose to apply that experience with untiringindustry inhisfutun 
■florts, and he cannot fora moment entert: in the least fear buttha 
be shall be able to give entire satisfaction i i vcijy individual win 
may patronize his exertions. 

The volume for 1843 will be commenced early, and as many addi 
tions and improvements are contemplated, it is hoped that all 
Interested in the success of a work so desirable, will respond t< 
his call for information in relation to every subject of interest 
connected with the city. 

In future, a complete list, of the Business Community will be »imi. 
without charge, and without reference to subscriptions for the j 
work ; and it would be well for those who contemplate a changi 
in business on the first of January, to advise the publisher of it ai- 
early as possible, so that he may be correct in his publication o{ 
their names, places of business, etc. 

The next volume will be beautifully got up, — the inside will be 
embellished with appropriate devices, and the cover will be em- 
bossed in a very splendid style.